Final Hotel Design Project

Final Hotel Design Project

Harry Shapiro

Hospitality Management

Services Marketing & Management

Activity Description: Provide a brief description of the activity

Students create a blog post that contains the conceptual design of a hotel that has a specific place-based location. They will design services for their hotel along with a service delivery system (Heskett, 1994), and elements of a servicescape (Bitner, 1992). They will also explore how information about this hotel will be brought to market; they must contemplate how they will create marketing messages for the hotel. They will use the hotel to explore the interdependencies between services management and marketing. Students will be given an example outline, and an example of a completed assignment.

This is the fifth of five related assignments and it will be used by the students as the input to a final summative exam.

Learning Goals: What do you aim to achieve with this activity?

Students will create a blog post. Critical Reasoning about Ethics will play a major role in crafting this post; such thinking will help students understand and balance the diverse needs of guests, staff and management.

However, there are additional and overlapping goals and objectives including place based learning, and storytelling. This activity will use a peer reviewed critical thinking (around Ethical issues) rubric to help the students understand the complex balance that must be achieved in consideration of the needs of the staff, the customers, the managers, and the owners when designing, managing, and marketing a service.

Ultimately they should be able to demonstrate that if staff are not properly treated, the guests will not be treated well and they will have a hard time marketing their property; inversely when they go above in beyond in caring for staff, not only will it help improve guest experiences it will help the hotel "market itself." They will also make it clear how the Servicescape of the hotel plays a role in the treatment of guests and staff, but also in how the hotel is able to "auto-magically create its own marketing."

Services management is often an futile attempt to brindle, constrain, and restrict the activities of staff while demanding impeccable service delivery — Heskett (1994) turns this on it's head by making it clear that management must first create an impeccable workspace for the staff (the Service Profit Chain) if they wish to have an effective and impeccable service delivery system. Bitner (1992) makes it clear that the space in which the service is delivered also plays a key role in the service delivery. Bitner's work pre-dates the Instagram Selfie, the smartphone, and the selfie stick — yet a property with an excellent servicescape will generate its own inbound marketing (Shah, & Halligan, 2005).

The final summative assessment for the course will ask students to draw from this assignment; this assignment is asking them to create their own Services Management and Marketing "crayon box" and during their final exam use it to draw-out the learning they have synthesized during the course.

Timing: At what point in the lesson or semester do you use this activity? How much classroom time do you devote to it? How much out-of-class time is expected?

Very little time is to be spent in class on this phase of the assignment. Classroom time will include a discussion of the assignment during week 10, a review of the assignment week 11, and during week 12 a showcase covering how the assignment will be used during the exam week. During week 14 the students will peer review each other's assignments using several rubrics. During week 15 the students will use a print-out of their post as part of their final exam.

Logistics: What preparation is needed for this activity? What instructions do you give students? Is the activity low-stakes, high-stakes, or something else?

The prior assignments should help students prepare for this assignment.

Prior Blogging Assignments
* Design a Dish
* Design a Signature Dish
* Design a Hotel (Group Assignment)
* Design a Customer Relationship Management Process (group)
* Design a Hotel (Individual Assignment) ← This assignment

The instructions are found here:

Example Individual Hotel Concept

Assessment: How do you assess this activity? What assessment measures do you use? Do you use a VALUE rubric? If not, how did you develop your rubric? Is your course part of the college-wide general education assessment initiative?

Students will peer review with several rubrics including the Ethical Reasoning Value Rubric. The instructors assessment using the Ethical Reasoning Value Rubric will also be submitted to the school.

Since this activity is a precursor to the final and summative assessment for the course, the assignment will be "graded" during this assessment. The course is a writing intensive course.

Reflection: How well did this activity work in your classroom? Would you repeat it? Why or why not? What challenges did you encounter, and how did you address them? What, if anything, would you change? What did students seem to enjoy about the activity?

I have completed parts 1 – 4 (see below); it has worked effectively. Students have demonstrably been able synthesize the learning outcomes from the course into real world examples. A challenge to this specific was the negative reaction to the detailed nature of the assignment. This negative reaction was discussed openly and compassionately; I presented a counter narrative discussing how since this was part of the final exam, they were better off with an assignment that gives them five weeks to complete it vs. having to craft it only within the time allowed during an exam. Most students accepted the "open book" and "take-home" nature of the assignment. Prior assignments included

* Design a Dish
* Design a Signature Dish
* Design a Hotel (Group Assignment)
* Design a Customer Relationship Management Process (group)

Additional Information: Please share any additional comments and further documentation of the activity – e.g. assignment instructions, rubrics, examples of student work, etc. These can be links to pages or posts on the OpenLab.

