Social Media Review

Social Media Review

Denise Sutton

Business/School of Professional Studies

Essentials of Marketing (MKT 1100)

Activity Description: Provide a brief description of the activity

Students work in small groups of three. Each group will choose a Fortune 500 company that has a “corporate responsibility” (or philanthropy) component as part of its brand identity. The group will identify three social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or YouTube) and will analyze the company’s use of social media using a SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats). Each student will focus on one platform and collaborate on findings. The group will make recommendations to the company’s Communication Office team.

Learning Goals: What do you aim to achieve with this activity?

The purpose of this assignment is to analyze the effectiveness of social media as a marketing tool and to identify the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats in order to make recommendations to the company Communications Office. Suggestions may include ways to improve connection to the consumer, content and consumer engagement, and to identify problems and/or inconsistencies between messaging and brand identity—especially as it relates to its social responsibility programming. Students will address Gen Ed Student Learning Outcomes associated with ethical reasoning skills.

Timing: At what point in the lesson or semester do you use this activity? How much classroom time do you devote to it? How much out-of-class time is expected?

This activity is assigned approximately two-thirds of the way into the semester. Students will have read the chapters on digital marketing, corporate governance, and the marketing mix/SWOT analysis—all components of this assignment. Two classroom periods are dedicated to this assignment. Research and writing done outside of classroom.

Logistics: What preparation is needed for this activity? What instructions do you give students? Is the activity low-stakes, high-stakes, or something else?

This is a low-stakes assignment. Students will have read textbook material and case studies (and discussed this material in class) that connect to and inform this assignment.

Assessment: How do you assess this activity? What assessment measures do you use? Do you use a VALUE rubric? If not, how did you develop your rubric? Is your course part of the college-wide general education assessment initiative?

Students will address Gen Ed Student Learning Outcomes associated with ethical reasoning skills, mainly in the first three categories (ethical self-awareness, understanding different ethical perspectives/concepts, and ethical issue recognition).

Ethical Reasoning Skills (student recognizes basic ethical issues, student states position, student states core belief):
• How are consumer complaints handled? Amount of time it takes company to respond, appropriateness of response, follow-up, etc;
• What is the company mission statement? Is the company’s core mission evident in all messaging/content?
• How effective is the company’s philanthropic messaging? Is it consistent? Engaging?
• Are consumer’s engaged?
• Are company privacy policies transparent?

In addition, students identify ethical issues, which may include:
• Privacy concerns
• Issues of transparency regarding company governance and policies
• Consumer relations/consumer rights
• Use of social media in communication crises (e.g., the Starbucks racial incident in Philadelphia)
• The ethics of framing stories/content (e.g., point of view, including different and even opposing views, etc.)

Ethical Reasoning Performance Criteria met in this assignment: Ethical self-awareness, understanding different ethical perspectives/concepts, ethical issue recognition. Meet benchmark one, and perhaps some of milestone two.

*Ethical Awareness Steps: Awareness, identification of stakeholders, identification and review of resources, identify and consider multiple solutions, reflect, take action. The students will go through each step with the exception of the final “take action” step.

MKT 1100 Student Learning Outcomes—General Education
In this assignment, the students are:

1) Using the ability to use the arts and humanities as a forum for the study of values and ethical principles;
2) Demonstrating intellectual honesty and personal responsibility;
3) Discerning the consequences of decisions and actions;

Rubric for grade evaluation:
1. Analysis (Details? Level of sophistication? Shows recognition and understanding of social media ethical issues?) 25%
2. Recommendations (Are they creative, do they add value?) 25%
3. Quality of writing (Clear, concise, well-organized?) 25%
4. Quality of presentation (Clear, concise, enthusiastic, engaging, quality of response to questions?) 25%

Reflection: How well did this activity work in your classroom? Would you repeat it? Why or why not? What challenges did you encounter, and how did you address them? What, if anything, would you change? What did students seem to enjoy about the activity?

