Summaries

This is where you will upload your chapter summaries. You are to provide not only key terms and concepts, but your interpretation of them:

  • Start with a couple of sentences to describe the chapter – “This chapter focuses on sales…”
  • Then you will provide a summary of the key terms and concepts in number format which includes the textbook definition followed by your example.

1. Empowerment- Textbook def: The act of granting authority to employees to make key decisions within their areas of responsibility. My example: A waitress is empowered by a manager that trusts her to make good decisions when it comes to tough customers. For instance, she can get a steak remade without permission.

If you have questions, please ask!

105 thoughts on “Summaries

  1. Daniella Martinez

    Daniella Martinez
    HMGT 1101
    Prof. Duchamp

    The first chapter of the textbook talks a little about the history behind hospitality like where it started, what symbols were used to represent hospitality and the characteristics that define the hospitality industry. The main priority in the hospitality and restaurant Industry is the consumer themself.

    1) Corporate Philosophy: Embraces the values of the organization, including ethics, morals, fairness and equality.
    Example: The waitress was very polite to ask if my son needed a toddler seat for the table, and told me that if I needed anything else to let her know.
    2) Empowerment: Increased productivity, and guest employee satisfaction.
    Example: Mr. Williams arrived late to a bed and breakfast hotel, but really wanted to have breakfast. The menu changed a few minutes before twelve for the evening menu. The waiter was very lenient and decided to complete Mr. William’s request and brought him breakfast for lunch.
    3) Goal: The objective of participating as a group to fulfill the guest’s needs
    Mrs. Vick made a complain to the front desk about a leak in the kitchen faucet and she also mentioned that her AC wasn’t working properly.The front desk then contacted the hotel’s plumber and in a matter of minutes the job was fixed, and Mrs. Vick was very thankful of the job.
    4) Heart of the House: Someone who is serving someone in the front of the house.
    The manager wasn’t serving the guest, but was helping the front desk manager who was helping the guest arrange a new payment method.
    5) Front of the House: The person attending the guest.
    Example: Mr. Roberts made a phone call from the airport to the hotel explaining that he was going to be just a little late, but the front desk manager was understanding and told him that the room will be available for him.
    6) Hospitality: Friendliness, warmth, cheer, graciousness and conviviality.
    Example: As story tells, pineapples were placed on gateposts and infront of doors to announce to others about a get together. Ever since, pineapples are known as the symbols of hospitality.
    7) Inseparability: Production and consumption of the service product, which presents a special challenge because each guest may have their own request
    Example: Giselle will rather have her meat cooked well done rather than medium rare unlike the rest of her family chose.
    8) Intangible: There’s no access to a product unless it’s for guest’s use only. (No taking advantage)
    Example: The catering team had organized all foods for the wedding’s reception area, but no one was allowed to eat until after the bride and groom arrived.
    9) National Restaurant Association: Forecasts a need for thousands of supervisors and managers for the hospitality and tourism industries.
    Example: Head Chef suggests that the kitchen crew cooks up an unusual meal to “wow” their guests at the Garden Inn Hotel and have them have a good impression so they can return once more.
    10) Return on Investment: People invest money so that a hotel can run a business and they can expect a fair return on their investment.
    Example: Rosa was very pleased at the Plaza Hotel because even though she spent 500 dollars overall including her room, she had an awesome time.
    11) Total Quality Management: Quality leadership at an institute.
    Example: I decided to host my sister’s bachelorette party and with the help of the hotel’s concierge, I was able to arrange a spa night for all the girls.
    12) Tourism: Several sectors of the hospitality industry can involve theme parks, attractions, cruise lines, resorts, and air lines etc.
    Example: The Rodriguez family is taking a vacation on a cruise to Disneyland because of the good reviews they’ve read online.
    13) Sustainability: The ability to achieve continuing economic prosperity while protecting the natural resources of the planet and providing a high quality life for it’s people and future generations.
    Example: Rene Redzepi thought of joining an urban farm along with his restaurant business providing himself the resources needed for kitchen duty.
    14) Perishability: A loss for owners and shareholders.
    Example: 100 rooms were not sold at the Hilton Hotel therefore there was a lost of inventory and revenue.
    15) Guest Satisfaction: Striving to lead guest loyalty.
    Example: Lola made a complain to the front desk about noisy tenants across her room. The front desk arranged a new room for her with no extra cost.

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  2. Daniella Martinez

    Daniella Martinez
    HMGT 1101
    Prof. Duchamp

    The first chapter of the textbook explains the qualities and characteristics in the Hospitality and Restaurant industry. Throughout history, Hospitality has grown to a new extent and the main priority of the industry is the customer them-self. The chapter also explains the process involved to succeed in this type of institute.

    1) Corporate Philosophy: Embraces the values of the organization, including ethics, morals, fairness and equality.
    Example: The waitress had asked if my son needed a toddler chair for the table and I said yes and she offered her help for anything else that we needed.
    2) Empowerment: Increased productivity and guest employee satisfaction.
    Example: Mr. Will arrived late to a bed and breakfast hotel. Unfortunately the menu had changed a few minutes before twelve for the evening menu. The waiter though, was very lenient and fulfilled Mr. Will’s request.
    3) Goal: The objective of participating as a group to fulfill the guest’s needs.
    Example: Anna made a complain to the front desk about a leak in her kitchen and she also mentioned that her AC wasn’t working properly. In a matter of minutes, the hotel’s plumber and electricity crew were at her door and fixed the problem.
    4) Guest Satisfaction: Striving to lead guest loyalty.
    Example: Lola made a complain to the front desk of noisy tenants across her room. The front desk then arranged a new room for her with no extra cost.
    5) Heart of the House: Someone who is serving the Front of the House.
    Example: The manager was helping the Front desk manger with a customer who was willing to use a new payment method.
    6) Front of the House: Someone serving the guest.
    Example: The front desk manager helped accommodate a young couple who made no reservations prior to arriving at the hotel.
    7) Hospitality: Friendliness, warmth, cheer, graciousness and conviviality.
    Example: As history tells, Pineapples were the representation of hospitality therefore people knew that when they were left in front of their doors of gateposts, it meant to get together.
    8) Inseparability: Production and consumption of the service product, which presents a special challenge because each guest may have their own requests.
    Example: Anna asked for her meat to be cooked well done unlike her family that requested their meat medium rare.
    9) Intangible: There’s no access to a product unless it’s for the guest”s use only. (off-limits)
    Example: The catering team had organized all foods for the wedding’s reception area, but no one was allowed to taste before the actual bride and groom arrived.
    10) National Restaurant Association: Forecasts a need for thousands of supervisors and managers for the hospitality and tourism industries.
    Example: Head chef suggests that the kitchen crew cooks up an unusual meal to “wow” their guests and have them have a good impression so they can return once more.
    11) Return Investment: People invest money to run a business and they expect a fair return on their investment.
    Example: Laura spent about $500 overall including her room at the Plaza Hotel, but she doesn’t regret it because she had an awesome time. The service was amazing.
    12) Total Quality Management: Quality Leadership in an institute.
    Example: I decided to host my sister’s bachelorette party and with the help of the hotel’s concierge, I was able to arrange a spa night for all the girls.
    13) Tourism: Several sectors of the hospitality industry can involve theme parks, attractions, cruise lines, resorts, airlines etc.
    Example: The Rodriguez family took a cruise vacation to Florida because of all the good reviews they’ve read online.
    14) Sustainability: The ability to achieve continuing an economic prosperity while protecting the natural resources of the planet and providing a high quality life for people and future generations.
    Example: Rene Redzepi thought of joining an urban farm along with his restaurant providing himself the resources needed for kitchen duty.
    15) Perishability: A loss for owners and shareholders.
    Example: 100 rooms were not sold at the Hilton hotel, therefore they lost revenue.

    Reply
  3. Kristen T.

    Kristen Tsui
    9/26/15
    Professor Duchamp

    Hospitality through the ages to the twentieth century.
    The concept of hospitality was never known as what it is now. The first record of element the connect to hospitality was about 4,500 years B.C.E. The term hospitality came from the french word hospice which mean provide care and shelter for traveler. This was the beginning of hospitality where many ideas startled base on hospitality.
    Term:
    Corporate Philosophy: Embrace the value of the organization, including ethics, morals, fairness and equality.
    (My company have to have the employees to know the company corporate philosophy.)
    Empowerment: Increase productivity and guest and employee satisfaction.
    ( My manager complimented me which empower me to continue to work hard.)
    Front of the house:The people who are serving the guest.
    (Working the front of the house you get to wear the penguin outfit.)
    NRA: Forecast a need for thousands of supervisor and manager for the hospitality and tourism industries.
    Hospitality:The friendly and generous reception and entertainment of guests, visitors, or strangers (Pineapple).
    ( The service and goods you receive from restaurant or hotel are all part of hospitality.)
    Heart of the House: The people performing duties behind the scene.
    ( I prefer the behind the scene working cause that where the fun start. Through the world of culinary arts)
    Intangible: The guest cannot “test drive”a night’s stay or “taste the steak” before dining.
    ( Once a customer ask me if I can get him a entree to try but I told i dont have the authority to do so and handed it over to my manager and till today I still find that question weird.”
    Perishability: The unique dimension of our industry of their product.
    Inseparability: Production and consumption of the service product, which present a special challenge because each guest may have his or her own request.
    Return on Investment: People investing money in businesses and expect fair returns and investment
    ( I invest in my uncle restaurant because I know I get to earn some money throughout college.)
    Total quality management: a comprehensive and structured approach to organizational
    Goal: a mission by participating in goal and objective setting.
    Sustainability: the ability to achieve continuing economic prosperity while protecting the natural resources of the planet and providing a high quality of life for it people and future generation.
    Tourism: organization of vacations and visits to places of interest.
    Guest satisfaction: Goods and Service that reach or surpass customer expectation.
    ( Working in the hospitality field you have to make every guest feel satisfied just like if you want to have the satisfaction when you go in the restaurant.)