Please share a helpful link to a pages or post on the OpenLab

https://openlab.citytech.cuny.edu/service-product-design/category/one/

Designing New Services

Designing New Services

Harry Shapiro

Hospitality

Services Marketing & Management

Activity Description: Provide a brief description of the activity

Students working in groups are requested to design a new hotel with the business or economic goal of service a specific class of customers. For example: high school students on a class trip, teams from start-ups that are traveling together for business, groups of millenial age friends who are traveling together, LGBTQ travels, folks who have any disability covered by ADA who are traveling for business or pleasure.

Specifically the students are to create several services within the hotel that are designed to appeal to the travel, describe a Servicescape for those services to "live within," and use the Service Profit Chain (SPC) to create rewards, tools and other innovations to find, hire, and create an awesome team of staff and managers.

Learning Goals: What do you aim to achieve with this activity?

The objective is for students to use critical thinking and pull-in much of what they know about hospitality to design amazing servicescapes that can support amazing new and innovative services and use the tools offered within the SPC to insure that those services are delivered effectively and efficiently.

Timing: At what point in the lesson or semester do you use this activity? How much classroom time do you devote to it? How much out-of-class time is expected?

Throughout including the first few weeks, after the mid-term, and again towards the end of the course. In case students will have 20-30 minutes in groups. The groups are based on the normal table seating. However, diff. exercises will mix and match the students so they can interact and engage with the entire class through the exercise.

Logistics: What preparation is needed for this activity? What instructions do you give students? Is the activity low-stakes, high-stakes, or something else?

Students should be current on reading. There is both instructor assigned reading and self assigned materials.

Assessment: How do you assess this activity? What assessment measures do you use? Do you use a VALUE rubric? If not, how did you develop your rubric? Is your course part of the college-wide general education assessment initiative?

The goal is to refine this over the course of the term. There are several initial assessments verbally in class as well as peer assessments.

The core exercise is going to be a critical part of the final exam which will offer a summative assessment assessment: have students learned how servicescapes and the SCP work together? Have students learned how the design of a new service impacts staff & customers. How students learned how to design innovative management and reward structures to support their innovative new services.

Reflection: How well did this activity work in your classroom? Would you repeat it? Why or why not? What challenges did you encounter, and how did you address them? What, if anything, would you change? What did students seem to enjoy about the activity?

It is going well. This is the firs term

Additional Information: Please share any additional comments and further documentation of the activity – e.g. assignment instructions, rubrics, examples of student work, etc. These can be links to pages or posts on the OpenLab.

Please see the examples from class.

Please share a helpful link to a pages or post on the OpenLab

Table Research

Table Research

Harry Shapiro

Hospitality Management

HGMT 3502

Activity Description: Provide a brief description of the activity

Students "hear" a discussion about solving management problems/issues but don't really understand what that means. It's the difference between writing a paper that explains why recycling is needed (which is hardly original), vs. designing a recycling program for a business that needs such a plan..

"Research" is a tough course to teach for a variety of reasons including that most students have a deeply held concept of what it means to write a research report. In short most feel it means read what a few folks have said about a topic and repeat it back using lot's of quotes.

HGMT 3502 Hospitality Management Research Seminar – is focused on students finding original solutions to *management problems* within the industry.

While there are many ways to continue research from a in depth literature review, statistical analysis of secondary data, or going through the IRB process and collect primary data — 100% the best way for a hospitality management student to do original research is to find a management issue some place where they work, or have worked, and solve it!

Learning Goals: What do you aim to achieve with this activity?

The goal of this activity is to ask students in small groups to define what are and what are not "management issues and problems" and to understand the scoping issue between "a global issue" like fair wages and a "management issue" — how to help a specific business implement a fair wage policy that doesn't pay (for example) women less money (for the same job) as men.

Timing: At what point in the lesson or semester do you use this activity? How much classroom time do you devote to it? How much out-of-class time is expected?

1st class — first 1/2 of the first class. About 20 minutes.

Logistics: What preparation is needed for this activity? What instructions do you give students? Is the activity low-stakes, high-stakes, or something else?

I will read from the syllabus to explain why HGMT is focused on solving "management issues" and identify a few examples. Then I will ask each group to find 1 more example. Each group will present their example(s).

I will provide a list of global issues and a rubric for evaluating if it has been transformed into a management issue.

Then as a follow-up each group will be given more time to find "new" global issues and a corresponding management issue.

