Complete Project #3

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My juxtaposition location was about a 5 min walk from City Tech. It was on Jay street and Myrtle. I am Juxtaposing the trees being reflected on light and the buildings in the background. There is a sense of repetition within the trees and the post lamps. I chose this location because it brought up the idea of having patches of nature throughout Nyc. It’s as if it’s forgotten or more like ignored. New Yorkers have adapted to a new way of living and they tend to ignore New York’s details.

One of the biggest distraction nowadays to us is technology, our cellphones have changed the way we view certain things. When was the last time we actually payed attention to the leaves falling off trees or observing all the bushes full of green. This juxtaposition sets a great example trees vs buildings. Buildings representing modern life and trees representing the past but the present.

There was several reading read In class but the one that stuck out to me the most was “What if you could choose between the faster route and the most beautiful” just by reading the title it makes the reader think and it makes me realize that were too busy trying to get to certain places we totally forget about our surroundings, we tend to not have time to observe. We worry that we’re going to get to work late or class. On the image the trees seem to be lightened up and for me it was like a wake up call “look at me”. The time of day affects the picture and its whole point, if I had taken the picture in the morning you would have ignored the trees and focused on the enormous building on the background, but since it was night time the spotlight was all on the trees especially with the lights hitting directly at them. At this point you can barley see the buildings, you can see them but they’re  not that important they don’t stand out as much anymore.

On the second article “The way we live 11-11-01 lost and found” on  the third paragraph the author states “the only skyscrapers visible from your carriage were the legs of adults, but you got to know the ground pretty well and started to wonder why some sidewalks sparkled at certain angles” at a very age we started observing our surroundings and not only that but we started understanding what was what and comparing certain objects or colors and as we grew up it’s like we forgot all about what’s within Nyc and focused on what we have to get done everyday. nature is all over New York but do we actually take the time to walk around and see New Yorks natural beauty? The location of the picture is surrounded by buildings, food spots and office buildings.  Metro tech Commons. is the name of the location where I took the picture of the juxtaposition I found. If you see the map on satellite there is barley and patches of nature near that part of Brooklyn.

 

Project 3 completed

To arrive here ,it’s a 5 minute walk. First you would want to come out of City Tech through the Tillary st. entrance. After that, take a right and walk down the block. Take a left and cross the street towards Jay st., when you pass by McLaughlin park , you will make it to City Tech’s midway building and look across the street and there it is. 

  This is a good example of juxtaposition because it shows two very different pieces of architecture which is the church , looking like it’s mostly made out of brick while we have the the tall modern building which has many windows.

   Walking towards my juxtaposition was quick and it wasn’t as much of an interesting walk, another thing is that I didn’t get to view it in a different position within the area which could’ve given a different type of sense or information. However I checked out a different route on google maps and I went through a preview and the route was interesting, first off you would walk near Brooklyn bridge which would be Adam’s st and then make a right heading to sands st. When you do , the Manhattan bridge comes into sight after that you keep walking until jay st came and the tall building was near the manhattan bridge and more farther down was the church. The article that supports this is “what if you could choose between the fastest route and the most beautiful?” And states 

 “Your commute to work and your walk to the shop don’t have to be so myopic and destination-driven. If you give yourself 10 extra minutes for a small detour on your journey, it can transform your experience of the city into something altogether more enjoyable.” This explains that longer routes can make you view something in a bigger light and affect the way you view the destination your going to,just how the different route was shown in googlemaps. Another article that supports this is “The way we live now:11-11-01;Lost and Found” by Colson Whitehead,  and the author stated “you start building your private New York the first time you lay eyes on it.” This explains how you can view my juxtaposition which is this old brick religious building with the large windows and statues in front , meanwhile we have this largely built modernized building which seems almost transparent by the amount of glass it has which are the windows and both give you that different feel of time periods and the reason they were built, so you as the viewer can make an observation and create your own views and ideas on the city.

Project 3 Completed

 

To get there from city tech, you will have to have to take the R train at Jay Street- Metrotech station to Dekalb Avenue or Atlantic Avenue. Or you can take 20-25 minutes to walk straight from the Jay Street entrance to Fulton street and then walk west until you get to Flatbush Avenue where you will walk southwest for approximately 10 minutes. This is an example of Juxtaposition because some of the buildings in this area are more modern than the others. The Barclays Center is a perfect example of juxtaposition because it juxtaposes the modern shops and skyscrapers with the old and more affordable buildings.