    Reply
  4. Victoria A. Gaston

    Victoria Gaston September 24th, 2015
    Professor Damien Duchamp
    HMGT1101

    “Chapter Summary”

    Chapter one focuses on the fast growing and the largest industries in the world, which are the hospitality and tourism industries. The chapter discusses a lot about guest services, and guest satisfactory; being able to give the guest an experience that they will remember. Hospitality businesses are ran 24/7, every day of the year, so you can only image the importance of each position that’s held within this industry. Due to this 24-hour business, each company has a corporate philosophy set up that forms the entire operation of the business itself that all employees must recognized and remember while working. These philosophies do change often, to create a better experience for all guests. It says in the chapter that corporate philosophy “embraces values of the organization, including ethics, morals, fairness, and equality. The philosophy of “do whatever it takes” is critical for success.” Guest satisfaction is a big goal within the hospitality industry, and with these core beliefs, it will help create an environment where guest satisfaction is recognized often. Employees that also take the company’s mission statement with them as they work can bring the guest satisfaction rates up as well, giving guest the chance to experience what kind of business the company is. Chapter one also discusses the differences between hospitality businesses and other businesses, as well as how TQM has helped with many company’s guest services. Chapter one refers back to the beginning of when hospitality was first recognized in different countries up onto the present time. It is suggested that getting involved in the industry is something people may want to consider.l

    1. Corporate Philosophy- Textbook def: The core beliefs that drive a company’s basic organizational structure. My example: Disney’s corporate philosophy is “We create Happiness”, the guest services within Disney does their best to follow this core belief so that the company can continue to make smiles happen.
    2. Empowerment- Textbook def: The act of granting authority to employees to make key decisions within their areas of responsibility. My example: A server at the Standard Hotel is trusted enough by a manger, to make beneficial decisions when it comes to the guests; such as being able to put in a comp. for any guest who was unhappy with a meal and/or beverage.
    3. Front of the house- Textbook def: Comprises all areas with which guests come in contact, including the lobby, corridors, elevators, guest rooms, restaurants and bars, meeting rooms, and restrooms. Also refers to employees who staff these areas. My example: Victoria is a hostess at the Standard Hotel, Highline location in Manhattan. She hosts at the Plaza restaurant within the hotel, greeting, seating, and assisting all guest.
    4. Goal- Textbook def: A specific result to be achieved: the end result of a plan. My example: A cooks main goal is to create a meal that will in the end satisfy and meet all expectation of the guest.
    5. Guest Satisfaction- Textbook def: The desired outcome of hospitality services. My example: As a hostess at the Standard Highline, Victoria strives for great guest satisfaction by making all guest feel comfortable during their stay at the Plaza by seating them and their parties at tables that best fit their needs. Victoria interacts with all guests and continuously checks in with them throughout their stay to be sure that they are enjoying themselves.
    6. Heart of the house- Textbook def: The back of the house. My example: Dishwashers within a restaurant are stationed in the back of the house, maintaining the cleanliness of all eating utensils, and cooking equipment.
    7. Hospitality- Textbook def: 1. The cordial and generous reception of guests. 2. A wide range of businesses, each of which is dedicated to the service of people away from home. My example: Hosting dinners, or any other events that requires you to offer services to guests.
    8. Inseparability- Textbook def: The interdependence of hospitality services offered. My example: Guest who can participate in viewing products that are under constructed or products that will become of service for guest, giving their own opinions on the product.
    9. Intangible- Textbook def: Something that cannot be touched. My example: Guest cannot touch anything in the mini-fridge unless they are paying for any of the items.
    10. National Restaurant Association (NRA)- The association representing restaurant owners and the restaurant industry. My example: An associate within the NRA seeks different restaurants around the world that they can represent. For instance, Bill works for the NRA and he recently began a partnership with iHop, allowing him to represent their franchise.
    11. Perishability- Textbook def: The limited lifetime of hospitality products: for example, last nights vacant hotel room cannot be sold tonight. My example: Services that only exist during the time of its production, the time its being offered; if it’s being used it cannot be sold again.
    12. Return on investment- Textbook def: An important financial measure that determines how well management uses business assets to produce profit. It measures the efficiency with which financial resources available to a company are employed by management. ROI 5 Annual Profit divided by Average Amount Invested. My example: The value of a product (hotel room) that was not used, divided by the amount that’s invested into the product (hotel room). Making a profit over an unused room.
    13. Sustainability- Textbook def: The ability to achieve continuing economic prosperity while protecting the natural resources of the planet and providing a high quality of life for its people and future generations. My example: The incorporation of “green living” within companies and/or individuals.
    14. Total Quality Management (TQM)- Textbook def: A managerial approach that integrates all of the functions and related processes of a business such that they are all aimed at maximizing guest satisfaction through ongoing improvement. My example: When employees can/will do any and everything to solve all guest-related problems, such as if a guest is unsatisfied by the room that they booked, an employee can do what the can to give the guest a room that they can be happy with staying in.
    15. Tourism- Textbook def: Travel for recreation or the promotion and arrangement of such travel. My example: An American girl who enjoys traveling to different countries to experience many new adventures.

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  5. London

    Chapter 1: Summary – Key Words & Concepts (By: Paulette Powell)

    1. Corporate Philosophy: (Textbook Definition – Embraces the values of the organization, including ethics, morals, fairness and equality).
    M.E: Staff members who choose to embody the corporate philosophy individually within each of the key roles in which they play, will have the ability to apply the same technique(s) when working together as a team. Therefore encompassing the newest philosophy of doing, “Whatever it takes” over the, “It’s not my job,” which is critical for a successful business.

    2. Empowerment: (Textbook Definition – The act of granting authority to employees to make key decisions within their areas of responsibility).
    M.E: Allowing staff the opportunity to resolve issues/situations which may arise within their jurisdiction. The ability to make decisions with minimal supervision. So if a guest didn’t like something and wanted it changed (within reason), the staff member would find an alternate replacement to compensate the guest for being inconvenienced.

    3. Front of the House: (Textbook Definition – Is anyone who is in direct contact with the guest).
    M.E: Front of house staff are considered the first point-of-contact (POC). This is where the “moment of truth” comes in. Front of house staff are the ones that set the tone for the remainder of the guests(s) visit. If the meet and greet have substance, then the experiences that follow should complement it, or vice versa.

    4. Goal: (Textbook Definition – Is a specific target to be met).
    M.E: To be given a task with the expectation(s) of completing the task in a correct, efficient, and timely manner, and to one’s satisfaction.

    5. Guest Satisfaction: (Textbook Definition – The delivery of services and the guest’s impression of them).
    M.E: From the moment of truth, until its home time, every guest wants/deserves a great experience. When they get home, and can speak highly of the treatment they’ve encountered, and not just about the beautiful scenery they enjoyed, that is the epitome of “guest satisfaction.” When your great customer service is the topic of conversation, you will always want to come back for more.

    6. Heart of the House: (Textbook Definition – Is anyone who is in the “back of the house” performing duties behind the scenes).
    Example: The “heart of the house” belongs to the unnoticed, but non-the-less appreciated staff members. They keep things operating behind the scenes. Like a well, oiled machine, with tasks such as: Laundry staff and facilities management (plumbing etc…).

    7. Hospitality: (Textbook Definition – Is a sign of friendliness, warmth, cheer, graciousness and conviviality).
    M.E: When treating your guests or fellow employee with, your genuine nature/personality of warmth, kindness, generosity, friendliness and respect. Making your guests stay worth its while.

    8. Inseparability: (Textbook Definition – The non-separation of production and consumption of the service product).
    M.E: “The open kitchen/diners concept,” where some restaurants or establishments like their guests to be able to view the process/steps the kitchen staff take in the production of their meals, before they get to taste the delightful concoction. It’s quite entertaining for the guest, and then of course there’s the bar! 

    9. Intangible: (Textbook Definition – Meaning the guest cannot “test drive” a night’s stay or “taste the steak” before dining).
    M.E: Items/goods the hotel provides for the guests to use during their stay, to ensure their comfort needs are met. Such as electronics (T.V), personal safes, hair dryers etc.

    10. National Restaurant Association (NRA): (Textbook Definition – is one of the hospitality industry’s leading associations, providing programs to enhance your professional development).
    M.E: The NRA is the largest food service trade association in the world. Their mission serve their members by advancing and protecting America’s restaurant and foodservice industry. Leading them into a new era of prosperity, prominence and participation, enhancing the quality of life for all we serve.

    11. Perishability: (Textbook Definition – Something that is considered a loss, ruined or destroyed).
    M.E: When a hotel doesn’t sell a room or room booking is cancelled (they lose money). The same would apply to a restaurant if they were to have reservations booked in advance giving you a full house for the night and then come the last minute cancellations, which causes the business to now loses money, because they’re stuck with open seats, that could have been given to walk-in guests.

    12. Total Quality Management (TQM): (Textbook Definition – Is a participatory process that empowers all levels of employees to work in groups to establish guest service expectations and determine the best way to meet or exceed these expectations).
    M.E: TQM is very similar to Quality Assurance (QA), which is a business standard that ensures that the guests overall service experience remains at the highest level(s), at all times and in every way.

    13. Tourism: (Textbook Definition – Travel and tourism services are necessary to meet the needs and wants of people away from home).
    M.E: When providing services to a guest, who has travelled away from home. Being able to fulfill the guest’s needs or wants based on what might be accustomed to at home, or have a new desire for (trying something new).

    14. Sustainability: (Textbook Definition – The ability to achieve continuing economic prosperity, while protecting the natural resources and providing a high quality of life for its people and future generations).
    M.E: Some ways in which the hospitality industry is trying to remain prosperous while protecting natural resources is by, sourcing and using local products and merchants, which economically helps local area.

    15. Return on Investment: (Textbook Definition – People who invest money for us to run a business’ expect to see a fair return on their investment. A profit!).
    M.E: In everything we do that involves time and money, is an investment in something being made. If a chef puts time and effort into the preparation of your meal, the expected return on that investment is that you, 1. Enjoyed what you were served, 2. Want more and 3. Would complement/recommendations. Similar to, if you invest financially into the hospitality business in some way, you would expect to make some financial profit, through the services provided.

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  6. SoniaJ

    Chapter 1 Summary – S.Jobity
    Professor Duchamp – 1101

    Chapter one focuses on the beginning of Hospitality. How it was derived from Ancient Times from hunting, growing crops to renting space in your home to travelers. It also speaks about how it is the best time to get into the Hospitality Industry as it always looking for supervising managers and the different position it offers and how to get to these positions.
    1. Corporate Philosophy- Textbook Def: The core beliefs that drive a company’s basic organizational structure. My Example: “The best experience possible” by having your guest stay at the hotel feel as if they were home away from home.
    2. Empowerment- Textbook Def: The act of giving the employees the authority, tools, and information they need to do their jobs with greater autonomy. My Example: The Assistant Pastry Chef was empowered when the Head Pastry Chef gave her the tools she needed to make a 5 Tier Wedding Cake.
    3. Front of The House- Textbook Def: Comprises all areas with which guests come in contact, including the lobby, corridors, elevators, guest rooms, restaurants and bars, meeting rooms, and restrooms. Also refers to employees who staff these areas. My Example: Working at a not so fancy restaurant, I get to meet many guests making their first experience memorable.
    4. Goal-Textbook Def: A specific result to be achieved; the end result of a plan. My Example: Pastry Chef Sonia’s goal is to execute beautiful and delicious desserts that will leave her guests wanting more.
    5. Guest Satisfaction- Textbook Def: The desired outcome of hospitality services. My Example: Debs checked into her room very late and was hungry. She called and asked if the kitchen was open to find out it was closed. The attendant ordered food from an outside vendor for Debs so she wouldn’t feel hungry.
    6. Heart of the House- Textbook Def: Back of the House. My Example: Todd made sure that Bill the server received his food at an appropriate time as to serve his guests.
    7. Hospitality- Textbook Def: 1) The cordial and generous reception of guests 2) A wide range of businesses, each of which is dedicated to the services of people away from home. My Example: When Dana gets a room ready for her guests, she loves putting a piece of chocolate on the pillows shaped in a heart.
    8. Inseparability- Textbook Def: The interdependence of hospitality services offered. My Example: Justin asked for extra syrup on his ice cream, while Jessica wanted an extra scoop of ice cream instead of the syrup.
    9. Intangible- Textbook Def: Something that cannot be touched. My Example: Sophia offered tasting at her bakery only for customers who were booking a wedding.
    10. National Restaurant Association (NRA) – Textbook Def: The association representing restaurant owners and the restaurant industry. When Janet decided to open her restaurant she wanted to make sure she was a part of the NRA so in case of concerns or questions she can always ask them for advice or information.
    11. Perishability- Textbook Def: The limited lifetime of hospitality products; for example, last night’s vacant hotel room cannot be sold today. My Example: The Local Inn wasn’t able to book the 50 rooms for the night even though they anticipated guests for the forum that was going in the area.
    12. Total Quality Management (TQM)- Textbook Def: A managerial approach that integrates all of the functions and related processes of a business such that they are all aimed at maximizing guest satisfaction through ongoing improvement. My Example: If a guest is very unhappy with their after noticing from the advertisement, that it isn’t the same. The Management changed the guest’s room and gave them extra amenities.
    13. Tourism- Textbook Def: Travel for recreation or the promotion and arrangement of such travel. My Example: When a person enjoys traveling to different countries learning about different cultures. Or when a person just enjoys traveling around the world and staying in different hotels, and/or AirBnB’s.
    14. Sustainability- Textbook Def: The ability to achieve continuing economic prosperity while protecting the natural resources of the planet and providing a high quality of life for its people and future generations. My Example: Making sure that all natural resources are utilized.
    15. Return on Investment (ROI)- Textbook Def: An important financial measure that determines how well management uses business assets to produce profit. It measures the efficiency with which financial resources available to a company are employed by management. My Example: You are trying to make back money on unsold rooms by offering an incentive on future guests…

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  7. Ambre Farrington

    This chapter is an introduction to the hospitality industry. It briefly explains the history of housing and tending to strangers/travelers, how and why taverns and inns began and who the pioneers of the field were. It also explains the subcategories and characteristics of the industry, possible career options, what to expect and how to be successful in hospitality.