New assignment: Fall 2018.

Additional Information: Please share any additional comments and further documentation of the activity – e.g. assignment instructions, rubrics, examples of student work, etc. These can be links to pages or posts on the OpenLab.

Please share a helpful link to a pages or post on the OpenLab

Network Brand (The Manifesto pt1)

Network Brand (The Manifesto pt1)

George Larkins

Communication Design

COMD 3521 Motion Design 1

Activity Description: Provide a brief description of the activity

Students are to create a manifesto designed to launch their network. Here is where it all starts. Where they have to look within themselves and develop the courage to share their beliefs with the world. I have them start off with what they believe and what they know to be true. Ex. I believe that racism is real. I know that discrimination exists in this society.

Learning Goals: What do you aim to achieve with this activity?

My aim here is to create an environment of ethical and honest reasoning designed to withstand the pressure that business demands. In addition to aid in rebuilding their self-belief system.

Timing: At what point in the lesson or semester do you use this activity? How much classroom time do you devote to it? How much out-of-class time is expected?

This project is part of their final. We devote two entire class sessions dealing with this. Out of class time is constantly encouraged. What I tell them is the more time you spend on a subject, the better it will become. If time permits, I share with them a video of the “Long Game, part 2.” https://vimeo.com/87448006

Logistics: What preparation is needed for this activity? What instructions do you give students? Is the activity low-stakes, high-stakes, or something else?

The instructions for this exercise is to start with a list of beliefs. What would do be doing right now in your perfect world? Are you preparing yourself go along with the future or are you preparing yourself to help shape the future? Do you believe that you can have an impact on this planet? Who are your design heroes, and why? And in order to do this, they have to develop the skills the right questions, not only questions from other people but of themselves as well. And have the courage to ask and answer honestly.

Assessment: How do you assess this activity? What assessment measures do you use? Do you use a VALUE rubric? If not, how did you develop your rubric? Is your course part of the college-wide general education assessment initiative?

I will use the creative thinking value rubric. I believe it fits this activity well.

Reflection: How well did this activity work in your classroom? Would you repeat it? Why or why not? What challenges did you encounter, and how did you address them? What, if anything, would you change? What did students seem to enjoy about the activity?

The activity went well, and yes, I will be repeating it. Why, because I believe it is an important skill set to have. That is having the courage to ask questions, be asked questions and give honest answers. My challenge has been getting students to manage the fear of being put in the spotlight. I address that issue by having students give their presentation in front of the class. One possibility would be to review some contemporary design and some history so that they would be more aware of the people that came before them. And also aid them in finding someone who could they can follow and be inspired by.

Additional Information: Please share any additional comments and further documentation of the activity – e.g. assignment instructions, rubrics, examples of student work, etc. These can be links to pages or posts on the OpenLab.

The next step here for will be to get more familiar using openLab.

Please share a helpful link to a pages or post on the OpenLab

Clinic Journals

Clinic Journals

Annie Chitlall

School of Professional Studies department of Dental Hygiene/New York City College of Technology

Princinples of Dental Hygiene Care II

Activity Description: Provide a brief description of the activity

Students will write 3 clinic journals in Dental 1200. Each journal will be written on a completed patient. The students will enter the journal on the Den 1200 open lab site. There will be an open discussion between each student and his/her clinic advisor to ensure that the journal has met all the required information listed on the handout/rubric.

Learning Goals: What do you aim to achieve with this activity?

Timing: At what point in the lesson or semester do you use this activity? How much classroom time do you devote to it? How much out-of-class time is expected?

Students will post a clinical journal within 48 hours of patient completion. Clinical journals are to be written after each step of patient care is completed. This activity will not occur in the classroom. Students will need about 2-3 hours out-of-class time to complete these journals if they the recommended timeline is followed.

Logistics: What preparation is needed for this activity? What instructions do you give students? Is the activity low-stakes, high-stakes, or something else?

