Project 2 REDO

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Hey Class-

 

You all asked so here we go…

 

If you want another crack at聽Project 2 Editorial Illustration, you may resubmit to DROPBOX until 12/20/2016. 聽DO NOT resubmit if your final is not complete and REALLY WELL DONE… its more important that you do a great job on the final.

Also PLEASE DO NOT resubmit if it is not BETTER than the first attempt. 聽You will get a lower grade than you started with. 馃檪

Final Project Instructions

Process Work DUE 12/ 13 VIA EMAIL:

  • Character Model Sheets 鈥 Black and white
  • Color Roughs
  • Value Roughs (already due on 12/ 6!)

FINAL PROJECT Due: 12/20

Project Description:

In this multilayered assignment you will reinterpret a classic folk tale or fairy tale through your own creative lens.聽 You will, through the course of the assignment develop characters, setting, and finalize 2 illustrations featuring the same character in two very different settings and situations.

 

  • You may choose a vertical or horizontal format.
  • Final art will be 11 x 14 – inch, full-color illustration
  • You should interpret the story through your own personal artistic lens informed by thorough research and reference.
  • Final art will be delivered digitally.
  • All drawing will be done traditionally, and will be rendered in a medium and process to be agreed upon with instructor.

 

FINAL PROJECT GRADING BREAKDOWN:聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽

50 % project grade聽:PROCESS BOOK

  • PDF PROCESS BOOK guiding us through the project from inception to conclusion.

Carefully SCAN and Format your process work.聽 This should include: Story Pitch, Thumbnails, Concept Sketches, Value Roughs, Color Roughs, Related Sketchbook Work, and Final ART.聽 Label each image.聽 Provide text where necessary to explain your thought process, where changes were made, and how research effected your approach to the project.

Label all of your work! 聽Be sure all of it is presented well! I.E. facing the right way, no shadows in the picture, good contrast, etc.

 

50 % project grade 聽– FINALIZED ART

 

  • 2 COLOR RGB JPEG illustrations
  • 1 set of character designs , including expressions and model sheet PDF

OPTIONAL EXTRA CREDIT: COLOR BOOK COVER (only do this if EVERYTHING else is done)

File naming protocol:

Arocho_FinalProject_1.jpg, Arocho_FinalProject_2.jpg, Arocho_CharacterDesigns.pdf, Arocho_ProcessBook.PDF,聽Arocho_BookCover.jpg

Upload BOTH parts to Dropbox.

https://www.dropbox.com/request/OBSvV6rJvr92PV1NjZca

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

PLEASE BRING HIGH QUALITY PRINTS OF ILLUSTRATIONS AND CHARACTER DESIGNS ON 12/20 FOR CRITIQUE!

 

* Remember to convert your files from RGB to CMYK before printing!

Focal Point Through Color: Direct Your Viewer with Contrast

 

We already know that great composition will guide our viewer, allowing us the illustrator to direct the overall聽read of the image. We鈥檝e also looked at how strong value contrast establishes clear focal points. Contrast and intensity in color works exactly the same way.

Strong differences in color and highly saturated color will pull your viewers eye, every time. Remember you are making deliberate choices to tell the best story you can. 聽Using color to both tell the story by establishing mood and setting, and creating places of emphasis to guide your viewer is critical.

Color used for emphasis can be very dramatic.

 

But聽contrast can be used to guide the viewer聽subtly too.

Consider this image called Camouflage by James Gurney, creator of Dinotopia. Take a good look and be aware of where your eyes travel.

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Gurney conducted an experiment concerning focal points and how different people look at the same image. By adding together the eye movement data from a group of test subjects, he was able to observe where people look in a given picture.

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To create the image below, eye-tracking technology recorded the data of sixteen different subjects and compiled the information into a composite image, called a heatmap. The red and orange colors show where 80-100% of the subjects halted their gaze. The bluer or darker areas show where hardly anyone looked.

The heatmap for聽Camouflage聽shows that everyone noticed the dinosaur鈥檚 face. They also quickly spotted the hidden man and the small pink dinosaur.聽 According to data connected to timing, these three faces drew almost everyone鈥檚 attention within the first five seconds. The dinosaur’s face was statistically the first thing most people looked at, followed quickly by the hiding man.

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Why do we look the same way at this image? As humans we are drawn to faces. This is a given. However, though the contrast is subtle, the only pink things in all that foliage, (remember green鈥檚 complement is red) are the hidden man鈥檚 skin and the small pink dinosaur.

 

Monochromatic Color Scheme

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It isn’t always necessary to use many colors in order to achieve a colorful image — the monochromatic color scheme consists of one color plus black and can be very powerful. 聽Amonochromatic color scheme has one principle color and in all it鈥檚 various tints, shades, and tones.

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1980s fantasy illustrator Frank Frazetta whose work we鈥檝e looked at in previously, makes great uses of a monochromatic color scheme in this illustration,聽Silver Warrior.

