Featured post

Our next meeting: Nov 20 (and some stuff about Gee!)

Hi everyone! So here are some links to info about James Paul Gee’s work on Discourse Communities:

“Literacy, Discourse and Linguistics” an article in which he describes primary and secondary discourse communities. I personally find it fairly accessible and really interesting!

HERE is a slideshow that accentuates many of the main points from that same article. Many typos.

HERE is a website that bullet points Gee’s general theory of Discourse communities

For Nov 20, please write a draft of 1121 Unit 2 (the unit description is attached below– I’ve changed it slightly. Changes are highlighted. I will attach more sample assignments shortly. Please remember to keep Unit 3 in mind as you write this unit– that is, you may want to write Unit 2 as research that leads into Unit 3.

Please also read Cheryl Ball’s “Genre and Transfer in a Multimodal Class” (if you can open the file. I’m working on it) at the bottom of this page. So far, it prints in legit gibberish!

Unit 2. Inquiry-Based Research

The purpose of this inquiry-based research is to spark and deepen student curiosity. In this unit, students will further their research skills, using evidence to make an argument or explore a topic, question, or issue. With this in mind, students should begin research with a question or a hypothesis, but should NOT begin with a thesis! Students will be expected to use the library’s resources and will also have the possibility of conducting interviews or other observation based research. Research will require that students use best attribution practices including gathering, and evaluating of multiple sources, both primary and secondary sources. Students will be asked to synthesize a variety of ideas and sources while they pursue their research goals and questions. The scope and focus of research projects can vary, and can emerge from discourse community projects, genre exploration projects, or other topics that students wish to investigate. Students should be given some choice of genre in this assignment– that is: what genre is best to deliver the research they have accumulated to the audience they wish to reach?

Research assignments can be individual projects or group projects.

UNIT TWO EXAMPLES HERE.

 

(Remember that Unit 3 is a multimodal assignment that asks students to repurpose writing they have done earlier in the semester to a digital genre. Unit 3 should have an element of persuasion. The description of this is posted in the previous blog post)

Download (PDF, 312KB)

 

Featured post

Weds, November 6

Hi everyone! We’ll be meeting next Wednesday, November 6.  In preparation, please review 1121 (yes 21!) UNIT ONE from the packet I handed out last session and write a draft of an assignment that unit– we’ll be workshopping these. Please print out three copies. *

If you are having problems with the copier, (I know this is an ongoing issue) please email them to me at least an hour before the PD. I have recently been absolutely inundated with emails, so please send this as its own email (not as a reply to something else)  write something in the subject line like PLEASE PRINT in all caps. Don’t worry about offending me with curtness. 

Also, we will be going over commenting strategies. If you have a student paper you’d like help commenting on, please bring in three copies. Please remove the student’s name and all identifying information. I can make copies for you if this is an issue.

We will have some time at the beginning of the session to talk about how teaching Unit Two (of 1101) is going in your current classes. If you are feeling pressed for time with the deadlines we gave you this summer, don’t sweat it–needing an extra day or two is okay; I trust you as professors. But do make sure that you leave yourself enough time for Unit 3 and the portfolio.

Handouts: 

Download (PDF, 118KB)

Download (PDF, 193KB)

  (I had to do it in two parts)

Featured post

Wednesday, Oct 23

Hi Everyone! We will reconvene on Wednesday, Oct 23 to talk about grading/ commenting on student essays. In preparation, there will be two readings: the classic (if you’re a Comp geek like me) “Responding to Student Writing” by Nancy Sommers and the very thought-provoking “Beyond Translingual Writing” by Jerry Won Lee.

We’ll be visited by Lubie Alatriste, the head of our ELL department, who will be talking with us about various linguistic and language issues. And we’ll talk about “minimal marking” strategies and other strategies that have worked for us when commenting on student papers. I’ll also be asking you about your commenting persona, if that makes sense: who are you trying to be in your comments? A coach, a buddy, a judge, etc… So think about that a little bit throughout the week.

We’ll be back in the President’s Conference Room, where we met last time– because we’re fancy. 4 pm as always.

Featured post

PD Next Week– Readings added

Hi!  next week, we will be meeting in the President’s Conference Room (N318– FANCY!)

Here are next week’s readings: First is a VERY short reading from Bad Ideas About Writing (and a reading you might be able to use with your students if you like,) called “Teaching Grammar Improves Writing” by Patricia A. Dunn. The second is: “Making a Case for Rhetorical Grammar” by Laura R. Micciche.

One thing I’d like us to think about for discussion is: Micciche’s students already have a pretty strong grasp of Standard Written Edited English (SWEE) when they perform these rhetorical analyses on texts. How might you use this idea of “rhetorical grammar” to teach writing here at City Tech? 

Please also (as a comment on this post) write up EITHER:

  • an exercise/ assignment that you do to teach reading/annotation/vocabulary strategies OR
  • a concern or problem you have with teaching reading.

Also, the forums on grammar/ engagement/ modes are still up. We’ll be talking about grammars next week– if you have issues or concerns you’d like to cover, post something in that forum.

Featured post

For Sept 24! UPDATE: WE ARE IN NAMM 618 AGAIN.

Hey guys, thanks for a good session! I’ll try to get us a less sauna-like room for our next meeting.