    Corporate Philosophy.
    Textbook: The core beliefs that drive a company’s basic organizational structure.
    My Example: The Marriott’s corporate philosophy is to take care of their workers so that their workers are well equipped to care for their guests.
    Empowerment.
    Textbook: The act of giving employees the authority, tools and information they need to do their jobs with greater autonomy.
    My Example: The manager of the hotel empowers workers to deal with customer complaints without having to consult her/him each time a problem arises.
    Front of the house.
    Textbook: Comprises all areas with which guests come in contact, including the lobby, corridors, elevators, guest rooms, restaurants and bars, meeting rooms, and restrooms. Also refers to employees who staff these areas.
    My Example: When dining at a restaurant, customers are greeted, seated and served by front of the house staff.
    Goal.
    Textbook: A specific result to be achieved; the end result of a plan.
    My Example: My goal is to own a restaurant, animal hotels and a bed and breakfast.
    Guest Satisfaction.
    Textbook: The desired outcome of hospitality services.
    My Example: Websites like Yelp are designed to allow patrons to report and discuss their level of guest satisfaction. This can either promote a company or discourage further patronage.
    Heart of the house.
    Textbook: The back of the house.
    My Example: When dining at a restaurant, our food is prepared in the heart of the house.
    Hospitality.
    Textbook: The cordial and generous reception of guests. A wide range of businesses, each of which is dedicated to the service of people away from home. To provide care/shelter for others.
    My Example: Allowing friends, family or even strangers to stay in your home while visiting your state/country and providing them with food and other amenities is considered hospitality.
    Inseparability.
    Textbook: The interdependence of hospitality services offered.
    My Example: In hospitality, the guests’ input is necessary to improve and tailor the services to the guests’ liking. Therefore, in order to provide good service, those on the receiving end must participate in creating it.
    Intangible.
    Textbook: Something that cannot be touched.
    My Example: Certain services provided in hospitality, such as timely responses and reliability, are intangible.
    National Restaurant Association (NRA).
    Textbook: The association representing restaurant owners and the restaurant industry.
    My Example: The NRA is an educational organization that provides community and information to help improve the restaurant business.
    Perishability.
    Textbook: The limited lifetime of hospitality products ; for example, last night’s vacant hotel room cannot be sold today.
    My Example: Food that is not sold before expiration becomes perishable in terms of the profit it could have provided.
    Total Quality Management (TQM).
    Textbook: A managerial approach that integrates all of the functions and related processes of a business such that they are all aiming at maximizing guest satisfaction through ongoing involvement.
    My Example: Each subsection of a hotel must work harmoniously to provide great service to hotel guests.
    Tourism.
    Textbook: Travel for recreation or the promotion and arrangement of such travel.
    My Example: When traveling to explore Machu Picchu, you are a tourist in Peru.
    Sustainability.
    Textbook: The ability to achieve continuing economic prosperity while protecting the natural resources of the planet and providing a high quality of life for its people and future generations.
    My Example: Restaurants who switch old light bulbs to compact flourescent light bulbs conserve energy used and save money that can be reintroduced to their business.
    Return on investment (ROI).
    Textbook: An important financial measure that determines how well management uses businesses assets to produce profit. It measures the efficiency with which financial resources available to a company are employed by management.
    My Example: The time in which a restaurateur can regain the money expended to start their restaurant depends on how efficiently the investment money is used to produce products and service that consumers want.

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  8. Mariama Bah

    Summary

    Chapter one focuses on the Introduction and different aspects to Hospitality. The chapter mentions the History of hospitality and how it began in ancient times (4,500 B.C.E.) up until today. The chapter then goes on to tell us the different parts and stages of the hospitality world, the different careers you can obtain and the average amount of money you can make in each career. After that the chapter goes on to service in hospitality, how you should treat the employees and most importantly the guest.

    Definitions

    1. Corporate Philosophy:

    – Textbook Definition: The core beliefs that drive a company’s basic organizational structure.

    – My Example: The dunkin donuts I used to work for failed to have a strong corporate philosophy which ended in store closings.

    2. Empowerment:

    – Textbook Definition: the act of granting authority to employees to make key decisions within their areas of responsibility.

    – My Example: When I was promoted, when given the tools and directions I felt the empowerment of being a shift leader.

    3. Front of the house:

    – Textbook Definition: comprises all areas with which guest come in contact, including the lobby, corridors, elevators, guest rooms, restaurants and bars, meeting rooms, and restrooms. Also refers to employees who staff these areas.

    – My Example: Customers initial reaction or feelings towards a restaurant is based on the service and attitude of front of house employees.

    4. Goal:

    – Textbook Definition: A specific result to be achieved; the end result of a plan.

    – My Example: One of my goals in life is to have and own my own restaurant.

    5. Guest Satisfaction:

    – Textbook Definition: the desired outcome of hospitality services.

    – My Example: Guest Satisfaction should be a restaurants main priority if they want to keep their business running,

    6. Heart of the house:

    – Textbook Definition: the back of house

    – My Example: The heart of house in a business can be the downfall if not strong enough.

    7. Hospitality:

    – Textbook Definition: 1. the cordial and generous reception of guests.

    2. a wide range of businesses, each of which is dedicated to the service of people away from home.

    – My Example: Olive garden on 42nd street fails at hospitality service.

    8. Inseparability:

    – Textbook Definition: the interdependence of hospitality services offered.

    – My Example: The twins were both born with a sense of inseparability they couldn’t even use the bathroom without each other.

    9. Intangible:

    – Textbook Definition: something that cannot be touched.

    – My Example: The products in a clothing store that are hung up high are intangible

    10. National Restaurant Association (NRA):

    – Textbook Definition: the association representing restaurant owners and the restaurant industry.

    – My Example: The NRA plays an important role for the people who own restaurants.

    11. Perishability:

    – Textbook Definition: the limited lifetime of hospitality products; for example , last night’s vacant hotel room cannot be sold today.

    – My Example: The fridge broke down overnight so the employees had to throw the products out because it was perishable.

    12. Total quality Management (TQM):

    – Textbook Definition: A managerial approach that integrates all of the functions and related processes of a business such that they are all aimed at maximizing guest satisfaction through ongoing improvement.

    – My Example: Having a strong TQM can improve in all aspects of a business.

    13. Tourism:

    – Textbook Definition: travel for recreation or the promotion and arrangement of such travel.

    – My Example: Tourism is on a rise for places such as the United States and Europe.

    14. Sustainability:

    – Textbook Definition: the ability to achieve continuing economic prosperity while protecting the natural resources of the planet and providing a high quality of life for its people and future generations.

    – My Example: the manager is making sustainability standards for the shelf life and storage of food for his diner.

    15. Return on investment:

    – Textbook Definition: An important financial measure that determines how well management uses business assets to produce profit. It measures the efficiency with which financial resources available to a company is being run by management with regard to its ability to generate profits from the assets available to the company.

    – My Example: Before the Return on Investment I was making a good profit of selling food to my neighbors and friends.

    Reply
  9. Joe

    Johandry Veras
    Perspectives in Hospitality Management
    Prof. Damien L. Duchamp
    September 25th, 2015
    Chapter 1 Summaries
    This chapter is focused on the history of Hospitality industry.This chapter is all about how Hospitality industry has been growing. In this chapter you can find the history of Disney world and his founder Walt Disney. It is awesome how the chapter breaks down by time how and from where to where the Hospitality industry was is coming from. Also in this chapter explain how the World War II affected the growth of the industry. something very important mansion in here, the hospitality industry operate the whole year round (365) and 24 hours. The hospitality and tourism industries are the largest and fastest-growing industry grouping in the world. You can get a job at hotels, banks, airport, cruise line, restaurants and a lot more places but honestly this is all about customer service, The profound and most challenging reality of working in this industry is that hospitality employees have the ability to affect the human experience by creating powerful impressions. even brief moment of truth-that might last a lifetime.

    Key Words:
    Moment of truth- A moment of truth is an industry expression used to describe a guest and an associate meeting, as when a guest walks into a restaurant. My example: One day I went to a restaurant and the greeter smiled at me but when I went to her she turned around and called somebody else to talk to me. That is a Moment of truth because I realized that the service was not great.
    1. The spirit to serve- by Jim Collins writing in the foreword to bill Marriott’s book. which means people with a service spirit happy to do something extra to make a guest’s experience memorable. It also means that it is our passion to give pleasure to others. My example: when you see someone being passionate, lovely, and real when they are helping you and do the best to make you happy.
    2. The Pineapple- The Pineapple has enjoyed a rich and romantic heritage as a symbol of welcome,friendship, and Hospitality. My example: When you see pineapples in a restaurant or hotel, that means that they want you to feel warm like at home.
    3. Goal- A goal is a specific target to be met; objectives or tactics are the actions needed to accomplish the goal. My example: Let’s say I am the GM of a hotel and I am talking to my associates: Ladies and Gentlemen we have a goal this summer season to make $2,000,000.00 dollars! lets’ advertise our brand by spring so we can bring those clients and guest in.
    4. Empowerment- The act of granting authority to employees to make key decisions within their areas of responsibility. My example: Jose is the food and beverage manager of a hotel and he is suppose to report the revenue of the restaurant and also the lost of it (like food expired). He is supposed to report (shows) the food before he throws it away but the GM said that he can throw it without reporting it.
    5. A mission statement- is a statement of central purpose, strategies, and values of the company. My example: We as front desk have a mission statement to ask or send a email asking every customer about how was their experience in the hotel and invite them back.
    6. Corporate Culture- Refers to the overall style or feel of the company, or how people relate to one another and their jobs. My example: Every hotel is different, some are more technological, others like to make you connect more with the natural environment.
    7. Front of the house- Comprises all areas with which guests come in contact, including the lobby, corridors, elevators, guest rooms, restaurants and bars, meeting rooms, and restrooms. My example: Maria works for Marriott and she is on charge of the check-in and out and also send emails to the guest who reserve online.
    8. Hospitality- The cordial and generous reception of guests. My example: When you go to restaurants and they have the host waiting for you to passionately take you to a dinner table.
    9. Perishability- The limited lifetime of hospitality products: for example, last night’s vacant hotel room cannot be sold tonight. My example: any available room that was not sold that night is perishabel because you can not make that money next day.
    10. Intangible – Meaning the guest cannot “test drive” a night’s stay or “taste the steak” before dining. My example: everything the hotel provide to their guest to make sure they feel like at home.
    11. Tourism– Travel and tourism services are necessary to meet the needs and wants of people away from home. My example: When you are traveling to New York City for business and you stay a hotel in Times Square because I the hotel that you booked provide everything you want to have as a substitute of your house.
    12. Sustainability- The ability to achieve continuing economic prosperity while protecting the natural resources of the planet and providing a high quality of life for its people and future generations. My example: When you have panel solar to light up at nights.
    13. Guest Satisfaction- The desired outcome of hospitality services. My example: When you are getting the service that you were expecting.
    14. Return on Investment (ROI)- An important financial measure that determines how well management uses business assets to produce profit. It measures the efficiency with which financial resources available to a company are employed by management. My example: when the manager is not using well the business assets to produce profit, it will be measure by the ROI.
    15. National Restaurant Association (NRA) – The association representing restaurant owners and the restaurant industry. My example: Juan has a restaurant so his restaurant must be represented by NRA.

