Jill Belli’s Profile

Faculty
active 2 days, 17 hours ago
Jill Belli
Title
Assistant Professor; Co-Director of the OpenLab
Department
English
Office
Namm 520 (mailbox: Namm 512)
Academic interests

utopian studies, science fiction, positive psychology, happiness studies, composition and rhetoric, writing studies, pedagogy (the scholarship of teaching and learning), education, digital humanities, American studies, cultural studies

Bio

Jill Belli, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of English at New York City College of Technology, CUNY (City University of New York) and Co-Director of OpenLab, the college’s open-source digital platform for teaching, learning, and collaborating. She teaches courses in the department’s B.S. in Professional and Technical Writing, and on utopian studies, science fiction, literature, and composition. Her research centers on utopian studies, positive psychology/happiness studies, composition and rhetoric/writing studies, digital humanities, and education/pedagogy. Her current book project, Pedagogies of Happiness, explores these intersections. She is a founding member of the Writing Studies Tree (writingstudiestree.org), an online, open-access, interactive academic genealogy for the field of writing studies, and she serves on the Steering Committee, the Teaching Committee, and as the web developer for the North American Society for Utopian Studies (utopian-studies.org). When not researching, writing, or teaching, Jill practices yoga and plays violin with the Brooklyn Symphony Orchestra.

Work Phone
(718) 260-4974
Email address
Twitter
CUNY Academic Commons

My Courses

ENG 2720: Writing with New Media

ENG 2720: Writing with New Media

An exploration of the changing nature of composition practices and rhetorical strategies in the digital age. Students are introduced to a variety of digital writing platforms that expand communicative practices beyond print-based media. Taking advantage of the visual and interactive properties of computer-mediated communication, students consider the ways in which composition practices and rhetorical strategies are transformed in digital environments.

English 2001: Introduction to Literature I Fiction

English 2001: Introduction to Literature I Fiction

Together, we will learn the elements of fiction and practice close reading through various short stories and two post-apocalyptic novels that explore notions of identity, storytelling, and imagining other possibilities/worlds. In particular, we will consider how the texts’ settings constrain their narrators, and how these narrators make sense—through language—of their lives when they don’t always have control over what happens to them. We will pay close attention to how these narrators constantly revisit, revise, and re-imagine their stories, blurring the lines between fiction and fact, and re-shaping the plots, themselves, and their worlds in the process. “Analysis and critical understanding of selected fiction. Exams and essays based on readings.”

ENG 2420: Science Fiction

ENG 2420: Science Fiction

English 2420 combines analysis of science fiction as literature with consideration of the questions science and technology raise about past, present, and future societies. In class discussions and essays, students will focus on the basic elements of literary analysis, the historical development of the science fiction genre, and the thematic concerns of each assigned text. Class discussions will address issues of form and will delve into the cultural contexts that have helped shaped some of the core tropes of the genre, such as artificial intelligence and human/machine interactions, the exploration of space and time, and the possibility of extraterrestrial life. Attention will also be paid to the ways in which authors have used utopian and dystopian societies of the future to comment upon humanity’s present relationship with science and technology. Avatar Image Credit: Georges Méliès [Public domain], Screenshot from Le Voyage dans la lune (A Trip to the Moon) (1902), via Wikimedia Commons

Utopias & Dystopias (ENG 2000: Perspectives in Literature)

Utopias & Dystopias (ENG 2000: Perspectives in Literature)