Many neighborhoods in Brooklyn have changed a lot physically throughout recent years. This process, called gentrification is the reason why many neighborhoods look different today compared to what they looked like 10years ago. An area that has been heavily changed by gentrification is Downtown Brooklyn. The rezoning of many stores and the construction of the Barclays Center creates a strong juxtaposition with the modern shops and skyscrapers that surround the Barclays Center and the older, affordable buildings that still remain in the area. The Construction of the Barclay’s Center caused a lot of controversies, a lot of New Yorkers opposed the project. According to Business Insider, “Why Half Of Brooklyn Hates The New Barclay’s Center Stadium” by Joshua Berlinger, a Digital reporter, and producer for CNN, “The entire $4 billion project would use $1.6 billion funding.” This is one of the reasons why many residents were furious with the construction of the Barclays Center and still hold grudges against the City. Many people also argue that the project abused the power of eminent domain which gives the right to the government of the United States to expropriate private property for public use, with compensation often not being what the real value of the properties are.   

One article that supports my project is “Here, Poverty and Privilege Are Neighbors; Income Gaps Are A Source Of Resentment and Guilt BY Janny Scott. In the article, Jenny Scott states “The city  is etched with boundaries and borderlands that appear on no maps, areas where income groups intersect, overlap, collide, coexist– along lines drawn and redrawn by quirks on history, differences in housing stock, patterns of immigration and the economy’s perpetual rise and fall.” I agree with this statement because I feel like when people look at a city on a physical map or even digital map, they don’t see the beauty, diversity and everything else the city has to offer. Someone who does not live in New York City might look at the city on a map and they will not get the same feeling. Later on, in the same article, the author states, “ For some, the juxtaposition is a virtue, one of the city’s fascinations; for others, they are a source of resentment and guilt.” I also agree with this statement because I feel like gentrification can be viewed as a juxtaposition. For a lot of people, gentrification is a source of resentment and guilt because when new people move into a new neighborhood and gentrify it, most of the time the pricing in the area increases, making it hard for those who once lived there to pay bills and afford food. An area that has been drastically changed by gentrification is Downtown Brooklyn. Today, downtown Brooklyn looks more modern than how it looked like 10-20 years ago. Today, downtown Brooklyn looks more like lower Manhattan than the rest of Brooklyn. The construction of the Barclays Center caused a lot of rezoning. More stores relocated their business to downtown Brooklyn because the area became an attraction especially with the Brooklyn Nets basketball team moving from New Jersey to the Barclays Center in Brooklyn which caused the rent to increase in the area and caused many people to be displaced from their homes. The construction of the Barclays Center also increased the traffic in the area. Today, many new skyscrapers are being built in an area that no longer is affordable for many people. Another article that supports my project is “The Way We Live Now: 11-11-01; Lost and Found” By Colson Whitehead. In the article, Whitehead states, I started building my New York on the uptown No. 1 train. My first city memory is of looking out a subway window as the train erupted from the tunnel on the way to 125th Street and palsied up into the elevated tracks.” I could relate to the author, I feel like everyone has their own way of viewing New York. I view downtown Brooklyn different from other people because I grew up in a neighborhood that had more houses than buildings unlike city tech, where there are more movements and more diversity. Also, many people have different experiences depending on where they live. Another article that supports my project is “What If You Could Choose Between The Fastest Route and The Most beautiful?’ by Lex Berko. In the article, the author states, “Your commute to work and your walk to the shop don’t have to be so myopic and destination-driven. If you give yourself 10 extra minutes for a small detour on your journey, it can transform your experience of the city into something altogether more enjoyable.” I agree with the author, personally, I do this all the time. I enjoy taking different routes when I walk from my house to the gym and vice versa. I like taking the long routes because I feel like they put me in a good mood, especially when I’m getting ready to work out I walk by streets that have more trees and where more of nature is seen. I find it more relaxing than walking by noisy traffic; Even though sometimes like to walk where the streets have more pedestrians because It makes it feel less isolated. When I walk to city tech, I take the longer route and I get off at Lawrence street and I walk by Metro Tech Commons because it feels more like a campus and I enjoy seeing people walking their dogs and the large, green trees make the air fresher.