Assessment: How do you assess this activity? What assessment measures do you use? Do you use a VALUE rubric? If not, how did you develop your rubric? Is your course part of the college-wide general education assessment initiative?

Teamwork and collaboration: are the groups dominated by a single student or are they as a group working through the problem.

Finding answers that fit into the rubric of a management issue.

Reflection: How well did this activity work in your classroom? Would you repeat it? Why or why not? What challenges did you encounter, and how did you address them? What, if anything, would you change? What did students seem to enjoy about the activity?

Instructure Eval:
Discussion: post even discussion about possible topics and the focus of original research –> have students understood the scoping issue.

Student "want" to write about one or more very broad topics which they can discuss with little depth and details; whereas a typically successful paper covers one very narrow topic in super depth and detail.

Additional Information: Please share any additional comments and further documentation of the activity – e.g. assignment instructions, rubrics, examples of student work, etc. These can be links to pages or posts on the OpenLab.

If students don't really understand what type of paper is required from them, they can't really pick a topic.

They (typically) pick global topics of interest to them (recycling, diversity, etc.) but the rarely go to the next level and pick a narrowly scoped topic that allows to solve a problem with actionable details.

Please share a helpful link to a pages or post on the OpenLab

BINGO: Technical Term Identification, Recognition, and Employment in an Interactive Format

BINGO: Technical Term Identification, Recognition, and Employment in an Interactive Format

Karen Goodlad

Hospitaltity Management/School of Professional Studies

Wine and Beverage Management

Activity Description: Provide a brief description of the activity

This activity is a way to engage students in their pre-class reading, in-class knowledge development, and post class review. To play BINGO, students will fill-in a BINGO grid with technical terms, statements, or questions about the subject mater (the teacher should complete 5-7 boxes as an exemplar). During class students will listen for information to help define the term, complete the statement, or answer the question. When a row of information is both filled in and answered then the student yells "BINGO".

Learning Goals: What do you aim to achieve with this activity?

Development of technical term identification, recognition, and employment.

Timing: At what point in the lesson or semester do you use this activity? How much classroom time do you devote to it? How much out-of-class time is expected?

The activity will span the length of the class session. Allow 10 minutes at the start of the class for students to review the notes they prepared during their pre-class reading (or the BINGO form can be completed as homework). Proceed with class as normal, when a student yells BINGO the teacher will take a minute to check their work.

This activity can be used at any point in the semester and is best for development of highly technical terms.

Logistics: What preparation is needed for this activity? What instructions do you give students? Is the activity low-stakes, high-stakes, or something else?

To Do:
Create BINGO Grid
Create instructions for students to complete the grid
Explain how BINGO is achieved (a row of boxes must be filled in and completed)

This is a low stakes, in-class activity.

Assessment: How do you assess this activity? What assessment measures do you use? Do you use a VALUE rubric? If not, how did you develop your rubric? Is your course part of the college-wide general education assessment initiative?

If the boxes of the grid are complete then the student is prepared for class the material.
If the student answers the questions or phrases throughout the class session then that is an indication they they are engaged with the lecture and discussion. This is an example of formative assessment.

Reflection: How well did this activity work in your classroom? Would you repeat it? Why or why not? What challenges did you encounter, and how did you address them? What, if anything, would you change? What did students seem to enjoy about the activity?

At first the students were confused and apprehensive. As class progressed it was evident that they were engaged. By the end of class students were excited about how much they learned (completing the grid made it easy to see the knowledge they developed). Students approached me after class to say they appreciated the creativity needed to develop and execute the activity.

Additional Information: Please share any additional comments and further documentation of the activity – e.g. assignment instructions, rubrics, examples of student work, etc. These can be links to pages or posts on the OpenLab.

Please share a helpful link to a pages or post on the OpenLab

Restaurant Manager’s Operational Challenge

Restaurant Manager’s Operational Challenge

Rosa Abreu

Hospitality Management

Restaurant Management

Activity Description: Provide a brief description of the activity

This is part of a scaffold assignment that incorporates a number of discipline specific to Student Learning Outcomes. This portion, a case study, focused on the Student Learning Outcomes of Ethical Reasoning.

The case study is design to place senior students in an operational challenge with the restaurant staff.

Learning Goals: What do you aim to achieve with this activity?

The larger outcome will be for students to evaluate the overall impact of the case study to the industry.

Here students will be assessed with the Rubric of Ethical Reasoning, Communication, discipline specific.

Timing: At what point in the lesson or semester do you use this activity? How much classroom time do you devote to it? How much out-of-class time is expected?