This course is an introduction to literature through the lens of “utopia,” or the desire for a different, better way of being. Through exploring short stories, novels, poetry, songs, advertisements, films, TV shows, the news, social media, and our own experiences, we will critically examine the blurry line between utopia & dystopia: when/how/why various utopian impulses (such as happiness, progress, technological advancement, efficiency, stability) that are intended to improve society can go (and have gone) terribly awry. We will look at how thinkers have historically imagined some of the more frightening and perhaps unforeseen and unintended consequences of “utopia”, and then we will apply these fictional visions to the real-life contemporary world in which we live. We will ask ourselves the difficult (but unavoidable) questions that emerge from such a study: what are the values behind our actions? How do we conceive of/build for things such as happiness, progress, knowledge? How does our increasing dependence on science and technology (often viewed as utopian tools capable of leveling the playing field, sharing diverse ideas, bridging distances, and uniting people from different backgrounds/races/cultures) have the potential to transform into frightening methods of control, censorship, conformity, and isolation? Are our virtual connections/lives/memories displacing our sense of the “real”? Have we retained (and if so, can we continue to maintain) “humanity” in this “post-human” age of commodification, cybernetics, and catastrophe? Will the environment withstand our relentless abuse of it? Will people withstand our relentless abuse of one another? In our attempt to answer these questions (and others) throughout the semester, we will develop critical perspectives that are an integral part of becoming competent thinkers, readers, writers, and citizens of the world. — ENG 2000 Description: “Readings in and writings about literature across genres, eras and locales. Themes include family, the individual and society, good and evil, gender, faith, and “”the human heart in conflict with itself.”” Essays and exams based on readings.”

Selling Happiness: The Promises and Problems of Self-Help Literature

Selling Happiness: The Promises and Problems of Self-Help Literature

Do you dream of having more happiness, success, or love? Of getting better grades, jobs, relationships, or sleep? If so, you are not alone! Countless people want more from their lives and from others, and they turn to self-help to make their dreams reality. Some doctors even prescribe self-help books for their patients! What is this obsession with self-help? What does it offer us? Why do we keep reading it? This course is an introduction to “the American love affair with self-help” through its literature, industry, benefits, and critiques. Though self-help is often dismissed as providing low-brow, quack remedies for the masses, this course considers it in earnest, exploring what makes the genre so compelling, and why and how self-help matters, to individuals and societies. Students will read self-help texts; try their techniques; reflect on their methods, effectiveness, promises, and problems; and create their own self-help texts for others. *Avatar Credit: By nobody – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

My Projects

Literary Arts Festival

Literary Arts Festival

Each year, the English Department at New York City College of Technology organizes the Literary Arts Festival. This event highlights the work of students, staff, and faculty, as well as accomplished writers outside of the City Tech community. There is also a writing competition that awards prizes to students in a variety of writing categories, as well as to faculty and staff in their own category.

FYLC – First Year Learning Communities

FYLC – First Year Learning Communities

Welcome to the First Year Learning Communities Open Lab project page. If you are interested in joining the Reflective Writing Project or just learning more about events, resources and information related to the FYLCs at City Tech please request membership!

First Year Experience Committee

First Year Experience Committee

As a committee we are working on enhancing our new student orientation process. We are assessing and enhancing all steps from the moment a student is accepted into the college to their first year experience. The departments involved in the pilot are: African American Studies, Architectural Technology, Computer Systems Technology, Construction Management and Civil Engineering Technology, Dental Hygiene, English, Entertainment Technology, Hospitality Management, Human Services, Nursing, and Radiologic Technology & Medical Imaging.

Opening Gateways Project Management

Opening Gateways Project Management

This is a private group for members of the management team of “Opening Gateways to Completion: Open Digital Pedagogies for Student Success in STEM,” a Title V Cooperative Arrangement grant funded through U.S. Department of Education’s Supporting Hispanic-Serving Institutions program. The project, a collaboration between City Tech and the Borough of Manhattan Community College, is focussed on using Open Digital Pedagogies to increase student success in gateway mathematics courses for STEM disciplines. Avatar image and site header by Flickr user Rosa Say (https://flic.kr/p/8vdRTC).

OER Fellowship

OER Fellowship

This is a collaborative space for faculty in the Open Educational Resources (OER) Fellowship, and anyone interested in OERs and open pedagogy.

My Clubs

Jill Belli hasn't created or joined any clubs yet.