The students need to be able to demonstrate writing mechanics, understanding, and completeness of the assignment. Writing must be clear, concise, and correct. No spelling or grammatical errors. Extremely well organized. The student must demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of the concepts in the assignment and must address all elements in the assignment in an appropriate length. This activity is low-stakes.

Assessment: How do you assess this activity? What assessment measures do you use? Do you use a VALUE rubric? If not, how did you develop your rubric? Is your course part of the college-wide general education assessment initiative?

There will be a grading rubric for this assignment.

Reflection: How well did this activity work in your classroom? Would you repeat it? Why or why not? What challenges did you encounter, and how did you address them? What, if anything, would you change? What did students seem to enjoy about the activity?

Currently and from previous experience, the students do not follow the recommended timeline and rush to submit the required 3 journal entries on the deadline. The last-minute submissions or journals have not yielded positive results since most entries are missing pertinent information and students do not have an opportunity for open discussion with assigned faculty members. I would repeat this activity but will modify the requirements for submission. Students will develop a better appreciation of this assignment if after each patient care visit there is a required entry for that visit and an evaluation of their goals for a specific aspect of the patient care process was met. Over the semesters the biggest challenge is receiving these journal entries in a timely manner. Most students wait for the deadline date and post their entries at midnight, this does not allow for a discussion and often results in a low grade. Most students seem to enjoy the self-reflection portion of the assignment most.

Additional Information: Please share any additional comments and further documentation of the activity – e.g. assignment instructions, rubrics, examples of student work, etc. These can be links to pages or posts on the OpenLab.

Journal __________ Principles of Dental Hygiene Care II- 1200-Spring 2018

Criteria
4
3
2
1
Score
Completeness
Addresses all elements in the assignment and is of appropriate length
Addresses most of elements in the assignment and is of appropriate length
Missing some minor elements in the assignments
Incomplete in most respects; does not address the assignment properly

Understanding
Demonstrates a sophisticated understanding of the concepts in the assignment
Demonstrates an accomplished understanding of the concepts in the assignment
Demonstrates an acceptable understanding of the concepts in the assignments
Demonstrates an inadequate understanding of concepts in the assignment

Writing Mechanics
Writing is clear, concise, and correct. No spelling or grammatical errors. Extremely well organized.
Writing is clear and concise but may have one or two spelling or grammatical errors. Well organized.
Writing lacks clarity or conciseness and contains numerous spelling and/or grammatical errors.
Writing is unfocused, rambling, or contains serious errors in spelling and/or grammar. Poorly organized

Total:

Grade = 12/12 = 100%
Instructor Comments:

Please share a helpful link to a pages or post on the OpenLab

What Is True/What Is Fake? Journalism Today

What Is True/What Is Fake? Journalism Today

Aaron Barlow

English/Arts & Sciences

Introduction to Journalism

Activity Description: Provide a brief description of the activity

Relation of a story by the professor about an encounter with an elephant (though it can be any story relevant to the instructor’s life that can be verified to some degree, at least, through research). The students are then asked to determine what truth there is in the story, if any, and to justify their conclusions. After the first class, the students are asked to search diligently across the internet for proof/dismissal of the professor’s claims. At the end of the discussion, students vote on the truth (or lack of it) of the story. If they ask the professor to tell them if the vote is correct or not, the response should be a shrug and the comment, “The question is, can you trust me?” This generally leaves the students baffled for a moment but, as the course moves on to other considerations, they generally start to understand.

Learning Goals: What do you aim to achieve with this activity?

Students are expected to come away with an understanding of the limits of classroom authority and of research itself.

Timing: At what point in the lesson or semester do you use this activity? How much classroom time do you devote to it? How much out-of-class time is expected?

This exercise is best done early in the semester. It generally takes a full class period plus a couple of homework hours and then about half an hour of the next class.

Logistics: What preparation is needed for this activity? What instructions do you give students? Is the activity low-stakes, high-stakes, or something else?