    Reply
  10. Victoria A. Gaston

    Victoria Gaston September 29, 2015
    Professor Damien Duchamp
    HMGT1101

    “Chapter Summary”

    Chapter two focuses on the hotel development and ownerships within small independently owned inns/hotels, to the big luxurious lodging and hotel chains that are functioned using franchising and management contracts. Many hotels and corporations that use franchising to create a successful business within the hospitality industry are mentioned in the chapter, the biggest well-known company being the Ritz-Carlton. Chapter two provides three given points of the possibility of franchising being part of your future if you work for any “hospitality-related organizations”, they were, 1. your career will be influenced by franchising, 2. you might end up working for a franchisee, and 3. you may end up buying a franchise leading into ownership. The chapter also mentions the development of hotels, such as buying property and the cost of not only the property but the high cost and expenses of everything else within the hotel such as, salaries, wages, and benefits, property taxes, and insurance, operating expenses, cost of sales and management fees, which they refer all of these to the “source and disposition of the industry dollar”. The chapter also talks about the classifications of hotels according to their location, types of services that they offer, and how much they cost; not only are the classifications of hotels discussed; but the chapter explains how hotels are rated, they are either given five-star or five-diamond rankings by the Mobil and the AAA (American Automobile Association). Towards the ending of the chapter, it is focused more on the tourism part of the industry, presenting that the future of tourism is depended on the development within vacation ownership, the involvement of foreign investments, international growth and airlines.

    1. Capital Intensive- My example: Dana is prepared to invest a large amount of money into her new business.
    2. Fair Return on Investment- My example: Alex used 40,000 to start his business. He believes that he can return 10,000 yearly to his investors; Alex will then get a 25% return on his investment.
    3. Feasibility Study- My example: Jessica is a lender who determines the sustainability of a business project. She examines the markets demand and supply, and also determines to which extent the hotel projected will be financially successful.
    4. Direct Economic Impact- My example: Victoria owns a hotel, which rooms about 700 guests a night. The guests spend about $300 at her hotel and the many other facilities within the hotel and the community the hotel is located in. Victoria’s hotel will bring in $76,650,000 a year into the local economy.
    5. Indirect Economic Impact- My example: Mel is a manager at Victoria’s hotel, one of his duties is to focus on the money that goes towards the wages and salaries of the employee’s. As well money that the hotel spends for the services they offer at Victoria’s hotel.
    6. Franchising- My example: Dana and Jacob are working together to create a business that they can both benefit from. Dana has the finances that can begin the business, and Jacob has the expertise and recognition that can expand their business.
    7. Management Contracts- My example: Bill has a management contract to have documentation of the specific agreements that will be applied to conduct his business. Within the contract, there are many key points that must be followed to build his business and keep his business in a professional order.
    8. Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) – My example: Dan and Jeremy are small investors who are protected under the REITs; they are able to facilitate investments without having to deal with double taxation of ordinary trusts.
    9. Referral Associations- My example: Chelsea has been in contact with a franchiser who wants to help with her business, but recently she became in contact with an Referral Association that described similar offerings as the franchiser but at a lower cost.
    10. Vacation Ownership- My example: Tim offers Dana a lower cost vacation club offered John a membership for vacation ownership. Using their point base system, John is allowed to choose the type of vacation that he wants, and he can choose to use his vacation points on either a one long vacation or for a series of short vacations.

    Reply
  11. Joe

    Johandry Veras
    Perspectives in Hospitality Management
    Prof. Damien L. Duchamp
    October 6, 2015
    Chapter 2 summary
    Chapter two is all about the difference in hotels. In chapter two explain how the location can impact and/or affect the hotel industry. After franchising the industry has been growing faster and easier. The chapter also tells how the future of tourism involves international expansion and foreign-investment. Also in combination with airlines.It is further influenced by increased globalization, as evidenced by such agreements as NASTA.
    Key Words and examples:
    1. Franchising- In the hospitality industry is a concept that allows a company to expand more rapidly by using other people’s money than if it had to acquire its own financing. My example: I want to Franchise Chipotle.
    2. Management Contrast- Have been responsible for the hotel industry’s rapid boom since 1970s. The manager contrast usually allows for the hotel company to manager the property for a period of five, ten or twenty five years. My example: Jose signed a contrast for ten years as a General Manager (GM) for the Marriott hotel.
    3. Leading Hotel of the World (LHW) – The organization operated by having Hotels advise their guests to use the establishments of fellow member. My example: When I have my hotel I want it to be part of the LHW so my hotel can build fellow members.
    4. Investment- My example: When you are updating your hotel with better furnitures, you are investing which will help you somehow to make the hotel looks prettier and more comfortable the guest.
    5. Revenue- My example: We lost revenue last night because we did not sell all the rooms available.
    6. American Automobile Association (AAA)-My example: When I have my hotel i will make sure to earn the five-diamond award; all i will need to do is to have an excellent team in my hotel for a high level of customer service and very sophisticate and that way when AAA come by, they will realize that how amazing is my hotel.
    7. resort- My example: When I go to Dominican Republic, I love staying in resort rather than Hotels because I actually like all the activities they offer me inside the resort, like hiking, clubs, theater, and much more.
    8. Convention Hotel- My example: In my job, when we have a general meeting, we all go to miami and stay in a convention hotel because they provide large room for meetings.
    9. Casino Hotel- My example: My example: My grandparents love going to Atlantic City because they can stay in a casino hotel like Tropicana and gamble every night.
    10. Condotels and mixed-Use Hotels-My example: I think it is a great idea to buy a condo unit because specially in the summer you can bring the whole family over.
    11. Boutique Hotel- My example: My aunt is a little boring, she like to go to boutique hotel because she says that they are small but the customer service is great.
    12. Economy/Budget Hotels- my example: when Pablo Martinez was in New York, he stood in a Budget Hotel because he said that he did not need to spend much money and anyways he was feeling comfortable.
    13. Vacation Clubs or Programs- my example: there is nothing better than being part of a vacation program because you know that when you are in vacation, you will have somewhere planned to go to and it may be free or cheaper.
    14. Capacity Control- My example: When you have a good person working on the area “Capacity Control”, your hotel should maintain a high occupancy percentage if that person work it out with airlines, autol rental, and tickets to attractions.
    15. Safety and Security- my example: It important to have a safety and security department because in this world now there are a lot of terrorism.
    16. Vacation Ownership: when a person is booking in Jetblue for a flight and that person is in the blue point program, that person can have the opportunity to win a free flight or a cheaper one.

    Reply
  12. Daniella Martinez

    Daniella Martinez
    10/5/15
    Prof. Duchamp
    Chapter 2

    The second chapter of the textbook speaks of the importance and caution there is involved when owning a hotel. Knowing the location of where you want to place a hotel is very crucial for the investment of the guest and the owner as well. Placing the hotel near a convention, business or attraction center creates attention and allows the guest to enjoy the access to anywhere they please. Nowadays, its become extremely competitive and sometimes most hotel companies enter the market with another owner of a hotel (partnership) to work as connections for one another. Also, giving the hotel a “hook-up” helps the guest feel like their money was worth staying at this hotel. For instance, a spa, a laundry facility, dry cleaners, etc. These are things that come in handy for the guest. Going broad with choices is never wrong because the more you expand, the more clientele you’ll have.

    1) Feasibility Study: Before opening a hotel, Pablo did a feasibility study to find out whether the market area he choose was really worth placing his hotel there.
    2) Fair Return On Investment: Mario wanted to place an indoor pool as well a spa in his hotel because he expects to get a fair return on the investment.
    3) Capital Intensive: With a small budget, Sarah debated whether or not it was worth owning a hotel since it takes millions of dollars to develop the property.
    4) Direct Economic Impact: The guest at the Northern Star Hotel have the opportunity to spend their money in places nearby the community.
    5) Indirect Economic Impact: The Northern Star Hotel thought it would be better if the employees themselves used the money provided by the hotel to purchase any item needed to service their guests.
    6) Referral Associations: The Marriott Hotel shares a common image with the Garden Inn Hotel and as a result, refer their guests to each others.
    7) Vacation Ownership: During the Summer time, Darlene was given the opportunity to own a vacation accommodation for 5 years with the points she earned at a vacation club program.
    8) REITs: The owner of The Tipton hotel made a wise choice by purchasing stocks from a REIT and REIT earns a share of the income produced through real estate investment.
    9) Management Contracts: The owner of the Garden Inn Hotel is seeking sustainability and a bigger share of the business. Therefore, the owner held a management contract to provide operational expertise.
    10) Franchising: Rosa decides that she wants to open a McDonald’s restaurant which will allow her to use the same type of operating system just like any other McDonald.

    Reply
  13. Mariama Bah

    Mariama Bah
    Professor Damien Duchamp
    HMGT 1101
    September 5,2015

    Chapter Summary

    Chapter Two focuses on all aspects of the Hotel Business. The chapter talks about hotel development and ownerships. Franchising and management contracts being two of the main aspects in the hotel operation business. The chapter then goes on to break down the different types of hotel, locations and prices. Some of the type of Hotels are resorts, airport, freeway, casino , convention, boutique hotels and many more. Hotels are Classified according to the location, price and the type of services that are being offered. So a casino hotel can be a luxury, midscale or economy type of hotel.

    Key Words and Concepts

    1. Capital Intensive: My Example – Melissa had a conversation with John regarding capital intensive and they are getting ready to spend a lot of money on there new restaurant.

    2. Fair return on Investment: My Example – After investing half a million into a new hotel, Aria believes once the hotel opens she would make enough profit to have a fair return on investment.

    3. Feasibility study: My Example – Before investing on a new building project the company had to do a feasibility study to see if investing in this building would be deemed successful in the end.

    4. Direct economic impact: My Example – Steve owns hotel with an average of 150 rooms a night who spend $350 at the hotel and restaurant in the end his hotel will bring in $19,162,500 a year into the local economy.

    5. Indirect economic impact: My Example – Mary is the hotel manager and she has to manage the money that comes into the hotel and what is spent for the wages and salaries of the employees.

    6. Franchising: My Example – I plan to own several franchised restaurants in the future.

    7. Management contracts: My Example – Danny has a management contract with the hotel he works for that pinpoints his full responsibilities for operating and managing the hotel property efficiently,

    8. Real estate investment trusts (REITs): My Example – A group of small investors looking to open a business made sure they were protected under REITS in order to avoid double taxation.

    9. Referral associations: My Example – Randy was looking for a franchiser to help open up his business, in the process he came across referral associations at a lower price.

    10. Vacation Ownership: My Example – The hotel offered three of there well known customers vacation ownership which allowed them to choose the type of vacation they wanted and the duration of the vacation.

