Jacquelyn Blain

Conventions

To me, “genre” was just a bunch of stories that had similar premises, themes, and conclusions that were eventually categorized in the same type of story. For example, stories that end with someone tragically dying or having tragedy brought to the protagonist can be categorized as a tragedy, or stories that are aimed towards a young demographic like pre-teens and teenagers can be categorized as YA novels. After reading the three articles I believe the “ingredients” of an education narrative genre are educating the reader on a topic that they think they can relate to and adding a different perspective to the conversation, the author is trying to get you to think more on a topic that you previously had a found opinion on and make you either debate or agree with them and share your experience with them. The author is trying their best to educate both you band yourself. A good place for where you should write an educating narrative is when you are in middle and high school, for middle school is when you are anxious about the final step until you go on to the world and in those years you still have rose-tinted glasses and you still have that naivete about you while in high school, that is where people have a much greater understanding for who they are and those are the days were they absorb information the fastest. One question that I have is how should I start a paragraph about an educational narrative

1 Comment

  1. Jacquelyn Blain

    You’re getting it — an EN is all about something that happened to you that had an impact on you in terms of “education,” no matter how you want to define education. In school, out of school, a single event, a series of events. Doesn’t matter. It’s all about you. And how you start is just to think of something that stood out for you in terms of your learning something, good or bad. Then tell us that story. Narrative = story. And this is a story about you and education. So just start writing!

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