The professor needs to prepare relation of the story carefully, including within it enough clues for the students to be able to research the claims made. Students need to be taking notes while the professor talks and need to understand the use that will be made of those notes in the homework assignment. Before beginning to tell the tale, the instructor needs to carefully prepare the students.

Assessment: How do you assess this activity? What assessment measures do you use? Do you use a VALUE rubric? If not, how did you develop your rubric? Is your course part of the college-wide general education assessment initiative?

Because of the nature of this activity, which lies outside of assessment structures and can be harmed by them, this is not assessed.

Reflection: How well did this activity work in your classroom? Would you repeat it? Why or why not? What challenges did you encounter, and how did you address them? What, if anything, would you change? What did students seem to enjoy about the activity?

I have been using and developing this exercise for a decade and in a number of different classes and will continue to do so. It helps students understand the differing reactions, in terms of truth value, to different speakers in different positions. Plus, it introduces them to research tasks of a sort they generally have not encountered in other classes.

Additional Information: Please share any additional comments and further documentation of the activity – e.g. assignment instructions, rubrics, examples of student work, etc. These can be links to pages or posts on the OpenLab.

As part of a book I edited, I include the story I use for this exercise: https://www.academia.edu/888435/Elephant_Morning. When I relate it, I tell it differently, making sure to include dates, places and verifiable events as a basis for student research. The structure of the essay itself comes out, in part, from earlier uses of this exercise–but it also contains its own inaccuracies, liberties taken for the sake of the story. Every instructor has a tale or her or his own that can be used similarly.

Please share a helpful link to a pages or post on the OpenLab

Editorial Illustration Part 1 – Project Research

Editorial Illustration Part 1 – Project Research

Sara Woolley Gómez

Communication Design

Illustration 1

Activity Description: Provide a brief description of the activity

This activity is the introductory assignment of a scaffolded project, in which students create an Editorial Illustration for use to accompany an article in a magazine, printed or online. The project is broken into stages with peer critique and feedback given at each stage, spanning 4 weeks in total.

Part 1 Editorial Illustration Research:

1- Open with a Collaborative Learning Activity:

Rapid Fire Discussion: What do we care about?

There is a sterotype that young people are unaware or unconcerned with social issues and current events.
• Do you agree or disagree with this statement?
• Are there issues or events which you are particularly passionate about?

5 minute Brain Dump:
• In teams, grab a piece of chalk and fill the black board with a brainstorm of every issue you care about.
• If another student’s answer sparks an idea, draw a line to link the ideas.
• There are no wrong answers, but be sure to read before you write! No doubles allowed!

End with a 5 minute Reflection

2- IN-CLASS ASSIGNMENT : Editorial Illustration Research

Research: Find an article from a legitimate news source, online or printed, about a topic which you are passionate about or find particularly interesting, as source material for your editorial illustration. Carefully read and analyze those articles.

Brainstorm: Using the Word Stack method taught in an earlier assignment, students will write down all of the key words they can think of relating to the article. They then build out from those key word forming stacks, and make bridges between any concepts that they find related. For example, by theme, color, shape, etc. This part is entirely personal and represents part of their unique artistic lens.

Write: Students author a blog post on open lab in response to the article. Key stakeholders are identified. Who does this issue matter to and why? Students share the article as well as their brainstorm with their peers.

Discuss: Students prepare a brief presentation of their chosen article and brainstorm.

Presentation: Students present their findings to their peers, showing all related materials through the open lab. 3 minutes per student with an additional 2 minute Q&A.

Learning Goals: What do you aim to achieve with this activity?

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOME
Students discuss / analyze core beliefs and the origins of the core belief.
Analyze content and evaluate evidence
Apply critical thinking skills to make creative inferences
Evaluate different ethical perspectives and concepts
Respect and Use Creativity

Timing: At what point in the lesson or semester do you use this activity? How much classroom time do you devote to it? How much out-of-class time is expected?