    Reply
  14. Ambre Farrington

    Chapter 2 Summary

    This chapter discusses how franchising, management contracts and referral associations began and why this method of expansion is still growing today. Since 1907, companies have utilized franchisees to replicate their business and business model in many locations around the world, creating their own empire. The chapter also discusses the various types of hotels (resort, airport, economy, boutique) with price ranges, as well as vacation ownership or timeshares (a rapidly growing segment of the tourism industry).

    1.Capital intensive – Buying a restaurant franchise requires a large sum of money upfront plus continuing fees.
    2.Fair return on investment – Sponsors await the success of my new business as this ensures the return of the money they invested in my start-up.
    3.Feasibility study – Sponsors/lenders of my restaurant start-up require a feasibility study to assess my business’ probability of success.
    4.Direct economic impact – My bed and breakfast houses six guests a night, who spend money on local travel, restaurants, theaters, and other activities.
    5.Indirect economic impact – The Uber driver who drove my guests to a local steakhouse uses her money to purchase a new blouse from a local boutique.
    6.Franchising – I want to build my bakery brand across the U.S., so I’m selling it to three people who can open a smaller division in their home states.
    7.Management contracts – I operate my chain of restaurants by providing operational and marketing expertise for a percentage of gross revenue.
    8.Real estate investment trusts (REITs) – Three investors contributing $670,000, $120,000 and $450,000 can combine their investments to purchase a property in downtown Brooklyn and rent out luxury apartments.
    9.Referral associations – Instead of combining funds to open one large hotel, four friends each open a bed and breakfast with the same CRS, logo and design and refer their guests to one another.
    10.Vacation ownership – Jack and Jill have a timeshare in the Poconos to vacation with their family any time of the year.

    Reply
  15. SoniaJ

    Chapter 2 Summary – S.Jobity
    Professor Duchamp – 1101

    Chapter two focuses on the business aspect of hotels. The ownership, investing, management, and franchising of hotels. How they are classified by price, location and types of service offered. It goes in to detail and breaks down these three classifications, showing how location matters when deciding to open a hotel. Also it touches upon tourism in the industry, how it is important for foreign investments.

    1. Capital Intensive: My Example: Owning or investing in building a hotel takes a good bit of money (millions) to develop it.

    2. Fair Return on Investment: My Example: When someone invest in a property and expect to get at least half of their money back when the business starts to grow.

    3. Feasibility Study: My Example: Juan invested money into building a restaurant, he contacted lenders and did research on the property and the area to make sure his investment was guaranteed.

    4. Direct Economic Impact: My Example: When guests spend their money in the hotel and the community

    5. Indirect Economic Impact: My Example: After working hard at the front desk, Cantor decided to shop locally in the commuting area instead of traveling back home.

    6. Franchising: My Example: Matt decided he was ready to own his own Gustaff’s, even though he had the money he didn’t have the expertise to do that.
    7. Management Contracts: My Example: Infinity Hotels decided to have management contracts to make running the hotel easier when it was time to run them.

    8. Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs): My Example: After Matt was good with his financing he made sure to protect himself by investing in a REITs.

    9. Referral Associations: My Example: So since Matt is pretty small he decided to get involved with another similar business as to bring more guests.

    10. Vacation Ownership: My Example: Juan and Cantor decided it was time for a vacation but couldn’t decide on where to go. They then both decided to get involved in point-based program where they were able to use multiple vacation spots.

    Reply
  16. Erick T

    Chapter 2 Summary:
    This chapter has a lot of important information in regards to how difficult (in terms of money) opening a hotel can be. There is a lot of work that has to go into opening a hotel, and investors have to make sure that they are getting some profit by analyzing feasibly studies. The chapter talks about how franchising can be risky for business owners, and directly outlines the pros and cons. The chapter also talks about how hotels are classified. Such examples include but are not limited to convention hotels, economy/budget hotels, boutique hotels, and casino hotels. Whilst diversity amongst hotels existed, there are some hotels that offer unique services and have often bizarre characteristics when you stay at one. The chapter also describes a brief description about how some hotels are as successful as they are now.

    1. Capital intensive: Something requiring a lot of capital.
    My example: A hotel requires a lot of sources to build, like money, space, and time.

    2. Fair return on investment: a reasonable return for the amount invested.
    My example: The profit made from putting in a certain amount of money to open up the hotel.

    3. Feasibility study: examines the market areas demand and supply, including any potential or real competition in the pipeline.
    My example: A study that examines the how well shakeshack will do in a certain area, which outlines the main competitors such as Bareburger.

    4. Direct economic impact: The impact that comes from just the amount of moneu generated simply by staying at a hotel.
    My example: The amount of money Holiday Inn charges would affect the prices around where its located.

    5. Indirect economic impact: The long term impact caused by ripple effects.
    My example: Holiday inn affects the prices of its competitors.

    6. Franchising: concept that allows a company to expand more rapidly by using other peoples money than if it had to acquire its own financing.
    My example: Mcdonald’s selling the rights to the restaurant, and begins to expand overseas internationally whilst still profiting the owners of the brand.

    7. Management contracts: a written agreement between an owner and an operator of a hotel or motor inn by which the owner employs the operator as an agent (employee) to assume full responsibility for operating and managing a property.
    My example: A contract a manager has to sign when employed that states that he/she is responsible for the operations of the hotel.

    8. Real estate investment trusts: A method that enables small investors to combine their funds and enables small investors to combine their funds and protects them from the double taxations levies against an ordinary corporations or trust; designed to facilitate investments in real estate in much the same way a mutual fund facilitates investment in securities.

    9. Referral associations: associations that refer guests to other participating members.
    My example: Getting discounts to a restaurant if you work or stay at a specific hotel.

    10. Vacation ownership: Offers consumers the opportunity to purchase fully furnished vacation accommodations in a variety of forms, such as weekly intervals or points in a point based systems, for a percentage of the cost of full ownerships.

    Reply
  17. London

    Chapter 2: Summary – The Hotel Business

    This chapter provides a historic transformation of U.S hotels. From conception when they were first know as, “Inn’s” to it’s manifestation of what some are now known today as, “Boutique Hotels.” In between this centuries old, ever evolving, places of business and pleasure, we are taught about hotel development, ownership, current trends, with major emphasis on franchising, considering most hotels are exactly that, huge “Franchises!” Attention is paid to hotel classification, because of the levels of hotel diversity that are available, you just simply cannot paint all hotels with the same brush. The type/style, “location-location-location”, and budget, are all major factors.
    Last, but not least; we get to meet some of the hotel industries, “Crème de la crème and their unique competitor’s. Below are some terms that help shed some light on small part of a bigger process.

    1. Capital Intensive: (M.E) I have a large sum of money of which I’m willing to invest into a hotel development project, I would have to base my decision on how money is needed, to how much labor would be required to do the job.

    2. Fair Return on Investment: (M.E) If Roxanne purchased a property for $10 million, and later sold it for $15 million. The return on investment, would be the difference between the initial purchase price, and the amount gained from the sale. Roxanne gained $5 million from the sale, which is 30% > in profit.

    3. Feasibility Study: (M.E) If, I’m choosing to invest in hotel development project, it is in my best interest to first assess of the practicality of a proposed plan or method.

    4. Direct Economic Impact: Is when guests are spending their monies, within the hotels and restaurants, as well as at the local shops within the surrounding community. Such as site-seeing and shopping for souvenirs, this brings in revenue to that same community.

    5. Indirect Economic Impact: The opposite effect occurs, when the hotel employees start spending their pay checks in the same manner and places, in which the guests are, because it’s the same money the hotel uses to service the guests.

    6. Franchising: M.E: I’m an opportunist and so I chose to invest my money in to this growing franchise business, in order to expand the business and its brand, and of course to make a return on my investment.

    7. Management Contracts: (M.E) Allows me to provide my area(s) of operational expertise, such as, marketing, operations management, without the ownership of the property.

    8. Real Estate Investment Trusts (REIT): This special type investment in real estate, allows the investor to make money, as well as receive special tax benefits (i.e. a lower tax rate), but there are certain restrictions and the REIT is required to distribute at least 90% of its profits to shareholders (you & I). In other words you might find a small percentage of a n REIT in your 401K or IRA.

    9. Referral Associations: Are similar to franchise agreements, just not a strict. Referral associations allow me to be able to refer my guests to other hotels, therefore providing them with more variety to choose from.

    10. Vacation Ownership: Where an individual chooses the investment vehicle of owning only shares in the property, verses full ownership. A good example would be a “Time Share, Vacation Property.”

    Reply
  18. Kristen T.

    Kristen Tsui

    10/4/15

    Pro.Duchamp

    HMGT 1101

    Chapter 2 summary

    The development of hotel industry from inns to big hotel that provides much more goods and services throughout the time period. The first type of inns was discovered during 1634 and was considered the first tavern which lead to many idea and influence the modern hotel and inns now. Many inns and hotel are now not only giving goods and services they follow the trend that captivate people bringing more attention to them. Here are the Keyword:

    Capital Intensive: a business that needs a huge amount of money to invest in the business.

    Fair Return on Investment: A return of investment that must be fair or similar to the amount that was invested in the business.

    Feasibility Study: A trial time for a plan or method that was proposed.

    Direct Economic Impact: A data that is base on the total amount of additional expenditure within a chosen geographical area.

    Indirect Economic Impact: The relationship between on form economic activity generated by a specific a policy or event.

    Franchising: A practice that allow people to buy a brand name or model and open a business for a period of time.

    Management Contracts: arrangement under which operational control of an enterprise is vested by contract in a separate enterprise that performs the necessary managerial functions in return for a fee.

    Real Estate Investment Trusts: a closed-end investment company that owns assets related to real estate such as buildings, land.

    Referrals Association: It is a type of hotel that operates independently but maintains affiliation with a given chain. To stay within the chain, the hotel must meet certain minimum criteria
    Vacation Ownership: This also known as timeshare that give you certain leisure vacation when you sign up for a timeshare.

    Reply
  19. Daniella Martinez

    Daniella Martinez
    HMGT 1101
    Prof. Duchamp
    Chapter 3

    In Chapter three, the text focuses on the importance of evaluating guest and employee safety as well as a guest satisfaction through hotel administration. It is also important to recognize the responsibilities of employers to know where exactly you’d need to go if you need help to gain tickets for a baseball game or to know that the uniformed staff are the ones in charge of helping take your luggage, or anything related to guest services. Human resources are run by the the General manager as well as the executive committee who puts those who are capable to operate the job. Chapter three also describes the different ways a guest can make reservations as well as classifying the type of guest they are. There are different softwares like the ASP, PMS, GDS.. to distinguish and enable profitability and guest satisfaction.