Note the tiny dabs of warm color he uses to create high contrast focal points within this otherwise completely monochromatic composition. Those warm spots stand out due to color temperature.

 

Tony DiTerlizzi鈥檚 Monochromatic Palate

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Illustrator Tony DiTerlizzi often works in a monochromatic palate. For his book The Spider and the Fly he chose a metallic silver and. The beautifully rendered drawings are printed in black against a silver printed page. Silver is a gray and not, therefore, really a color. But because it’s metallic, it contributes more than a standard gray. Though DiTerlizzi’s color solution may seem basic, it is unique in children’s picture books and greatly enhances the mood of his illustrations.

 

For his more recent series of chapter books, The Search for Wondla, DiTerlizzi chooses a different approach. Here, there are no contrasting dabs of warm color like there were in the Frazetta piece.

DiTerlizzi again works monochromatically, but in this case he chooses a two color printing process, meaning he chooses a principle color and the illustrations are all formed by the various combinations of this ink and black 2 along with the white of the paper.

Color Theory Review: Concepts and Terminology

The Three Attributes of a Color

To accurately describe a color and differentiate it from another there are 3 attributes to measure.

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HUE

When the average person says “color” they are actually mean hue. The hue of a color is its particular light wave energy frequency. Remember, light is waves of energy, and white light is contains all possible colors! Violet is the highest visible light frequency and red is the lowest, which we humans have receptors to see.

In this diagram, note how the blue becomes pink, but all of the colors in between are of equal intensity, as it as it moves from right to left.

SATURATION

Saturation (or chroma as it is sometimes called) means a color’s purity. When people are talking about a color’s intensity they mean its saturation or chroma.

In the diagram, note how the blue becomes less saturated as it as it moves from right to left.

VALUE

As we discussed earlier in the course, colors have values just as shades of gray do. A color’s brightness or darkness, and its nearness to white or black respectively, is the color’s value. Value is independent of hue or saturation and can be seen even in a black-and-white photo.

 

Tints, Shades, and Tones

Value聽has is has its own color terminology.

Remember that the value of a color is how light or dark a color is, or how close it is to black.

Tints聽are when we add white to a pure hue:

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Shades聽are when we add black to a pure hue:

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Saturation聽also has its own color terminology.

We get different tones when we add gray to a pure hue:

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Another way to envision this is as the hue itself becomes less saturated, it appears more and more gray.

 

Munsell’s Color Tree

Talking about color can be very misleading! For example, when you go to a paint store, you can buy a can of Honorable Blue, Flyway, or Wondrous Blue! When we say Flesh Tone, what exactly does that mean? Whose Flesh Tone are we talking about? 聽It can be very confusing!

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Albert Munsell, an artist and professor the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, felt the same way. In 1905 he developed a “rational way to describe color” using numeric notation instead of names to describe color. To assign these numbers he used the three attributes we discussed above: hue,聽value, and chroma (saturation).

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In the diagram above, you can see the traditional color wheel as the center ring, and Munsell’s Color Tree, as it came to be known, growing from the center. The trunk of the tree represents zero to ten in value. The farther we move from its “trunk” represents an increase in chroma, until the hue鈥攔epresented by the separate “branches”鈥攊s at full saturation, farthest away from the center.

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Munsell’s Color Tree

 

THE COLOR WHEEL

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YES, you painted one of these in Kindergarden. I know. However the usefulness and knowledge that can come from this tool is limitless. So please let go your preconceptions toward color, and using a color wheel and come into this with an open mind.

The color wheel is one of the most powerful tools artists and designers have to help us understand and use color effectively. 聽It is strongly recommended that as you examine the different color schemes thought this post and the following, you look at a color wheel and plot them out.

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FUN FACT! The first circular color wheel was created by Sir Isaac Newton in 1666. As if the laws of planetary motion and gravity weren鈥檛 enough!

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Foto: picture-alliance

 

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We begin with a three-part color wheel that shows only pure colors, meaning colors which no amount of mixing will result in. These three colors are of course our primary colors: red, yellow, and blue. All other colors are derived from these three hues.

 

 

 

 

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Next we move on to our secondary colors.These are the colors formed by mixing the primary colors with each other: green, orange, and purple.

 

 

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You can further break down the color wheel into tertiary colors.These are the colors formed by mixing a primary and secondary color:聽yellow-orange, red-orange, red-purple, blue-purple, blue-green, and yellow-green.

 

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And of course we divide that wheel based on Color Temperature, with warm color opposite cold.

 

To create a successful illustration, your color palette or scheme needs to support your big idea. It must work to further your narrative and or concept. 聽If you have already taken Color and Design, you will have worked with various color schemes.聽聽 In the next few posts, and in the remaining weeks of class, you’ll look review color theory in detail, and see how those color schemes can influence narrative. We will also look at how they are applied in both fine art and in contemporary illustration
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Drawing by Philippe Buchet, Color by Matt Hollingsworth