Project 3 Submissions

Project 3 Narrative Illustration

Project Description:

In this multilayered assignment you will reinterpret a classic folk tale or fairy tale through your own creative lens. You will, through the course of the assignment develop characters, setting, and finalize 2 illustrations featuring the same character in two very different settings and situations.

  • You may choose a vertical or horizontal format.
  • Final art will be 11 x 14 – inch, full-color illustration
  • You should interpret the story through your own personal artistic lens informed by thorough research and reference.
  • Final art will be delivered digitally.
  • All drawing will be done traditionally, and will be rendered in a medium and process to be agreed upon with instructor.

 

Project 3 SUBMISSION DIRECTIONS:

  1. Upload your 2-3 Final聽Drawings and your Process Book to DROPBOX. 聽These should be 2 separate submissions. 聽

The file size is 11 x 14聽inches

Save as JPEGS / RGB (not CMYK or grayscale)

Resolution: 120

Naming conventions:

lastname_imagetitle_01.jpg,聽lastname_imagetitle_02.jpg etc.

lastname_process.jpg

Upload BOTH parts of Project 3 to Dropbox.

Project 3 GRADING BREAKDOWN:聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽

50 % project grade CREATE A PDF PROCESS BOOK guiding us through the project from inception to conclusion. BEGIN the book with your PITCH.

Carefully SCAN your process work. This should include : Your Brainstorm, Thumbnails, Concept Sketches, Value Roughs, Related Sketchbook Work, and Final Designs.聽Provide a blurb about the project. Include summary of the article you analyzed, and your approach to the project.

Carefully Label all of your work. Be sure all of it is presented well: facing the right way, no shadows in the picture, good contrast, etc.

50 % project gradeCONCEPT ART ( Including Final Drawings聽and Character Designs for your Story)

 

 

Intro to Perspective

Hello Class! 聽

NEXT week we will聽explore the Narrative Element of POINT OF VIEW as a story telling device. In order to give you a little extra help聽drawing your scenes from different points of view, you need to learn a little聽PERSPECTIVE!

 

 

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One Point Perspective聽or聽Parallel Perspective聽point perspective works well for situations like the one below, where the viewer is oriented directly in front of a set of parallel lines like railroad tracks or a long hallway.

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But what if you want to show the viewer something from an聽angle?

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Two point perspective聽uses two vanishing points set well apart on the horizon line. The rule of thumbs here is sets of parallel lines must be either vertical or recede toward one of the two vanishing points.

READ CHAPTERS 4 and 5 of聽Creative Layout for Artists to learn more! 聽

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AND … Here are a couple of additional tutorials to get you started!

Happy Drawing!

Stories: A Love Letter

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Greg Ruth,聽A Pirate’s Guide To Recess

Is there any aspiration more human, and more powerful, than the art of storytelling? As illustrators, we are admittedly very biased! After all, what is illustration if not the art of visual storytelling?

Some people are naturally adept at storytelling. They will captivate a room and have their audience hanging on every word. They know just the right moments to pause, to hush their voice, to yell, to inject tension or humor. But another person can tell the exact-same story and clear the room out!

Visual storytelling is no different. A thousand illustrators can approach the same work, each with their own unique storytelling voice (again the idea of聽personal vision), and each one will come out with a different interpretation, a different read on the story. Some of these reads will invariably be more successful than others. The ideas we will be approaching in this module will help us to be sure our interpretations work. We examine the intimate relationship between story and visual art, and look at how our all our artistic decisions affect our ability to tell a great story in our own unique voice.

You’ve heard the old saying “a picture is worth a thousand words?” In great narrative illustration it’s absolutely true!

鈥撯揑llustrator Greg Ruth, from Stories: A Love Letter

source: Muddy Colors

Molly Bang, Picture This

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Picture This is Molly Bang’s insightful book about how the visual composition of images works to engage emotions, and how the elements of an artwork can give it the power to tell a story. 聽Why are diagonals dramatic? Why are curves calming? Why does red feel hot and blue feel cold? First published in 1991,聽Picture This聽has changed the way artists, illustrators, reviewers, critics, and readers look at and understand art

Blog Post:

Each week, choose a compositional strategy you from the reading that you find compelling. 聽Explain how it works and how you could relate it to your art.

Assignment Two

Hello Class!

  • You are designing a poster as part of AIGA鈥榮 Get Out the Vote Use the power of design & illustration to motivate the American public to register and turn out to vote in the 2016 general election, as well as local elections to come.
  • The strongest posters will be featured in the student gallery as part of an exhibition of original, nonpartisan posters created for printing and public distribution.
  • Poster Designs can be general calls to Get out the Vote, or can reflect One Specific Issue or Speak to a Specific Demographic and its importance in this election year.
  • Posters will be 11 x 17 vertical and will be completed using a limited palate. Black, White and 2 other colors only.