    1) Revenue centers: Hotels consist of revenue centers as the production of sales and services.
    2) Executive Committee: The executive committee at the Garden Inn Hotel are always trying to improve ways to satisfy the guest including sales and marketing plans and renovating.
    3) Rooms Division: All hotels should make sure that their rooms division manager has an effective leadership and operational plan for all departments to run a safe and vigilant performance.
    4) Yield Management: In order to confirm a room purchase with great features, Sarah decided to secure a room long before she actually left for vacation for a better price than if she purchased the room three days before she left.
    5) Room rates: Room rates tend to go up when special events appear near town.
    6) PMS: old fashioned paper-based methods are long gone after the PMS software made it a lot easier to collect data related to guest details.
    7) City Ledger: Darion was able to make a payment through the city ledger which would allow his payment be sent to the hotel since he had established credit with that hotel.
    8) Night Auditor: The night auditor reported a mistake that was done for a guest’s charge when he compared the posted charges.
    9) ROP: The rooms occupancy percentage is determined through the number of rooms by the numbers of room available.
    10) Daily Report: The Daily report establishes how many rooms are available for sale and how many are not.
    11) Revenue Management: The Tipton hotel decided to raise the room rates because they realized that the majority of guests wanted a room with a beach view.
    12) REVPar: The revenue per available room is found by dividing the total revenue by the rooms that are available.
    13) Call Accounting System: Since Jeremy made an incredible amount of phone calls, the CAS decided to raise his phone charge.
    14) GDS: Lina was traveling to California but forgot that she hadn’t made a reservation beforehand so she made one using the GDS.
    15) CRS: All the database Lina placed in the GDS was stored in the CRS.
    16) CRO: The database from the CRS is then transferred to the CRO.
    17) ASP: George used an ASP website which made it a lot easier for him to book than it was for Sam who booked three months later at a higher percentage.
    18) Guaranteed reservations: Leyla called the Garden Inn hotel to assure her reservation.
    19) Confirmed reservation: Joyann made a reservation a while back who then received a confirmation slip that obtained her type of room date of arrival and departure and any type of special request.
    20) Concierge: Jailene was getting married in two days and her dress was damaged with oil stains. thankfully, the concierge was able to contact a wedding stylist right before the wedding to provide her with a new dress.
    21)Productivity: The housekeeper’s productivity was measured by the person-hours per occupied room.
    22)OSHA: In order for a hotel to run smoothly, it must be run through certain health and safety inspections.
    23) Cost centers: The cost center contacted the general manager to go over an administration process.
    24) Employee Right to Know: Employees must be aware of certain chemicals they deal in order to avoid any dangerous accidents.
    25) Uniformed Staff: For great first impressions, hotels usually have a uniformed staff to greet and help the guest with the luggage.
    26) Catastrophe Plans: Evaluation throughout the hotel is needed to ensure guest and employee safety and to also minimize costs from disasters.
    27) ADR: The average daily rate is estimated by the division of the total revenue by rooms sold.

    Reply
  20. Erick T

    Chapter 3 Summary:
    This chapter begins by explaining the main roles and departments of certain people and structures of the hotel business. The chapter describes the organization within the hotel. This is shown on page 97. There are a lot of duties in the different departments and it seems like in order for a hotel to survive, there must be an incredible amount of organization. The chapter goes on to describe the different systems that are used with handling the guests, and how revenue is calculated. Pages 122 and 123 show just how many items a room can have, and how every item is accounted for.

    Examples:
    1. Application service provider: delivers a complete booking system tied to the hotels inventory in real time via the internet. my example: Like a restaurant POS, or maybe just a spreadsheet to lists the available rooms booked or free.
    2. average daily rate:one of the key operating ratios that indicates the level of a hotels performance. the ADR is calculated by dividing the dollar sales by the number of rooms rented. My example: Just shows the numbers involved with how well the hotel is doing.
    3. call accounting systems:a system that tracks guest room phone charges. My example: Can be like a credit card; call now, pay later.
    4. catastrophe plans:a plan to maximize guest and property safety in the even of a disaster. My example; An emergency plan the hotel comes up with to help ensure the guests are safe.
    5. central reservation office: a central office if a lodging company, where the reservations are processed. My example: The website of a hotel, where one can book a room.
    6. central reservation system:A reservation system that is commonly used in large franchises to connect their reservation systems with one another enables guests to call one phone number to reserve a room at any of the chain properties. My examples: A system that ties the data of all websites used to book a room.
    7. city ledger:A client whos company has established credit with a particular hotel. Charges are posted to the city ledger and accounts are sent once or twice monthly. My example:
    8. concierge: a uniformed employee of a hotel who works at a desk in the lobby or on special concierge floors and answers questions, solves problems, and performs the services of a private secretary for the hotels guests. My example: A person that is like a supervisor, helps out where ever the person is needed.
    9. confirmed reservations:a reservation made by a guest that is confirmed by the hotel for the dates they plan to stay. My example: Like confirming a doctors appointment.
    10. cost centers:centers that cost money to operate and not bring in revenue. My example:
    11. daily reports:A report prepared each day to provide essential performance information for a particular property to its management. my example: A log prepared at the end of a shift to indicate how well business is doing.
    12. employee right to know: per us senate bill 198, information about chemicals must be made available to all employees. My example: A person has the right to understand what he/she is working with and understand handling procedures.
    13. executive committee: a committee of hotel executives from each of the major departments within the hotel. My example; Can be related to the united nations, where there is a representative from each country to discuss problems.
    14. global distribution systems:a system that can distribute the product or service globally. My example: Marketing sites such as Expedia.com
    15. guaranteed reservations:if rooms are available on a guest demand, the hotel guarantees the guests rooms on those days. My example: Much like booking a doctors appointment, where the office books them wherever there is space.
    16. occupational safety and health administration: oversees and ensures workers safety.
    17. productivity: the effectiveness of product effort. Example: An employee preparing for their shift by stocking up, vs an employee that doesnt stock up and unprepared.
    18. property management systems:a computerized system that integrates all systems used by a lodging property, such as reservations, front desk, housekeeping, food and beverage control, and accounting.
    19. revenue management:the management of revenue. My example: The CFO of a company takes care of the finances of the company.
    20. revenue centers:centers that produce revenue.
    21. revenue per available room:total rooms revenue for period divided by total rooms available during a period.
    22. room occupancy percentage: the number of a rooms occupied divided by rooms available; a key operating ratio for hotels. My example: a simple formula that can mean how well a hotel is doing, and provides some insight for how much revenue is being generated.
    23. room rates:the various rates charged for hotel rooms. My example: the different prices a room can go for.
    24. rooms division: the departments that make up room division.
    25. uninformed staff:front of house staff. My example: In the restaurant business, the server, runner, manager.
    26. yeild managements: the practice of analyzing past reservation patterns, room rates, cancellations and no shows in an attempt to maximize profits and occupancy rates and to set the most competitive rooms rates. My example: Like a vehicle carfax report.

    Reply
  21. Joe

    Johandry veras
    HMGT 1101
    Prof. Duchamp
    Chapter 3
    In chapter 3, is all about how the hotels are divided and how each division is managed according tho it function. Also the chapter tells you who represent the hotel (which is the General Manager) and what the Genaral Manager is responsable for. In this chapter express you what the Front Desk is responsable for. Reading through the chater there are alot of important words that i have learned, here I will provide them with examples:
    1-Application Service Provider (ASP): Once we open the hotel, we have to have an Application Service Provider, so when guests are booking hotels, they can also check us out and see our rooms available.
    2-Average Daily Rate (ADR): Every month we have to calculate the Average Daily Rate in our hotel, so we can see how the revenue is growing.
    3-Call Accounting System (CAS): Maria is making a lot of call, for sure this month we will have a raise from the CAS.
    4-Catastrophe Plans: We have to evaluate the disasters from the hotel and also the emplyees and guests’ safety.
    5-Central Reservation Office (CRO): This week the CRO have been busy with call from all over the world, we will have an increase on sales for this weekend.
    6-Central Reservation System (CRS): We have to make sure that all the information of the available rooms and occupied rooms are going to the CRS because we do not want to have an issue when guests come in to a check-in.
    7-City Ledger: Jose when you get a chance, please check in the CL if this non-guest is in that list, so we can see the credit.
    8-Concierge: Mario is the concierge for this late night shift, so when the guest Jose Alberto comes in tonigh, Mario will be helping him to come in.
    9-Confirmed Reservations: Today we have already five Confirmed Reservations for this weekend, so with that being said we will have a busy weekend.
    10-Cost Centers: When the cost senter need to price something, he calls the GM.
    11-Daily Report: Everyday the RDM gives to the GM a Daily Report of the departments that he is on charge of.
    13-Employee Right to Know: The Housekeepings of the hotel have the right to know the certain things they are using to clean so they can be aware and savety in case they are allergic to some of them.
    14-Executive Committee: Since Jaimes is the GM, he is who does the major desicions using the input from the EC.
    15-Global Distribution System (GDS): When someone is trying to reserve a room from one continent to the other, that system used to find that room is called: GDS.
    16-Guaranteed Reservation: It is a reservation that is being charged.
    17-Night Auditor: Jose is the Night Auditor so tonight he will be checking the rooms revenue and charges mistakes, so by 1:00AM he will be going over it.
    18-Ocupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA): Jose works in the area of OSHA so he ensure safe and healthfull working conditions.
    19-Productivity: Since today is the last day of the month, we have to check the hotel productivity of the month.
    20-Property Manager System (PMS): My hotel has a PMS to maintain balanced the guest folio.
    21-Revenue Management: Every month we check the revenue to ensure we are not loosing money or at least we are checking how the revenue is increasing or decreasing.
    22-Revenue Centers: In the revenue Center we ensure to create sales and deals to make the guest come back and get more guests to the hotel.
    23-Revenue Per Available Room: It is the calculation to find out how much revenue a hotel is earning from an specific room.
    24-Room Occupancy Persentage: This is the calculation that must be made to check how many rooms are occupied in a persentage rate.
    25-Room Rates: It is basically the price of an available room. For example, when there are important events in YNC the Room rates goes up because of the demand.
    26-Room Devision: Maria is on charge of the Room Devision, she has to make sure everything is okay in all the departments that consist in here.
    27-Uniformed Staff: Every hotel has a different color of uniform for their staff.
    28-Yield Management: When I want to go on vacation, I like to get a room with dood features, so I reserve my room with ahead of time.

    Reply
  22. Mariama Bah

    Mariama Bah
    Professor Damien Duchamp
    HMGT 1101
    October 12,2015

    Chapter Summary

    Chapter Three Focuses on the way the hotel is managed and how it’s managed with different factor and different title’s such as the General Manager who is in charge of the hotel as a whole and has people report to him or her, and Divisions Manager who is in charge of the different divisions within the hotel. It tells us each role and how they play into the hotel such as the concierge, the housekeeper, the night auditor and etc. The Chapter then goes on to explain the different ways a customer can make a reservation and the type of systems hotel use to receive and confirm reservations. We also learn in this chapter how to make reports and how to make prices for the hotel such as room rates would vary due to view, size, occupancy and etc.

    Key Words and Concepts

    1. Application service provider (ASP): Maria used an ASP website to book her next family vacation in order to get a better deal.

    2. Average daily rate (ADR): To find the Average Daily Rate you have to divide the amount made the whole day by the number of rooms that were rented out to the guest

    3. Call accounting systems (CAS): While Michael was checking he noticed there were phone charges on his bill that he didn’t make, after going over the bill with the Hotel Concierge they realized the CAS made a technical error and they fixed the problem for him.

    4, Catastrophe plan: In case of a fire the restaurant made a catastrophe plan in order to get the guest and employees out quickly and safely.

    5. Central reservation office: The reservation made for the hotel are processed through the central reservation office.

    6. Central Reservation System: Marriott uses a Central Reservation System in order for guest to use the same number to book a room in any location instead of having to call each hotel.

    7. City Ledger: Since Bill’s company had an established credit with the Stay Inn Hotel in Miami due to business he sent his payments to the city ledger which then sent it the hotel.

    8. Concierge: Upon entering the hotel Israel had tons of questions about the hotel so he found the concierge who was able to answer all his hotel related questions.

    9. Confirmed Reservation: After booking online for a hotel room, Aaron received an email with his confirmed reservation.

    10. Cost Centers: Some hotels don’t want cost centers because they do not bring in revenue.

    11. Daily Report: The Daily report allows the hotel to know how many rooms can be booked for the day to how many people are scheduled to check out, check in and etc.

