Jill Belli’s Profile

Faculty
active 7 hours, 48 minutes ago
Jill Belli
Title
Associate Professor; Co-Director of the OpenLab
Department
English
Office
Namm 520 (mailbox: Namm 512)
Academic interests

utopian studies, science fiction, positive psychology, happiness studies, composition and rhetoric, writing studies, pedagogy (the scholarship of teaching and learning), education, digital humanities, American studies, cultural studies

Bio

Jill Belli, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of English at New York City College of Technology, CUNY (City University of New York) and Co-Director of OpenLab, the college’s open-source digital platform for teaching, learning, and collaborating. She teaches courses in the department’s B.S. in Professional and Technical Writing, and on utopian studies, science fiction, literature, and composition. Her research centers on utopian studies, positive psychology/happiness studies, composition and rhetoric/writing studies, digital humanities, and education/pedagogy. Her current book project, Pedagogies of Happiness, explores these intersections. She is a founding member of the Writing Studies Tree (writingstudiestree.org), an online, open-access, interactive academic genealogy for the field of writing studies, and she serves on the Steering Committee, the Teaching Committee, and as the web developer for the North American Society for Utopian Studies (utopian-studies.org). When not researching, writing, or teaching, Jill practices yoga and plays violin with the Brooklyn Symphony Orchestra.

Work Phone
(718) 260-4974
Email address
Twitter
CUNY Academic Commons

My Courses

ENG 2420: Science Fiction

ENG 2420: Science Fiction

English 2420 combines analysis of science fiction as literature with consideration of the questions science and technology raise about past, present, and future societies. In class discussions and essays, students will focus on the basic elements of literary analysis, the historical development of the science fiction genre, and the thematic concerns of each assigned text. Class discussions will address issues of form and will delve into the cultural contexts that have helped shaped some of the core tropes of the genre, such as artificial intelligence and human/machine interactions, the exploration of space and time, and the possibility of extraterrestrial life. Attention will also be paid to the ways in which authors have used utopian and dystopian societies of the future to comment upon humanity’s present relationship with science and technology. Avatar Image Credit: NASA/Rachel Pike, https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasa_langley/14170843814/in/album-72157644228081367/

English 2001: Introduction to Literature I Fiction

English 2001: Introduction to Literature I Fiction

Together, we will learn the elements of fiction and practice close reading through various short stories and two post-apocalyptic novels that explore notions of identity, storytelling, and imagining other possibilities/worlds. In particular, we will consider how the texts’ settings constrain their narrators, and how these narrators make sense—through language—of their lives when they don’t always have control over what happens to them. We will pay close attention to how these narrators constantly revisit, revise, and re-imagine their stories, blurring the lines between fiction and fact, and re-shaping the plots, themselves, and their worlds in the process. “Analysis and critical understanding of selected fiction. Exams and essays based on readings.”

ENG 2420: Science Fiction

ENG 2420: Science Fiction

English 2420 combines analysis of science fiction as literature with consideration of the questions science and technology raise about past, present, and future societies. In class discussions and essays, students will focus on the basic elements of literary analysis, the historical development of the science fiction genre, and the thematic concerns of each assigned text. Class discussions will address issues of form and will delve into the cultural contexts that have helped shaped some of the core tropes of the genre, such as artificial intelligence and human/machine interactions, the exploration of space and time, and the possibility of extraterrestrial life. Attention will also be paid to the ways in which authors have used utopian and dystopian societies of the future to comment upon humanity’s present relationship with science and technology. *Course Avatar Credit: Andrew Dutt (https://openlab.citytech.cuny.edu/members/cobaltdrew/) Andrew describes the image as follows: “The illustration featured above was done for a project where the theme was Robotics. It was done many years ago, and i guess that you could say I was influenced by The Matrix and Terminator in some of my robot designs. It shows a humanoid android cradling a human child in its arms, while an ominous sentinel-type machine looms behind with a menacing mechanical arm reaching for the baby. This dichotomy prompts the question: are the machines our friends or foe?”

ENG2420 Science Fiction, SP2018, Professor Kwong

ENG2420 Science Fiction, SP2018, Professor Kwong

Analysis and critical understanding of science fiction. Exams and essays based on readings.

ENG 2720: Writing with New Media

ENG 2720: Writing with New Media

An exploration of the changing nature of composition practices and rhetorical strategies in the digital age. Students are introduced to a variety of digital writing platforms that expand communicative practices beyond print-based media. Taking advantage of the visual and interactive properties of computer-mediated communication, students consider the ways in which composition practices and rhetorical strategies are transformed in digital environments.

My Projects

2018-2019 Opening Gateways Faculty Seminar

2018-2019 Opening Gateways Faculty Seminar

“Opening Gateways to Completion: Open Digital Pedagogies for Student Success in STEM” is a 5-year, $3.2 million grant funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Supporting Hispanic-Serving Institutions program (Title V). The goal is to support student success in mathematics courses that serve as gateways to STEM disciplines, courses that often act as barriers to progress and completion in these disciplines. The project, awarded jointly to the New York City College of Technology (lead) and the Borough of Manhattan Community College (partner) in 2015, brings the two institutions together in a cross-campus collaboration that will introduce open-source digital technologies, open educational resources, and active learning pedagogies into the sequence of high-enrollment mathematics courses required for STEM disciplines at each college.

Literature Curriculum Committee of the Department of English

Literature Curriculum Committee of the Department of English

This site aims to share information about assignments, course design, and the activities of the Literature Curriculum Committee.

Open Pedagogy on the OpenLab

Open Pedagogy on the OpenLab

The purpose of this project is to create a forum to ask questions, generate discussion, and share teaching materials, resources, and ideas about teaching and learning on the OpenLab. Avatar image: “The open door” by hehaden.

Introduction to the OpenLab

Introduction to the OpenLab

An introductory module meant to guide faculty through the various uses of the OpenLab.

Opening Gateways Project Management

Opening Gateways Project Management

This is a private group for members of the management team of “Opening Gateways to Completion: Open Digital Pedagogies for Student Success in STEM,” a Title V Cooperative Arrangement grant funded through U.S. Department of Education’s Supporting Hispanic-Serving Institutions program. The project, a collaboration between City Tech and the Borough of Manhattan Community College, is focussed on using Open Digital Pedagogies to increase student success in gateway mathematics courses for STEM disciplines. Avatar image and site header by Flickr user Rosa Say (https://flic.kr/p/8vdRTC).

My Clubs

Club Council OpenLab Workshop

Club Council OpenLab Workshop

This club site will be used for the tutorial portion of the Club Council OpenLab Workshop (Fall 2017) and will house materials that may be useful to club representatives in building out their own sites on the OpenLab.