Look at AIGA鈥檚 Get out the Vote Poster Design Campaign. Look at some of the entries.聽 Choose one entry that you feel is effective and innovative.聽 Explain why in a short blog post in our Open Lab discussion page

http://www.aiga.org/get-out-the-vote

Inking Tips and Tricks

Ink can be a messy medium!

Before you begin your work in this medium, here are some helpful tips and tricks.

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  • Always warm up.

Just as you would warm up before exercise, warm up before using ink. Take the time to work on your lines and strokes on a separate sheet of paper before you begin working on your actual illustration. This will ensure that you have proper command of your hands.

This image is of comic book artist Jacob Halton’s inking warm-up, which he does in the morning to “get command of his hands”.

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  • Don’t tape down your page.

Marks are easier to make when moving your hand in certain directions, so move your page around in order to make this possible. Work your hands in the way that they move naturally.

  • Begin with thicker lines.

This is a way to keep warming up your hands. Thicker lines are safer to work with until you feel confident enough to move onto the drawing’s fine detail portions.

  • Work in a way that minimizes smearing.

Don’t try to work on the illustration in a left-to-right method, or in any order like that. Instead, think about where your hand may smear the ink, and work in a way that minimizes that smearing. Some artists place a piece of paper or paper towel under their inking hands in order to help with this process.

  • Address large areas of ink last.

All paper, including watercolor paper or Bristol board, will warp when wet. It’s much easier to draw controlled lines on completely flat paper. Therefore, draw your lines before soaking any large areas with ink, otherwise known as executing an ink wash. Another method is to fill in large areas of ink, and then either allow for drying time or use a hair dryer before moving on to finer details.

 

Pen and Ink Tools – Part 2

Pen-and-ink Drawing Surfaces

Pen-and-ink drawings are usually created on different types of paper. The聽tooth聽or grain of the paper can affect the marks made by the pen. Because of this, most illustrators prefer to work on smoother surfaces that are still absorbent to the ink, creating detailed ink drawings in this way.

You can use ink to draw on your sketchbook paper, but over time this paper will warp or fray with the wetness of the ink. The paper in this sketchbook simply isn’t heavy or absorbent enough. For final work, illustrators usually choose something with a little more heft.

Paper

Bristol Board聽is a smooth-surfaced paper that’s heavier than regular drawing paper. It’s a popular choice for pen-and-ink drawings.

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Another popular choice for ink drawings, and the paper used for this class, is聽hot-press watercolor paper. Hot press refers to the method used to make this special kind of paper. This paper’s surface has been ironed smooth, and is very versatile, allowing artists to make fine details in ink as well as combine other media such as watercolors or colored pencils.

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Pen and Ink Tools – Part 1

In this class, for the most part we will be using a crow quill (or dipping pen) and/or聽a brush to make our marks.

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However, an almost endless number of pen and ink tools and techniques exist, and it’s highly recommended that you experiment with as many opportunities as possible within this amazing medium.聽Some substantial differences exist between tools; it’s likely you will prefer some over others. Take the time to experiment and discover your own interests and comforts

 

In this and subsequent posts, we’ll cover the most commonly used pen-and-ink drawing tools and materials.聽In addition to the obvious ink-specific tools such as pens, brushes, and paper, you may also need to acquire paper towels, white-out pens (useful for reproduction work), an old toothbrush, and a water jar.

 

Quills

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The first pens were made from feathers (quills), bamboo, or reeds. Usually, quills are created from the wing feathers of geese. Other common feathers used for quills come from the crow, eagle, owl, hawk, swan, and turkey. These feathers are carefully treated in order to retain their shape despite frequent wetting and drying. The hollow shaft of the feather acts as an ink reservoir, and ink flows to the tip by capillary action.

Crow Quill

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The modern version of the traditional quill鈥攖he steel dipping pen, or crow quill鈥攔emains widely used by illustrators today.聽This pen is included in your supply list and is the one recommended for use in this course. A quill pen can produce either very delicate lines or thicker, more dramatic ones. It can also produce lines of varying width. Check out all the varied lines produced by a crow quill in the next image. When you press down on the crow quill, more ink is released, making the line thicker. Apply less pressure, and the line becomes thinner. This allows your line to vary from thick to thin and visa versa without having to change the position of the pen.

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Aside from the traditional look it gives an image, a聽crow quill聽helps to develop hand techniques that are needed for all drawing media. When working with a quill, you must learn to control the pressure that you apply to the nib in order to vary the weight of your lines.