    12. Employee Right To Know: The Employees must know about the chemicals use and safety.

    13. Executive Committee: The Executive Committee plays a major role in the Hotel they are separated into departments to make the hotel run smooth and efficiently.

    14. Global Distribution System (GDS): While on a road trip Tyrese and his family decided to book a hotel through the GDS system in order for them to get some rest.

    15. Guaranteed Reservation: Daniel called the hotel before landing to guarantee his hotel room since his flight was going to be delayed

    16. Night auditor: Being the night auditor Mark had to verify all account balances were accurate and adjust accordingly.

    17. Occupational safety and Health Administration (OHSA): OSHA has to make sure that the hotel is safe for both the employees and the guest.

    18. Productivity: The Night Auditor productivity was measured by how many accounts were settled.

    19. Property Management System: The PMS is used for many parts of the hotel such as front desk and housekeeping.

    20. Revenue Centers: The hotel manager suggested that they should add a revenue center in order to bring in more money and maximize profit since business was on the slow side as of lately.

    21. Revenue Management: The Revenue of Management decided to raise room rates depending on which view the customer was receiving.

    22. Revenue for available room: In order to receive the REVPar you divide the total revenue by the total rooms available.

    23. Room Division: The Room division manager failed to manage housekeeping properly so if affected the profit for a while because they were behind,

    24. Room Occupancy Percentage (ROP): To find the ROP you need to divide the rooms occupied by the room available.

    25. Room Rate: There are a lot of factors that play into the Room Rate such as the amount of beds, to the view, the amount of people and etc.

    26. Uniform Staff: Having a uniform staff makes it easier for the guest to identify the staff and makes the hotel more presentable.

    27. Yield Management: By using the practice of yield management the concierge was able to accommodate the Brown family to their tailored needs throughout there stay.

    Reply
  23. London

    Chapter 3: Summary – Rooms Division Operations (By: Paulette Powell)

    “Room Division Operations,” in brief, reveals the intricacies of the hotels operations. From the titles and roles of executive/upper management. To the itemized and detailed records of what each division entails, such as house-keeping, concierge, and hotel security/loss prevention. Another process vital to hotel operations, would be keeping abreast of their financial/revenue records. Calculating the average daily rate, percentage rates estimated on the occupancy and room availability, are just some of the crucial components needed to keep the hotel operating smoothly.

    1. Application Service Provider (ASP): Through online software, I have the ability to provide the hotel with its complete booking system, in real time.

    2. Average Daily Rate (ADR): To determine the “average daily rate,” you would have to take the total amount ($) for the rooms and divide it by the number of rooms actually sold ADR – (ex: $80,000.00 / 600 (rooms) = $133.33.

    3. Call Accounting System (CAS): When any guest chooses to use the guest phone in their room, the hotel keeps track of the usage/costs per call via the “call accounting system.”

    4. Catastrophe Plan: In the event of a disaster, and in order to protect the guest, staff and property, the “catastrophe plan” in place evaluate things such as, insurance policies, and the hotels physical structure.

    5. Central Reservation Office (CRO): The hub, where reservation processing occurs.

    6. Central Reservation Systems (CRS): Where the system used, provides the guest with the best possible rates available, when booking their stay.

    7. City Ledger: Is a special account, that’s provided to an organization that has reputable credit with the hotel, therefore allowing the company to be billed during a certain period to time.

    8. Concierge: Will assist a guest with a variety of services, so that they can cater to the guest’s exact needs, from the ordinary to the eccentric.

    9. Confirmed Reservations: After the initial booking, and for reassurance, many guests call back to confirm that their reservations are still in place.

    10. Cost Centers: A place that cost money to operate, but unfortunately does not bring in any revenue.

    11. Daily Report: A daily recurring, statistical record(s), pertinent in monitoring the performance of key areas as, room occupancy, occupancy percentage, and the average daily rate.

    12. Employee Right to Know: The U.S Senate Bill 198, was put in place to protect employees around the usage, storage and handling of hazardous chemicals. Safety is primary and all employees must be made aware.

    13. Executive Committee: All major decisions for the hotel are made through a panel of the members of upper management, from each division. This group is known as the, “Executive Committee.”

    14. Global Distribution Systems (GDS): The Airline Industry was the first to use the “global distribution system,” which is used as an electronic market for, attraction bookings, hotels, car rentals and more.

    15. Guaranteed Reservations: Is a sure fire way for both the guest and the hotel to be able to either, confirm that the guest reservation is secure (whether their on-time or a notified late arrival) or if upon a “non-cancellation condition” the hotel (based on hotel reservation policy) will be entitled to charge the reserved room to the guests credit card.

    16. Night Auditor: There is an arduous process in place. Activities begin during off peak hours. For the night auditor, that would be around, 1:00am when things have slowed down. This allows the auditor, to handle things such as, run reconciliation reports, to determine if any errors exists. Processing back-up reports, in case of a systems error etc…

    17. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA): This organizations purpose is to adhere to job safety and health regulations, to ensure safe work conditions, conduct compliance inspections, and issue citations if standards have not been met.

    18. Productivity: In each role performed by each member of staff, there is a goal to be met. Your performance whether it is good or poor will determine what level of productivity you provided.

    19. Property Management Systems (PMS): There are multiple computerized systems used within the running operations of a hotel. The “property management systems,” is the main system in which collectively gathers the data from all of the other systems.

    20. Revenue Management: The purpose of “revenue management,” is to increase profitability, through being able to maximize the usage of every room venue at the hotel.

    21. Revenue Centers: Unlike the “cost centers,” which do not produce revenue, as it says in its name, the revenue center produces revenue, through the thousands of the products and services which are sold every day.

    22. Revenue Per Available Room (REV PAR): Is a method used to do a comparison analysis against the hotels competitors. To use this system, you calculate by dividing room revenue by the number of rooms available.

    23. Room Occupancy Percentage (ROP): Is a key operation for hotels. These calculations are used to determine the hotels performance by the number of rooms occupied divided by the number of rooms available.

    24. Room Rates: All hotels provide rooms at different sizes/levels, therefore “room rates” are necessary to gauge appropriate price rates.

    25. Rooms Division: Would include areas such as, concierge, house-keeping, guest services, front office, and reservations.

    26. Uniformed Staff: Are headed by, the Guest Services Department, and would consist of the door attendants, bell persons and sometimes the concierge.

    27. Yield Management: is a system that assists in maximizing profit, through past analysis of room rates, reservations patterns, cancellations, and no-shows.

    Reply
  24. Daniella Martinez

    Daniella Martinez
    HMGT 1101
    Prof. Duchamp
    10/17/15
    Chapter 4 Summary

    In this chapter of the textbook, we get to realize the importance and order that comes about in the kitchen. There are different aspects and head chefs involved to lead and maintain a structured department. It is very crucial to have a close eye on inventory, forecasting and operating ratios to come close to a result. It is also very important when dealing with alcohol. No one wants to remain liable for anything that happens on their premises. Keeping up with the guests needs is an ideal and actually a mandatory requirement as well as knowing how to keep them happy.

    1) Kitchen Manager: The kitchen manager at the Hilton hotel has to make sure to direct the food and beverage staff for effective operation.
    2) The executive chef: Achieving financial results and proper control of kitchen operations falls under the responsibility of an executive chef.
    3) Perpetual Inventories: In order to calculate the cost of food per outlet, perpetual inventories help maintain control of those costs.
    4) Contribution Margin: The contribution method determines the difference between the cost of preparing the foods as well as the selling price.
    5) Labor costs %: Joan has to make sure that the amount of preparing the foods from scratch as well as those that aren’t, determine the right labor cost percentage.
    6) Food sales %: To find out the food sales percentage, Leila has realize the labor cost over the food sales to determine the food sales percentage.
    7) Sous chef: Mario went on a vacation and had left Rick, the sous chef in charge of all inquiries.
    8) Chef tournant: Sheyla needs a break here and there and that’s why the chef tournant takes over through Sheyla’s and other stations.
    9) Station chefs: There are different types of chefs and every station station has a particular chef who specializes in that area.
    10) Brigade: The brigade consists of all the different types of station chefs.
    11) Capture Rate: The capture rate for the cafe lets us know that we might expect a minimum of 30 guests.
    12) Responsible Alcoholic Beverage Service: Jake takes great caution of how his bartenders serve adults and makes sure that he/she won’t be liable for any accidents around the premises.
    13) Pilfering: Jenna, the head chef of desserts must resist from pilfering to reduce shortage of items.
    14) shoppers: Jane played a shopper who goes undercover to check who the business is running.
    15) Chief Steward: Keyla, the chief steward must make sure that the back of the house always remains clean as well as maintaining strict inventory.
    16) DOC: The DOC of Liena’s Cafe makes sure everything runs accordingly to the guests expectations.
    17) Banquet: There are halls to banquet up to 3,000 guests
    18) Catering: For Marta’s wedding , we had people cater at the Astoria manner.
    19) CSM; The Catering Sales Manager must sell the lucrative functions to satisfy the guests as well as making profit.
    20) Theater-Style room seating: Amanda had to make sure that the entertainment space wouldn’t take up too much room capacity so that it wouldn’t decrease seating capacity.
    21) Classroom-style seating: The hotel has a Classroom-style seating to help groups who reserve for meeting have enough space to take notes.
    22) Horseshoe-style room seating; Jane who teaches through a projector to train the delegates usually use a horseshoe-style room seating.
    23) Dinner-style room seating: For large parties, variations of dinner-style room seating are preferred.
    24)CEO: Tia who is the CEO of the hotel’s restaurant was responsible to inform the personnel about essential information.
    25) Catering coordinator: Jeyla who is the catering coordinator must manage the function diary to correctly prepare numerous details.
    26) CSM: The catering services manager responsibility is to deliver higher-than-expected services to the guests.
    27) Room Service: Tyrone ordered room service who is expected to receive the same dining experience in his room.
    28) Contribution Margin: In order to determine the profitability of individual products, the contribution margin will provide the calculation/concept.
    29) Restaurant Manager: The manger of a restaurant must keep track of all inventory as well as how the staff functions.
    30) Pour/Cost percentage: To determine the pour cost percentage, dividing the inventory by the actual sales done for that month will allow a percentage estimate.

    Reply
  25. Kunle Kernizan

    HMGT 1101
    Kunle Kernizan
    NYT summary Indonesa.
    In Indonesia, Many Islands and Many Faces
    From Papua to Bali, this sprawling country offers beauty, intimacy and great deals for travelers.