This activity is the introductory assignment of a 4 part scaffolded project, Editorial Illustration. We begin this month long project midway through the semester. It builds upon knowledge gained from two preceding projects, such as illustration professional practices, the revision process, technical skills, and concept development techniques. It also uses a place based learning experience at the New York Society of Illustrators annual show, as a springboard for the assignment.

This activity, project research is an in class activity and purposely designed so to allow opportunity for collaborative learning. It will take the full class session (3 hours) to complete. Students are expected to continue the assignment outside of class during the next three parts of the assignment leading to the final illustration and work process presentation.

Logistics: What preparation is needed for this activity? What instructions do you give students? Is the activity low-stakes, high-stakes, or something else?

This activity does not require a great deal of preparation. As previously noted, the art form of Editorial Illustration is previously introduced through a place based learning experience at the New York Society of Illustrators. Students are not asked to come in with any concept of what they would like to work on. Instead they are to identify issues the care passionately about through collaborative learning with their peers. This also allows them to recognize and discuss multiple perspectives. Then they are to inform their opinions through thorough research. Then finally to present the issue to the class, expressing their views on it, and showing their research and an accompanying brainstorm.

This is a low stakes activity. It in an of itself is not graded, however it contributes to the process development of a high stakes project.

Students are given the following evaluation criteria:

Overall quality of your presentation to the class.
Clarity while explaining the topic you’ve chosen and it's significance.
Quality and depth of the Brainstorm created based on the topic.

• Identify the key stakeholders in the issue.
• Describe your perspective on the issue.
• Describe how different ethical perspectives might be applied.
• Explain your brainstorm, and share any creative insights or inferences it may have sparked.

Assessment: How do you assess this activity? What assessment measures do you use? Do you use a VALUE rubric? If not, how did you develop your rubric? Is your course part of the college-wide general education assessment initiative?

This activity uses a VALUE rubric to access the following learning outcomes:

Self Reflect and Identify personal values and ethics
Analyze content and evaluate evidence
Apply critical thinking skills to make creative inferences
Discern multiple perspectives

In addition I access the following outcomes using the same 4 tiered rating system:

Respect and Use of Creativity.
Overall quality and professionalism of presentation.

Reflection: How well did this activity work in your classroom? Would you repeat it? Why or why not? What challenges did you encounter, and how did you address them? What, if anything, would you change? What did students seem to enjoy about the activity?

This activity description represents a revision of a current assignment in order to improve upon it. Currently students are coming into class after having researched and chosen a topic on their own.

This new structured in class version allows students to learn collaboratively, and to discern multiple perspectives through evaluating the work of their peers.

Students in the current version of the assignment seem to greatly enjoy presenting the issue and their views on it as well as creative work to their peers.

One challenge I encountered was identifying the difference between a legitimate or false news source. At first I dealt with this on an individual basis, but once it had come up for discussion a second time I stopped the class to discuss the difference as a group, leading them to come up with a set of parameters.

In the future I'd structure in the same discussion and provide some better examples.

Additional Information: Please share any additional comments and further documentation of the activity – e.g. assignment instructions, rubrics, examples of student work, etc. These can be links to pages or posts on the OpenLab.

Assignment Instructions:

Editorial Illustration (4 part project)

Overall Project Description:

Create an Editorial Illustration for use to accompany an article in a magazine, printed or online. This project is broken into stages with peer critique and critical feedback given at each stage, spanning 4 weeks in total.

The final illustration must be created using a limited palate of black, white, and one other color and should be made using a combination of traditional drawing / inking skills and digital coloring. Final art should be made to fit the real magazine’s specs. (Approx 9” x12”)

Final work will be judged on the clarity and cleverness of the overall concept, thoughtful utilization of composition, the use of value, and of course the skillfulness of overall technique.
_______________________________________________________

Part 1 of 4

Rapid Fire Discussion: What do we care about?

There is a sterotype that young people are unaware or unconcerned with social issues and current events.
• Do you agree or disagree with this statement?
• Are there issues or events which you are particularly passionate about?