Crow quills are made of both a聽holder聽and a聽nib.聽The nib is the metal point that you dip into the ink. They come in a variety of sizes and with a variety of point shapes (pointed, angled, or rounded), but all are flexible, have a small hole or reservoir, and are split at the tip, thereby allowing the ink to flow onto the work surface. They also work on the same principle as the feather, sucking up the ink through capillary action. You’re encouraged to experiment with several different types and sizes of nibs in order to see how they all perform differently.

Caring For Your Crow Quill

When using your crow quill,聽don’t聽dip it into the ink past the nib. Doing so will cause messy, uncontrollable drips on your artwork and will also damage the pen, shortening its life. Dipping in just past the reservoir is ideal.

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Drawing Pens

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These drawing pens are similar to a felt tip pen, but they use archival ink. Several different brands exist but the most commonly used are the Microns pictured here. Various point sizes make it easy to control line weights. These pens are often used for sketching, particularly for comic book art and illustration. Again, note the consistent line weight and various sizes, each of which is ideal for different purposes. You’re highly encouraged to try using these pens if you haven’t already done so.

 

Brushes As Drawing Tools

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Watercolor brushes and brushes for working in ink are generally the same: they both use water as the dilution and clean-up medium. However, keep in mind that once a brush has been used for inking, it’s difficult to get perfectly clean again, so be careful that leftover ink doesn’t stain your artwork when subsequently using other media. Keep in mind we are specifically discussing drawing here; painterly brush techniques will be covered in later modules.

Brushes used for drawing purposes are generally of a smaller gauge. Though the sizes of brushes you’ll use will vary given the size of your picture (the larger the picture, the larger the brush, in general), good sizes for general inking鈥攕uch as comic book style illustration鈥攁re the number 0 to number 3. These allow for both thicker and thinner lines, but will also give a “drawn,” as opposed to “painterly,” feel.

Also similar to the style produced via crow quill, a brush allows for line width variation based on pressure.聽For this course, drawing with a brush in addition to the crow quill is recommended. Take the time to practice with both.

Caring For Your Brushes

Don’t dip your brush into the ink all the way to the metal. This will make for a messy drawing tool and will shorten the life of your brush. Clean your brush every time you’re finished using it. If you plan to use it again in a short time, rinse it in water that’s completely clean. Don’t leave your brushes sitting in water for long periods of time, as this will damage your brushes’ tips. In general, it’s better to periodically wash brushes with soap and water, which will not only keep your brushes in good shape but will also ensure their ability to manipulate ink effectively. Don’t聽use turpentine or other hard solvents to clean, as they’re unnecessary with ink and will deteriorate the hairs on your brush.

Expressive Line : Master’s Study Egon Sheile & David Mack

Lines are where most people begin when first starting to draw. By themselves, lines are powerful drawing tools! They have shape, texture, and weight, all of which can add up to a very expressive drawing if you’re thoughtful about their creation.

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When beginning a drawing, people often carefully inspect an object’s outside edge, or silhouette, as a starting point. They render each line representing an edge or contour. Next, people usually fill in those contours with value.

However, so much can happen using just line alone! A line by itself is capable of conveying all sorts of emotions. In your drawings, lines can and should have life.

 

Try this

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In your sketchbook, take five minutes to draw as many different kinds of lines as you can imagine. Try different movements with your hand, drawing lines from your wrist, your elbow, and then your whole arm. Try different amounts of hand pressure, creating straight lines, parallel lines, curves, and spirals. There’s no wrong or right answer here! This freeing exercise will help open up your expressive drawing skills, warming you up to this medium.

Egon Schiele

German expressionist Egon Schiele is a master of the living line. In these images note how he uses nothing but varying kinds of line in order to imbue these portraits with interest and emotion.

Line Weight

Part of what we see creating the sense of liveliness and emotion in Schiele’s lines is an incredible understanding of line weight.

Line weight is an important drawing concept. Different tools create different kinds of lines, and allow us different methods of varying line weight. A line’s聽weight,聽meaning how dark or thick it is, will make that line either move forward in an image (if it’s a strong, dark line) or sink farther back (if it’s light or thin). This is useful when trying to give the impression of something being closer or further away. A heavier line weight will also create emphasis on a particular area of a drawing, which is of course useful in creating our focal points.

In the two images shown here, note how the image on the left is logical. The closest block is also the one with the thickest contour line, which makes visual sense. However, in the image on the right, the line weights of the blocks don’t follow the correct hierarchy, as they don’t recede in space logically.

David Mack

David Mack, contemporary comic book illustrator and creator, is known for his linear figure drawing style. In the next series of drawings, notice how Mack uses only contour lines in order to describe the body. It’s useful to note that he cites Schiele as an influence to his work. His expert use of line weight is especially obvious in the implied shadows that convey a feeling of gravity entirely though varying thickness of line.