When in the semester, this case study is in relation to the larger project, the groups will have 25 minutes to complete.

Logistics: What preparation is needed for this activity? What instructions do you give students? Is the activity low-stakes, high-stakes, or something else?

The preparation will be, reading the scenario and background of the case. Students will be place in a small groups and they are to write solutions to the case study. This activity will be consider low stakes.

Assessment: How do you assess this activity? What assessment measures do you use? Do you use a VALUE rubric? If not, how did you develop your rubric? Is your course part of the college-wide general education assessment initiative?

I will use the Ethical Reasoning Rubric

Reflection: How well did this activity work in your classroom? Would you repeat it? Why or why not? What challenges did you encounter, and how did you address them? What, if anything, would you change? What did students seem to enjoy about the activity?

This activity will be implemented in Fall 2017

Additional Information: Please share any additional comments and further documentation of the activity – e.g. assignment instructions, rubrics, examples of student work, etc. These can be links to pages or posts on the OpenLab.

Please share a helpful link to a pages or post on the OpenLab

Evaluating a Research Article

Evaluating a Research Article

Susan Phillip

Hospitality Management

Research Seminar HMGT 3502

Activity Description: Provide a brief description of the activity

Research Seminar Assignment HMGT3502

Perceptions of the Importance and Preparedness of Interpersonal Communication
Skills of the Entry-Level Hospitality Leader: Implications for Hospitality Educators
By Jeff Lolli http://web.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=5a7c103b-b208-4719-a5af-4cb9f853a0ae%40sessionmgr4004&vid=1&hid=4201

1. Read the article provided in the link above by logging into City Tech’s library’s website
2. Why do you think it is necessary to log in to the library to get this article?
3. Read the article and write a 100-150-word summary of the article that accurately conveys its purpose.
4. When was the work published?
5. Who is the audience and how do you know?
6. In what kind of research can this source be useful?
7. Does the work meet the standards to be considered an academic/scholarly source? How do you know?
8. Are the qualifications of the author appropriate for an academic article? Briefly describe the authors’ qualifications.
9. Restate the purpose of the paper in your own words. Do you think it is clearly stated? Why?
10. How can the bibliography of the article be used in research?

Learning Goals: What do you aim to achieve with this activity?

The goal of the assignment is for students to critically assess the quality of a source and the value of the source to their research.

Timing: At what point in the lesson or semester do you use this activity? How much classroom time do you devote to it? How much out-of-class time is expected?

Information sources are discussed very early in the semester and the assignment follows the discussion. It is an out of class assignment.

Logistics: What preparation is needed for this activity? What instructions do you give students? Is the activity low-stakes, high-stakes, or something else?

Students will have library instruction before this assignment.l

Assessment: How do you assess this activity? What assessment measures do you use? Do you use a VALUE rubric? If not, how did you develop your rubric? Is your course part of the college-wide general education assessment initiative?

Reflection: How well did this activity work in your classroom? Would you repeat it? Why or why not? What challenges did you encounter, and how did you address them? What, if anything, would you change? What did students seem to enjoy about the activity?

It works very well and I will repeat it.

Additional Information: Please share any additional comments and further documentation of the activity – e.g. assignment instructions, rubrics, examples of student work, etc. These can be links to pages or posts on the OpenLab.

Please share a helpful link to a pages or post on the OpenLab

Greenmarket ingredient photo essay

Greenmarket ingredient photo essay

Alejandro Cantagallo

Hospitality Management/Professional Studies

Introduction to Food and Beverage Management

Activity Description: Provide a brief description of the activity

Assume the role of a purchaser for a restaurant and visit a Greenmarket and look for a fruit or vegetable that you are not familiar with, strike up a conversation with the people at the stand and describe in detail what the products is, how it is grown, who grows it and under what circumstances. With this information write a persuasive argument for the chef about why she/he should use the product. The assignment should include research about how the food item is grown and used, a statement about why it caught your attention and details about the farm that it is grown on that should include the name and location of the farm as well the name of the person that you spoke to. This assignment is to be posted on the Openlab as a photo essay and must include at least one photo of the product and you are encouraged to post a selfie with the stand worker/farmer as well as other relevant media. Your photo essay should be between 500 words, should include at least one photo and active working links to any companies, organizations or people mentioned where applicable.

Learning Goals: What do you aim to achieve with this activity?