Class Notes 10/29

What juxtapositions can we find in Saul Steinberg’s “View of the World from 9th Avenue” or “View of the World from 9th Avenue”?

we see City/Not City

In the City, we see cars, people (but fewer than we might expect), buildings, water towers, windows of different shapes, parking lot, awning, signs, mailbox, highway. No trees or nature.

In the Not City: multiple countries (Mexico, Canada, China, Japan, Russia) with no detail; Jersey has its own color and border; states and cities are jumbled up and wrong details if any details–not accurate

In this piece, Steinberg argues that …

… what’s outside of NY doesn’t matter to him

… no other place could compare to NY

… what’s inside NY is more important than what’s outside

… he can juxtapose the difference in the details and importance.

By juxtaposing the details and importance between New York and the rest of the world, Steinberg argues that no other place can compare to NY, and that NY’s details matter more than anything outside of NY.

As we read and discuss Janny Scott’s “Here, Poverty And Privilege Are Neighbors; Income Gaps Are a Source Of Resentment and Guilt,” work with your classmates to answer these questions:

What kinds of juxtapositions does Scott write about?

  • building style/use
  • economic diversity: people at either extreme of the wealth/poverty spectrum
  • fascination with difference vs resentment and guilt

What kinds of data does Scott use in her article?

  • top 5th and bottom 5th of the income bracket in a given area
  • top 30 tracts with the biggest income disparity
  • census data
  • immigration data, neighborhood demographics both historical and current

Who are the experts Scott refers to, and how does she let us know their qualifications?

  • Academics
    • Andrew A. Beveridge, sociology prof at Queens College, CUNY
    • William Kornblum, sociology prof at the Graduate Center, CUNY
    • David J. Halle, (prof) sociologist at University of California at Los Angeles but living in NYC
    • Annelise Orleck (see below) (prof)  historian at Dartmouth
  • Residents (former or present) of the neighborhoods
    • Chastity Davis
    • Pablo Aviles
    • Annelise Orleck
    • Mary-Powel Thomas

What is Scott’s argument in the article?

What passages might you quote in Project #3?

What would you use those passages to argue?

 

As we think about Project #3 and our juxtapositions, what is your juxtaposition? what is the SO WHAT? What does it matter that you’re looking at this juxtaposition? Why does this juxtaposition matter?

Juxtaposition project

To get to this place from city tech, you would walk down adams street towards johnson st. When reaching johnson st, make a left and go to jay street. Then make a right and you”ll find this old looking building. This picture shows juxtaposition by this old looking building being here and in the background a taller newer looking building. The material on the reddish, looking building looks way older than the material on the newer, shinier, blue building in the background. The older building at first was the Brooklyn fire headquarters before turning into a place for affordable housing. it was built in 1892. The building went through a renovation that started in 2013 and ended in 2014