For next time, please do the following:

  1. Read “Creating Mindful Readers in First-Year Composition Courses: A Strategy to Facilitate Transfer” by Carillo and “Introducing Difficulty” from The Elements (and Pleasures) of Difficulty by Salvatori and Donahue. (links are live). They’re both pretty short, and both could be used with your students if you so desired.
  2. Comment on at least 2 of the 3 discussion forums (they are just below this post.) These are the topics that we were talking about in class. All you have to do is add a comment to the post. Super easy!
  3. Upload the low-stakes assignments we discussed in class to “low-stakes assignments.”

That’s plenty, so I’m not going to ask you to write more, but if you DO happen to have any good handouts of reading assignments or strategies you have, please send them my way! I’m going to compile a packet of reading assignments and I would love to have more to add.

Also, in case you are interested, here is the handout I have about teaching students how to email a professor. Jackie has one that’s less corny, I think, but corny is kinda how I roll (you’re welcome to use this if it’s helpful to you.)

Download (PDF, 292KB)

Featured post

How to create a new post

FYI– We meet in Namm 618 at 4 pm. Also, our upcoming dates are:
Sept 11
Sept 25
Oct 2
Oct 23
Nov 6
Nov 20
Dec 4
Dec 11
Make sure you’re a member of the PD site.
    1. Make sure you’re Registered with Open Lab.
    2. Find the PD site.
    3. Click on Join! (just below the avatar).
    4. Click on Visit Project Site on the right hand side.
    5. You’re in!
NOW to create a post.
  1. Find the little circle with the plus sign in it on the top of the site.
  2. Click on it. You will open the Post Dashboard by default.
  3. Give it a title.
  4. Type your message.
  5. To attach a document, click on Add Media.
    • The Media Library page will open.
    • Click on Upload Files.
    • Go find and choose your file.Click on Insert into Post.
    • You’ll be taken back to the Post Dashboard
  6.  When you finish your post, pick a Category from the Category menu on the right side. If you forget, you’ll get a prompt to pick a Category.
  7. Then hit Publish.
Featured post

Welcome to the semester!

UPDATE: We’re slowly adding some theoretical texts to the website that may be more accessible to students, but I also wanted to draw your attention to the free ebook BAD IDEAS ABOUT WRITING which has a number of short readings about misconceptions about writing that you may find useful to use in your 1101 course. I’ve pointed out a few that I find pretty helpful for talking about genre and discourse in the readings section of our blog. There are also a few that I think will be very helpful for discussing research, once we get there. I do intend to add a section to the website for readings on research. 

Hey everyone! I just wanted to say hi and update the site for the semester. You’ll notice that it’s no longer called “Summer Institute,” but instead “2019 Professional Development” as, sadly, it’s no longer summer.

To recap: we will be meeting on Sept 11 (location TBD) from 4-5:15. In preparation for this meeting, please just write up briefly a low stakes (either in-class or homework) assignment) that has worked well for you this semester, especially if you feel it increased student engagement. Please post this on “low stakes assignments” on this site. We’ll spend most of this session just checking in with you about how the semester is going thus far, what you are struggling with and how you’re feeling about your units, both current and forthcoming.

Also, if you haven’t done so yet, please post your units and syllabi on the site. If you’re struggling, please email or come see me. Also, I’m adding some more short, accessible theoretical readings to the site.

Hope you’re doing well, and please feel free to stop by!

(my students made that.)

 

Research Question and Reflection Assignment

Here is an assignment I found on the Arizona State University website.  I have modified it for my classes as we have been stumbling over the creation of our research/curiosity questions (in part because we have had so many holidays and missed classes….no complaints about that though)  Hopefully, this will help.  I plan on using this assignment this week.  

Download (DOCX, 10KB)

Vocabulary assignment

I give students a list of relevant vocabulary words important to our work.  We are doing a unit on the environment and New York City now.  I ask the students to get into pairs or triads and write dialogues or trialogues if the word exists and then present them to the class.  Below is the list of words they have already encountered in their readings and should have looked up.  A  few I have already gone over with them, such as sustainablity since it has a specific environmental meaning.  This is the list of words.

  1.  sustainability
  2. resilience
  3. estuary
  4. current
  5. mitigate
  6. berm
  7. dune
  8. levee
  9. equity
  10. evacuation
  11. reservoir

 

Active Listening as Metaphor for Active Reading

Tricia asked me to post about this.

 

Using Diane Senechal’s definition of active listening, I suggest using this as a metaphor for reading. Active listening involves nonverbal gestures. What about reading? Underlines and highlights are nonverbal signs. Thinking of questions to ask the speaker to prompt further explanation can be questions for discussion in class. The pause an active listener gives after a speaker finishes can be reflection after the reading has ended.

Post about incorporating the old and new modes

Just because we are using genre and rhetoric does not mean we do away with comparison and argument.  We can do away with the redundant comparison and contrast since comparison implies contrast.  Why not do a paper comparing several genres about similar topics?  I personally am thinking about this.  As for argument, there is no way we are dispensing with argument.  Many articles, books, essays advocate positions.  As such, we as teachers need to bring up argument.  As a citizen our students need to know argument and comparison to watch a presidential debate.  Part of our job is helping students become literate, informed citizens.  They will need argument and comparison in addition to rhetoric and genre. Understanding rhetoric itself implies understanding of argument.

Debating Language Diversity

This handout sparked lively debate in the class.  I asked my classes to respond to which argument they found more persuasive and why.  We also examined what rhetorical strategies each writer employed, including what type of evidence each relied upon.   Students were really impressed with how Vershawn Ashanti Young’s response to Fish made sentence style itself into a kind of persuasive argument–a strong argument on behalf of language diversity and against the prejudices underwriting SAE.