•To have students engage professionals about what they do and why and how
•To use various methods to research and describe something that they knew little or nothing about before the assignment
•To integrate the various sources of research to piece together a narrative that is concise
•To effectively use the openlab by posting a blog entry that includes various steps and specific formatting rules

Timing: At what point in the lesson or semester do you use this activity? How much classroom time do you devote to it? How much out-of-class time is expected?

This assignment is assigned on the first day of class and is due on the 7 or 8th week to correspond with our classroom discussions about purchasing and defining value. I typically schedule a field trip to the Union Square Market with the intention of offering a tour and giving the students a chance to take care of the assignment. Students are welcome to visit other markets though. We will spend about 2 hours total of classroom time and students will only need about an hour of extra-class time to complete the project if they choose not to participate or miss the field trip.

Logistics: What preparation is needed for this activity? What instructions do you give students? Is the activity low-stakes, high-stakes, or something else?

Students need to either visit a market or attend the field trip. They need to have an openlab account and have requested membership to the classes site. Students will need to have a way to upload photos to the openlab. This is a low stakes assignment that ties into our broader course material as a way to enhance the conversation about food systems and food procurement/sourcing and value

Assessment: How do you assess this activity? What assessment measures do you use? Do you use a VALUE rubric? If not, how did you develop your rubric? Is your course part of the college-wide general education assessment initiative?

Yes I use the Information Literacy Rubric

Reflection: How well did this activity work in your classroom? Would you repeat it? Why or why not? What challenges did you encounter, and how did you address them? What, if anything, would you change? What did students seem to enjoy about the activity?

I have not administered this assignment in its current form yet, but in the past I have seen some good results, albeit with room for improvement.

Additional Information: Please share any additional comments and further documentation of the activity – e.g. assignment instructions, rubrics, examples of student work, etc. These can be links to pages or posts on the OpenLab.

Please share a helpful link to a pages or post on the OpenLab

Research Project Peer Critique

Research Project Peer Critique

Ellen Kim

Hospitality Management

Hospitality Management Research Seminar

Activity Description: Provide a brief description of the activity

This activity is designed to provide students with an opportunity to conduct self-assessment on their research project and to receive feedback from their peers as well as the instructor. Students will perform self-assessment on their assignments, (1) Problem Statement & Thesis Statement and (2) Draft, using the rubrics provided by the instructor upon completion of the assignments. The homework submitted via Blackboard will be, then, evaluated by classmates by one week after the deadline. In addition to the instructor’s assessment, evaluating students need to provide the complete rubrics along with suggestions for improvement. Reviewers and reviewees will be paired up during the class period to clarify the feedback and to discuss further about the arguments established.

Learning Goals: What do you aim to achieve with this activity?

• Identify and evaluate the clarity of the research problem statement.
• Determine the theoretical or logical rationale of the research problem.
• Appraise the thoroughness and relevance of the literature review.
• Assess the credibility of the research (application of APA citation).
• Assess the theoretical perspectives and/or appropriate assumptions of the researchers.
• Assess the clarity and consistency of the results.
• Strengthen writing skills.

Timing: At what point in the lesson or semester do you use this activity? How much classroom time do you devote to it? How much out-of-class time is expected?

This exercise consists of two phases:
1) Phase 1 (Problem Statement & Thesis Statement): Students will be asked to submit the formulated problem statement and thesis statement in Week 4. Peer evaluation will be completed by Week 5 and class discussion will follow for about 15 minutes in Week 5.
2) Phase 2 (Draft): The research draft following APA citation is due Week 10 and peer assessment is due Week 11. Peer discussion will be done in Week 11.

Logistics: What preparation is needed for this activity? What instructions do you give students? Is the activity low-stakes, high-stakes, or something else?

This exercise needs clearly defined grading rubrics and an instruction on how to grade students’ work with the rubrics should be provided to students during the class period.

Assessment: How do you assess this activity? What assessment measures do you use? Do you use a VALUE rubric? If not, how did you develop your rubric? Is your course part of the college-wide general education assessment initiative?

Existing grading rubrics will be refined for this exercise. Students will use the updated rubrics for self-assessment and peer-review.

Reflection: How well did this activity work in your classroom? Would you repeat it? Why or why not? What challenges did you encounter, and how did you address them? What, if anything, would you change? What did students seem to enjoy about the activity?

I ran a pilot test of this activity in Spring 2016. I found that students could gain various perspectives on tourism issues for investigation in a dynamic environment.

Additional Information: Please share any additional comments and further documentation of the activity – e.g. assignment instructions, rubrics, examples of student work, etc. These can be links to pages or posts on the OpenLab.

Please share a helpful link to a pages or post on the OpenLab