Homework Due 10/24

One article that supports my project is “Here, Poverty and Privilege Are Neighbors; Income Gaps Are a Source Of Resentment and Guilt BY Janny Scott. In the article, Jenny Scott states “The city  is etched with boundaries and borderlands that appear on no maps, areas where income groups intersect, overlap, collide, coexist– along lines drawn and redrawn by quirks on history, differences in housing stock, patterns of immigration and the economy’s perpetual rise and fall.” I agree with this statement because I feel like when people look at a city on a physical map or even digital map, they don’t see the beauty, diversity and everything else the city has to offer. Someone who does not live in New York City might look at the city on a map and they will not get the same feeling. Later on, in the same article, the author states, “ For some, the juxtaposition are a virtue, one of the city’s fascinations; for others, they are a source of resentment and guilt.” I also agree with this statement because I feel like gentrification can be viewed as a juxtaposition. For a lot of people, gentrification is a source of resentment and guilt because when new people move into a new neighborhood and gentrify it, most of the time the pricing in the area increases, making it hard for those who once lived there to pay bills and afford food. Another article that supports my project is “The Way We Live Now: 11-11-01; Lost and Found” By Colson Whitehead. In the article, Whitehead states, I started building my New York on the uptown No. 1 train. My first city memory is of looking out a subway window as the train erupted from the tunnel on the way to 125th Street and palsied up into the elevated tracks.” I could relate to the author, I feel like everyone has their own way of viewing New York. I view downtown Brooklyn different from other people because I grew up in a neighborhood that had more houses than buildings unlike city tech, where there are more movements and more diversity. My project might look different than someone who lives in downtown Brooklyn or someone who grew up in a more dense and crowded area. Another article that supports my project is “What If You Could Choose Between The Fastest Route and The Most beautiful?’ by Lex Berko. In the article, the author states, “Your commute to work and your walk to the shop don’t have to be so myopic and destination-driven. If you give yourself 10 extra minutes for a small detour on your journey, it can transform your experience of the city into something altogether more enjoyable.” I agree with the author, personally, I do this all the time. I enjoy taking different routes when I walk from my house to the gym and vice versa. I like taking the long routes because I feel like they put me in a good mood, especially when I’m getting ready to work out I walk by streets that have more trees and where more of nature is seen. I find it more relaxing than walking by noisy traffic; Even though sometimes like to walk where the streets have more pedestrians because It makes it feel less isolated. When I walk to city tech, I take the longer route and I get off at Lawrence street and I walk by Metro Tech Commons because it feels more like a campus and I enjoy seeing people walking their dogs and the large, green trees make the air fresher.

Juxtaposition Project

This is a perfect example to represent juxtaposition. The juxtaposition here shows two buildings made in different years. The building on the left looks a little bit old meanwhile the building on the right looks newer. The contrast between these two buildings is totally different. The building on the left has more colors and the windows are more geometric but old. On the other hand, the building on the right has a solid grey color. The windows are skinnier and much taller than the building on the left. Also, the materials were made differently. As you can see the building on the left is made out of brick and the building on the right is made out of a different wall.

To reach this area from City Tech, walk up to Jay St. It is extremely near the Jay St MetroTech station/Starbucks. This location is also across the Kings County Family Court. The right building is New York University Tandon School of Engineering. It used to be another building, however, NYU bought it in the year 2014. It was not very long ago. Way before NYU bought the building it was called Brooklyn Collegiate and Polytechnic Institute. This college was made in the year 1854. If you’re curious about the history of this college click here.

Juxtaposition Project

 

Juxtaposition

 

 

 

 

 

To get there from city tech, you will have to have to take the R train at Jay Street- Metrotech station to Dekalb Avenue or Atlantic Avenue where you will then transfer to the Q or B train and take it to Avenue J. After you get off at Avenue J in Brooklyn, you will take the B6 or B11 bus right outside of the subway station to Campus Rd where one of the buses will take you directly to the front of the building. This is an example of Juxtaposition because the building on the left looks older and is covered in plants and flowers. The building on the left looks older compared to the modern and remodeled buildings that have been built around the area.

Juxtaposition Project

To reach this location from City Tech, walk along Tillary St. then once you come across Cadman Plaza Park. From here walk through Cadman Plaza Park, passing the Brooklyn War Memorial. Near the end of Cadman Plaza Park, where Cadman Plaza W and Prospect St. meet there will be a path to walk down Old Fulton St. Following the Old Fulton St. path walk under the Brooklyn Bridge and continue walking straight, past Jane’s Carousel and you will end up in this location.

Whenever I have more than a two-hour break, I take some time to walk along the waterfront. I come here to calm myself with the familiar scent of the waters and the sound of waves crashing against the rocks. During my recent long period break, I saw two ships on the water sailing past one another. The juxtaposition in the image above is of these two passing ships on the East River. The one on the left is much smaller and pristine compared to the one of the right which is much larger and looks worn out. These vessels are both used on the water, but they serve different duties. Since the smaller one is a ferry boat transporting people from one destination to another. The larger one which I presume is a barge that is currently transporting goods.

juxtaposition project

From City Tech you would walk to The Supreme Court. From there would walk down Pierrepont St. past the Brooklyn Historic Society. There you wil spot a cathedral and a white building across the street from it. The juxtaposition is the old brick cathedral and the new marble building. The contrast between the two is that the cathedral is old fashioned and historic meanwhile the white building is more contemporary. It may be a house for someone to live in.