5 minute Brain Dump:
• In teams, grab a piece of chalk and fill the black board with a brainstorm of every issue you care about.
• If another student’s answer sparks an idea, draw a line to link the ideas.
• There are no wrong answers, but be sure to read before you write! No doubles allowed!

IN-CLASS ASSIGNMENT : Editorial Illustration Research

Research: Find an article from a legitimate news source, online or printed, about a topic which you are passionate about or find particularly interesting, as source material for your editorial illustration. Carefully read and analyze those articles.

Brainstorm: Using the Word Stack method we’ve used for earlier assignments, write down all of the key words you can think of related to the article. Be sure to include the actions – what is happening, not just who, what, or where.

Write: A blog post on open lab in response to the article. Identify the key stakeholders. Who does this matter to and why? Highlight particular areas of interest to you. Share the article as well as your brainstorm and any images you may consider using in the future as reference material.

Discuss: Prepare a brief presentation of your chosen article and brainstorm.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOME
Students discuss / analyze core beliefs and the origins of the core belief.
Analyze content and evaluate evidence
Apply critical thinking skills to make creative inferences
Evaluate different ethical perspectives and concepts
Respect and Use Creativity

PURPOSE
Identify personal values and understand how passion to fuels your work.
Listen to the values and consider the perspectives of others.
Understand ethical perspectives.

EVALUATION CRITERIA
Overall quality of your presentation to the class.
Clarity while explaining the topic you’ve chosen and it's significance.
Quality and depth of the Brainstorm created based on the topic.

• Identify the key stakeholders in the issue.
• Describe your perspective on the issue.
• Describe how different ethical perspectives might be applied.
• Explain your brainstorm, and share any creative insights or inferences it may have sparked.

Please share a helpful link to a pages or post on the OpenLab

Editorial Illustration – Process Book Examples

The ethical issue of biomedical engineering

The ethical issue of biomedical engineering

Chen Xu

Computer Engineering Technology

BMET1101

Activity Description: Provide a brief description of the activity

In BMET1101, Introduction to Biomedical Engineering Technology, different subareas of biomedical engineering are introduced. Discuss the new development of prosthetic arm, watch the video of mind controlled robotic arm. Ask students to research about different aspects, such as biomechanics, neural engineering, and biomedical instrumentation, medical imaging. Then move to cyborg (short for "cybernetic organism") in the novel and movies, which is a being with both organic and biomechatronic body parts, such as iron man, spider man, and Darth Vader. Discuss the ethical issues, such as will the artificial devices may affect personal identity and dignity, can human still be held morally responsible for their behavior when their brain has been engineered by others to function in certain way?

Learning Goals: What do you aim to achieve with this activity?

Inspire students to explore the development of technology and critically think about the limit of technology.

Timing: At what point in the lesson or semester do you use this activity? How much classroom time do you devote to it? How much out-of-class time is expected?

At the end of semester. Maybe discuss some topics in one lecture, then let students do more research, revisit the topics again after two or three weeks.

Logistics: What preparation is needed for this activity? What instructions do you give students? Is the activity low-stakes, high-stakes, or something else?

Show some videos, and introduce the background. It’s an open-ended question, write or present as a project.

Assessment: How do you assess this activity? What assessment measures do you use? Do you use a VALUE rubric? If not, how did you develop your rubric? Is your course part of the college-wide general education assessment initiative?

Breadth of knowledge, lifelong learning, inquiry and analysis, integrate learning, ethics and value.

Reflection: How well did this activity work in your classroom? Would you repeat it? Why or why not? What challenges did you encounter, and how did you address them? What, if anything, would you change? What did students seem to enjoy about the activity?

Still in course design stage.

Additional Information: Please share any additional comments and further documentation of the activity – e.g. assignment instructions, rubrics, examples of student work, etc. These can be links to pages or posts on the OpenLab.

Please share a helpful link to a pages or post on the OpenLab