Jill Belli’s Profile

Faculty
active 2 weeks, 1 day ago
Jill Belli
Title
Associate Professor; Co-Director of the OpenLab
Department
English
Office Location
Namm 520 (mailbox: Namm 512)
Academic interests

utopian studies, science fiction, positive psychology, happiness studies, composition and rhetoric, writing studies, pedagogy (the scholarship of teaching and learning), education, digital humanities, American studies, cultural studies

Bio

Jill Belli, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of English at New York City College of Technology, CUNY (City University of New York) and Co-Director of OpenLab, the college’s open-source digital platform for teaching, learning, and collaborating. She teaches courses in the department’s B.S. in Professional and Technical Writing, and on utopian studies, science fiction, literature, and composition. Her research centers on utopian studies, positive psychology/happiness studies, composition and rhetoric/writing studies, digital humanities, and education/pedagogy. Her current book project, Pedagogies of Happiness, explores these intersections. She is a founding member of the Writing Studies Tree (writingstudiestree.org), an online, open-access, interactive academic genealogy for the field of writing studies, and she serves on the Steering Committee, the Teaching Committee, and as the web developer for the North American Society for Utopian Studies (utopian-studies.org). When not researching, writing, or teaching, Jill practices yoga and plays violin with the Brooklyn Symphony Orchestra.

Work Phone
(718) 260-4974
Email address
Twitter
CUNY Academic Commons

My Courses

OpenLab Sandbox

OpenLab Sandbox

Sandbox course for OpenLab workshops

ENG 2720: Writing with New Media

ENG 2720: Writing with New Media

An exploration of the changing nature of composition practices and rhetorical strategies in the digital age. Students are introduced to a variety of digital writing platforms that expand communicative practices beyond print-based media. Taking advantage of the visual and interactive properties of computer-mediated communication, students consider the ways in which composition practices and rhetorical strategies are transformed in digital environments.

The Composition of Happiness

The Composition of Happiness

In English Composition I (ENG 1101), we will work our way through the complex and contradictory nature of “happiness,” exploring abstract concepts (such as virtue, value, freedom, and progress), zooming in to study individual needs and desires (and the ways in which these are both created by and marketed to by things such as popular culture, advertising, and self-help products), exploring the “science of happiness” as defined by the expanding field of positive psychology, and finally broadening our gaze to engage contemporary measurements of well-being and applications of it in areas such as social media, digital technologies, city planning, economic policies, and educational curricula. Throughout the course, we will engage “happiness” as a discourse (the rhetoric of happiness) that both circulates in and helps create our world and ourselves, and we will move from merely personal visions and/or cultural stereotypes of happiness to more critical, theoretically grounded perspectives on the subject. We will ask many questions about happiness/well-being, such as: • Why does studying/thinking critically about happiness matter? • How do we (and others) define happiness? • Are visions of happiness the same for everyone? • What values do these visions of happiness endorse (perhaps implicitly)? • How is happiness represented in various places, such as in the media, popular culture, advertising, schools, the government? • What do these representations teach us about what we should desire (and not desire), what we should value (and not value), what type of people we should be (and not be), and what type of actions we should take (and not take)? • Who gets to decide what happiness should look like? • Is happiness measurable? • How do you plan for/create happiness, both at the individual and the social level? • Is there equal access to happiness (or even the possibility of happiness)? • (Perhaps counter-intuitively) Is happiness (as defined by mainstream rhetoric/politics) even desirable? If not, how we might we imagine alternative visions of/methods for happiness/well-being? Since this is a composition course, we will never leave writing out of the picture: all class meetings will be devoted in part to writing, revising, and/or discussing ideas and drafts. The last segment of the course centers on a collaborative service learning assignment (with HUS 1101), involving fieldwork and research, that assesses well-being in the City Tech environment and presents recommendations to various stakeholders in our college community. *This course is part of a learning community with Human Services Professor Justine Pawlukewicz’s HUS 1101, D634 (80981), which meets on Wednesdays from 11:30am-2:00pm in Namm 419B. Ever wonder what happiness really is? In this English and Human Services learning community, you’ll explore–from pop culture, positive psychology, and social services perspectives–what makes individuals and communities flourish or flounder.

English 2001: Introduction to Literature I Fiction

English 2001: Introduction to Literature I Fiction

Together, we will learn the elements of fiction and practice close reading through various short stories and two post-apocalyptic novels that explore notions of identity, storytelling, and imagining other possibilities/worlds. In particular, we will consider how the texts’ settings constrain their narrators, and how these narrators make sense—through language—of their lives when they don’t always have control over what happens to them. We will pay close attention to how these narrators constantly revisit, revise, and re-imagine their stories, blurring the lines between fiction and fact, and re-shaping the plots, themselves, and their worlds in the process. “Analysis and critical understanding of selected fiction. Exams and essays based on readings.”

Introduction to Literature I: Fiction

Introduction to Literature I: Fiction

We will begin the semester by exploring short stories and learning the elements of fiction, and then we will move on to read two recent longer texts that foreground the act of storytelling itself. In particular, we will look closely at the ways in which the narrators of these texts constantly revisit, revise, and re-imagine their stories, blurring the lines between fiction and fact, and re-shaping both the plots and themselves in the process.

My Projects

First-Year Writing Professional Development

First-Year Writing Professional Development

This project is for faculty participating in professional development for the First-Year Writing program at City Tech.

Opening Gateways Project Management

Opening Gateways Project Management

This is a private group for members of the management team of “Opening Gateways to Completion: Open Digital Pedagogies for Student Success in STEM,” a Title V Cooperative Arrangement grant funded through U.S. Department of Education’s Supporting Hispanic-Serving Institutions program. The project, a collaboration between City Tech and the Borough of Manhattan Community College, is focussed on using Open Digital Pedagogies to increase student success in gateway mathematics courses for STEM disciplines. Avatar image and site header by Flickr user Rosa Say (https://flic.kr/p/8vdRTC).

Office of the Provost

Office of the Provost

City Tech’s Source for Academic Affairs Information

The Open Road

The Open Road

The Open Road is our place to highlight all that’s possible on the OpenLab. Join now to keep up on OpenLab news, events, and updates. Check our weekly In the Spotlight posts for a glimpse into the incredible work being done by City Tech students, faculty, and staff. Follow OpenLab News for announcements and site updates. And see our OpenLab Calendar for office hours, events, and workshops. You can find our workshop schedule and signup for workshops here as well. The Open Road is also a place for the OpenLab community (meaning you!). We would love your feedback, insight, and comments. Please send along anything on the OpenLab that you love! We are always available for any questions you might have. Email us anytime at openlab@citytech.cuny.edu!

FYLC – First Year Learning Communities

FYLC – First Year Learning Communities

Welcome to the First Year Learning Communities Open Lab project page. If you are interested in joining the Reflective Writing Project or just learning more about events, resources and information related to the FYLCs at City Tech please request membership!

My Clubs

Club Council OpenLab Workshop

Club Council OpenLab Workshop

This club site will be used for the tutorial portion of the Club Council OpenLab Workshop (Fall 2017) and will house materials that may be useful to club representatives in building out their own sites on the OpenLab.