Readings

Weekly Readings
(in Class meeting dates)

Every week, read Food and Travel sections of the New York Times.
A free subscription is available to all City Tech students:  Log into CUNY First and follow link University News. (So you have no excuse!)

Read for class 2:

  1. World Tourism Organization. (2017) Second Global Report on Gastronomy Tourism, read pages 14 – 20 (download the PDF for future readings)
  2. Feloni, R. (2014) How the Michelin guide made a tire company the world’s fine dining authority, Business Insider.
  3. Skift Team and The Ontario Culinary Tourism Alliance. (2015) The Rise of Food Tourism,  read 6-9 and 11-12.
    You will need to “register” to be able to download the PDF, but you don’t need to use your actual email address if you don’t want to get Skift updates. Download the PDF for future readings.
  4. New York Times “Food” and “Travel” sections

Read for class 3:

  1. Vora, S. (2016) Where Foodies should go in 2016. New York Times.
    Click on at least 2 of the links and see what these events offer.  Make some notes: When do they take place?  Are they urban or rural?  What do they offer to the local community.  I will ask you to write a brief synopsis in class.
  2. Long, L. (2004). Culinary tourism. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky. Pg. 108-13. Available on Blackboard > Content > Long excerpts.
    Take some notes about what you read.  I will ask you to reflect on it in class.
  3. New York Times “Food” and “Travel” sections

Read for class 6

  • For next class I would like you to do some brief reading and explain the concepts you read about to your classmates. ¬†You will each have a partner for this very brief presentation. ¬†I suggest you get in touch with your partner(s) via Open Lab (click on members). You may also wish to meet a few minutes before class¬†to¬†coordinate who will say what. ¬†My suggestion is that one student gives the definition and the other give examples.
  • In class give a brief definition that is easy to understand by a City Tech student (don’t just read something you read). ¬†See additional notes below. ¬† Use the indicated readings. ¬†If something doesn’t make sense do a little research on the internet to figure it out. ¬†Since you’re presenting as a group figure out who is saying what ahead of time.

◊ Artisanal: student names
Read: Center for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture. (2006) Artisanal Defined.
Define and give us 3 examples of artisanal products and their industrially produced equivalents. Why would culinary tourists care about this?

◊ Authentic: student names
Read: Getz, D. (2014).Foodies and food tourism. Oxford: Goodfellow.  Pg. 77-78.   Available on Blackboard > Content > Getz excerpts.
Define what is generally meant by authentic.  How would personally define it.  Give examples of how and why each of you would find a food experience authentic. Why would a culinary tourist care?

◊ Foodie: student names
Read: Getz, D. (2014).Foodies and food tourism. Oxford: Goodfellow.  Pg. 6-8. Available on Blackboard > Content > Getz excerpts.
Define a foodie.  Give examples of foodie personality traits.  Are you a foodie?  If so why, if not why? How is this issue related to culinary tourism?  Is every culinary tourist a foodie?

◊ Neophile vs. Neophobe: student names
Read: Getz, D. (2014).Foodies and food tourism. Oxford: Goodfellow.  Pg. 70-71 Available on Blackboard > Content > Getz excerpts.
Address the following questions: Are foodies typically neophobes or neophiles?  How does this relate to culinary tourism? How would you define yourself.

◊ Terroir and Locavore: student names
Read: Getz, D. (2014).¬†Foodies and food tourism. Oxford: Goodfellow.¬† Pg. 11.¬†¬†Available on Blackboard > Content > Getz excerpts.¬†Also look up¬† “terroir” definition online (Wikipedia is OK) and read the advantages of consuming local food on New York’s¬†Greenmarket¬†website?
How is terroir used in describing wine?  How could this also apply to food?   Define locavore. What motivation does this create for the culinary tourist. How are both of these relevant to food tourism?

◊ The Other: student names
Read: Long, L. (2004). Culinary tourism. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky. Pg. 23-32. Available on Blackboard > Content > Long excerpts
Define the idea and give examples that relate to food. ¬†How is this issue related to culinary tourism?¬† Who is “the other” to you?

◊ Edible vs. Palatable: student names
Read: Long, L. (2004). Culinary tourism (Material worlds). Lexington: University Press of Kentucky. Pg. 32-34. Available on Blackboard > Content > Long excerpts.
Define the idea and give examples that relate to the taste of main-stream Americans and then give an example of each for each of yourselves  personally.  How is this issue related to culinary tourism?

Read for class 10

  1. Getz, D. (2014). Chapter 9: The role of media and social media in promoting food and drink tourism in  Foodies and food tourism. Oxford: Goodfellow.  Available on Blackboard > Content.
  2. Liu, B. J., Norman, W. C., Backman, S. J., Cuneo, K., & Condrasky, M. (2012). Shoot, taste and post: an exploratory study of food and tourism experiences in an online image-share community. e-Review of Tourism Research, 10(3).
  3. Read pg 10-15: Skift Team and The Catalan Tourism Board (2017) Case Study Catalonia: How the Food Economy Drives Sustainable Tourism Development
  4. New York Times “Food” and “Travel” sections

Read for class 12

  1. Oates,G. (2015) Tourism Australia Uses Food to Drive Luxury Travel Spending. Skift.
  2. Failte Ireland (2016) Enhancing Irish Food Experiences
  3. New York Times “Food” and “Travel” sections

 

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