Tag Archives: academicResearch

Why is academic writing so academic?

The academic writing is the way it ┬áis because neither journalists or professors got together to make a stand for a new way of writing it. That type of writing has been there and they got comfortable with it. Sometimes outsiders, have tried to make a change by but the change never went through. Nicholas Kristof in our case claimed that professors don’t use enough social media which would make their writings less serious, more funny, and less nerdy. The main reason why the academic writing stays so academic isn’t professors choice, it is the system that produces academic knowledge and that make it more marginal.

Academic Research

Academic research is a privilege because only the few, usually institutions, who can afford to pay for access to it are able to use the most up-to-date research findings and information. Academic and research institutions are more likely to have access to research and peer review journals due to the high yearly costs, normally ranging from $10,000 to $25,000, that would prevent most individuals from being able to afford to pay for access to the journals. If academic research were a right, then there would be significantly less to no cost for access to the most up-to-date journals. (Today, there are financial cost even on things that we consider to be within our rights; for example, we have the right to a trial, but lawyers need to be paid and there are court fees. Usually the tax payers “flip the bill.”)

We can leverage the academic research privilege by contributing to public resources like Wikipedia, which will provide free and easy access to information that someone has obtained from using an “out-of-reach” academic research journal (properly cited of course). This would allow a large number of individuals, who are unable to obtain that academic research, to be able to have access to these priceless/invaluable research resources. Resources like Wikipedia, would facilitate a way to avoid huge fees and be a way, a “loop hole,” around the money barrier that would grant free and unlimited access to any researcher.