    This article describes Kugel’s trip to four tourist areas of Indonesia. He first describes his trip Padang Sumatra seeing the celebration of Ramadan among the Muslim people living there. He also describes the foods such as Beef Rendang dendung and kankung at his driver’s family home. He also describes the traditions of Ramadan such as the five absolutions and eating before sun rise to be fed for the fast during the day.
    After that Kugel visits Sulawesi and the Toraja people. A funeral was being held and he describes a water buffalo about to be sacrificed escaping. He also describes the local architecture of the local people.
    Later he travels to a village in central Irian Jaya. He also talks about the way that Western tourists along with previously mentioned Indonesian settlers have been travelling to Irian Jaya so they are used to outsiders. He also mentions how the population has totally changed since colonization, people there dressed in t-shirts and shorts and the only person dressed in the traditional penis gourd of the area. He also eats baked sweet potatoes (the staple of all New Guinea) near a honai (hovel).
    Finally he travels to Bali. He goes to a town called Kemenuh and a nearby town to see the religious ritual known as Galungan, which is a celebration of their ancestor’s spirits.
    This article describes how people in four different parts of Indonesia. The theme that seems to go through every one of these towns is that the Indonesians are very welcoming to foreigners and that the country has many things to offer for tourists.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/23/travel/bali-indonesia-budget-travel.html?ribbon-ad-idx=6&rref=collection/column/frugal-traveler

    Reply
  26. Victoria A. Gaston

    Victoria Gaston
    Professor Damien Duchamp
    HMGT1101

    “Chapter Summary”

    Chapter three focuses on how hotels are managed and the different management titles within the hotels, such as the General Manager who is in charge of running the entire hotel, as well as attracting business and build relationships with the guests and the employees. There is also an executive committee that help manage the different departments within the hotel, that report back to GM the details of what’s going on within their departments; departments such as, food and beverage, marketing, sales, and human resources. The chapter also explains all of the supporting roles that are held in a hotel, like the front office, reservations, housekeeping, concierge, guest services, security, and communications. Chapter three goes on to talk about the different systems that are operated to help the hotels work efficiently, and keep the satisfactory of guest up to par.

    1. Application Service Provider (ASP): My example- Ana used an ASP booking site to get a good deal on her next vacation.
    2. Average Daily Rate (ADR): My example- In order to determine the average daily rate, you need to divide the total room revenues by the number of rooms that are sold. (10,000 room revenues/ 710 rooms sold = $14.1 ADR)
    3. Call Accounting Systems (CAS): My example- After using the hotels room telephone, John wanted to check in with the front desk to see what his charges would be for the phone calls he made.
    4. Catastrophe Plans: My example- If there is a sudden emergency, there is a set “catastrophe plan” in place to help get all guest and staff out immediately and safely, as well as insurance for any possible damages that may occur from the disaster.
    5. Central Reservation Office (CRO): My example- Main office where all reservations are processed.
    6. Central Reservation System (CRS): My example- A system that allows guests to make reservations using one phone number of a hotel franchise to reserve their room.
    7. City Ledger: My example- Tiffany’s company has an established credit with the Hampton Inn in New York; due to business she had sent all her payments to the city ledger, which then sent it to the hotel.
    8. Concierge: My example- Stephanie arrived at her hotel and wanted information on the few venues within the Standard Hotel, so she requested to speak with a concierge who was able to give her some all the names of the venues and their daily schedules, etc.
    9. Confirmed Reservations: My example- Like confirming any important appointments, a hotel has to confirm the reservation that a guest has made for their stay.
    10. Cost Centers: My example- Most hotels do not have cost centers due to the fact that, that it does not bring in revenue.
    11. Daily Report: My example- Ashlee reviews the daily report that shows her how many rooms can be booked for the day and the number of people that are scheduled to check in and out.
    12. Employee Right to Know: My example- The employees must know the “catastrophe plan” in case of an emergencies.
    13. Executive Committee: My example- Directors of the major departments in a hotel that help run it efficiently.
    14. Global Distribution Systems (GDS): My example- Sam needed to find a place for a short stay after his long bus ride to a small town, so he uses a GDS site to find a suitable place for him.
    15. Guaranteed Reservations: My example- Dan was helping a walk-in guest check in, since there were rooms available at the moment he was able to guarantee the guest a room at the hotel.
    16. Night Auditor: My example- Smith is the night auditor at his hotel, so he will be reviewing the rooms revenue and making sure all account balances are correct and adjusted as according.
    17. Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA): My example- Tim is part of the OSHA, his job is to make sure that the hotel is safe for both guest and employees.
    18. Productivity: My example- As a general manager, you would need to check the productivity of the entire hotel, including the productivity within the other departments in the hotel ran by the executive committee and etc.
    19. Property Management Systems (PMS): My example- The PMS is the main system that collects all data from the other operated systems within the hotel.
    20. Revenue Management: My example- Revenue management purpose is for the organization of increasing the profit within a hotel; being able to bring up the max of usage of rooms in the hotel.
    21. Revenue Centers: My example- The general manager decided that it would be a good idea to bring in revenue centers to bring In more money and the increase of profit at the hotel.
    22. Revenue Per Available Room (REV PAR): My example- A formula used to determine how much revenue is earned from a room at a hotel.
    23. Room Occupancy Percentage (ROP): My example- To find the ROP you need to divide the rooms occupied, by the rooms available.
    24. Room Rates: My example- There are room rates due to the different types of rooms hotels offer.
    25. Room Division: My example- Departments in the hotel that include, front office, reservations, housekeeping, concierge, guest services, and communications.
    26. Uniformed Staff: My example- Working at the Marriott there is a specific uniform staff members must wear that that it could be easier to identify who works there and who doesn’t work there.
    27. Yield Management: My example- the system that help in maximizing profit, through past analysis of room rates, reservations patterns, cancellations, and no-shows.

    Reply
  27. Arian Florez

    Arian Florez
    HMGT 1101
    Chapter 4 Summary

    Chapter 4 discusses all the various aspects of food and beverage operations. It broke down the job requirements and the skill sets required to operate a restaurant, bar, hotel restaurant, etc. They take you through the kinds of problems that might come up on an average day working in the hotels. They talked about catering and how various departments work to improve the guest service, while also producing profit or the restaurant or the hotel itself. Room service is also discussed in how the trend of room service has developed and how operations balance profiting from room service with simply providing a wonderful guest experience.

    Banquet: Basically a fancy dinner setup, think large banquet halls with fancy silverware.

    Banquet Event Order: Example: Blueprints to how to setup the event including special requests, color schemes, menu planning, how many people will attend, identifying VIPs of the event.

    Brigade: A team of cooks each performing a special task. i.e. prep cook, soup cook, sous chef, pastry chef, head chef.

    Capture Rate: Number of guests you can “trap” in hotel dining or hotel bars. Not guests that choose to dine elsewhere.

    Catering: A branch within the food and beverage division that focuses on specific food and beverage events that the hotel booked through their sales department.

    Catering Coordinator: That group of 400 people coming into the hotel for their annual company dinner, yeah that’s this persons headache. Gotta make sure everything is setup the way the client asked.

    Catering Event Order: Basically the same as a BEO. The blueprints as to how menus need to be setup, chair placement, floral arrangements, etc.

    Catering Services Manager: Head of the catering services department for the hotel, restaurant.

    Chef Tournant: The chef that jumps onto other stations to relieve other cooks. Someone has to drop a log, I got your station covered. Sliced your finger open? I got you covered too.

    Chief Steward: The unspoken hero, makes sure cleaning gets done, glasses get shined, floors are swept, keep the clean appearance that people expect.

    Classroom-style seating: Exactly how it sounds, all chairs facing the front towards a projector, podium, alter, etc. There may be tables setup as well so people can take notes.

    Contribution Margin: Selling price – Food Cost= Profitability. Crucial for menu planning.

    Dinner-Style Seating: Usually round table to seat around 8 to 10 people, or boardroom-style tables for smaller parties.

    Director of Catering: Responsible for selling and servicing, catering, banquets, meetings, etc. Basically GM for special events.

    Director of Food and Beverage: Responsible for kitchens, catering, restaurants, bars, and room service. The more the hotel offers in terms of food, the more grey hair on their head.

    Executive Chef: The head of the kitchen. Usually manages tasks of other chefs rather than do cooking. Likely tastes foods to ensure quality and proper taste.

    Food Cost Percentage: Ratio of Cost of food divided by the amount of Food sales

    Food Sales Percentage: The percentage of revenue generated through sale of food or drinks.

    Horseshoe-style room seating: Used for a meeting or convention where people are interacting with the speaker. Think a business meeting where the CEO is talking to the chairmen of the company.

    Kitchen Manager: The person in charge of managing the kitchen department. May be the head chef or could be someone entirely different.

    Labor Cost Percentage: Important to stay on top of in order to ensure profitability. Percentage of revenue or sales that labor takes up.

    Perpetual Inventory: A running inventory that updates itself. Probably electronic or an app in today’s hotels.

    Pilferage: Stealing that occurs from employees or guests. If you work in a kitchen, and you can’t help but munch on bacon all day long, that’s pilferage. If you take the hotel towels home with you, you’re just as guilty.

    Pour/Cost Percentage: Basically the same as food cost percentage, just as it pertains to drinks. So cost control in a bar or with drinks at a restaurant.

    Responsible Alcoholic Beverage Service: Basically limiting an establishments liability. Not selling alcohol to minors. Not continuing to sell drinks to the belligerently drunk guy that swears he’s fine to drive.

    Restaurant Manager: Just as it sounds, this person manages and operates the restaurant.

    Room Service: Just pick up your hotel phone and most of your ridiculous requests can be met and delivered to your room. I.e. extra soap, pillows, breakfast, cleaning.

    Shopper: Like a mystery shopper, they appear as normal customers but ensure the establishment operates to the standard set by management. Helps prevent shady business from employees.

    Sous Chef: Supervises food production and reports to head chef. Second in command in the kitchen.

    Station Chef: A chef in charge of a station. Prep cook? These veggies are your duty. Get to chopping!

    Theater-style Room Seating: Similar to classroom seating, plenty of chairs facing a stage, a projector, etc depending on the event in question.

    Reply
  28. Joe

    Johandry Veras
    Perspectives in Hospitality Management Prof. Damien Duchamp
    October 27, 2015
    Chapter 4
    Vocabulary:
    1 Banquet­ This saturday we will have a Banquet in this restaurant for a corporation meeting, so we have to have enough chairs to seat all our guests and that way they all can eat together.
    2 Banquet event order (BEO)­ Juan the event is already this saturday, please make sure we are not missing anything from the list the guest requested.
    3 Brigade­ Weekends we have a big Brigade since it is busy in here, we need chefs for every type of food.
    4 Capture rate­ We are having an awesome week, we have more guests than what we were forecasting for this week.
    5 Catering­ I have an amazing catering team, they do their best to provide a great service to our guest in every event.
    6 Catering coordinator­ Jessica please before we sign this contract, read it and tell me if it is right under our policy.
    7 Catering event order (CEO)­ Julio since you are the CEO i will need you to come with me to this reunion with these couple, they want to see the theater and I would like you to take tone of what they want and need.
    8 Catering Service Manager (CSM)­ Richard you already know that this coming up event is a challenge for us because this is an event that we will be handling with owners of hotel, people who works for customer service and so on; so make sure our team is ready to do a great service. 9 Chef Tournant­ We have to hide a Chef Tournant, this kitchen is growing and we need someone to rotates through the various stations.
    10 Chief Steward­ I think mario is doing an amazing job, he does his job with a passion and very responsible. Mario makes sure the backstage of the house is clean, he maintain a good inventory and good maintenance of the dish washes.
    11 Classroom­style seating­ We have to keep the room with the Classroom­style seating because tomorrow we will have a trip from a school where we will be teaching them how the hotel industry works.
    12 Contribution Margin­ Since we already have the recipe for this menu, now we have to calculate the contribution margin so we can find out how much we will be earning moneywise from this dish.
    13 Dinner­style room seating­ We will have celebrating a 16 birthday next week and the want the tables with the Dinner­style room seating.
    14 Director of Catering (DOC)­ When I become the Director of Catering, I will make sure to exceed the guests’ expectations. Also create events through companies and industry so we can bring much more revenue to the hotel.
    15 Director of Food and Beverage­ Since Marie will be the new GM of this Hotel, I will be reporting her how we doing in the restaurants, bars, minibars, room­service, etc.
    16 Executive Chef­ Jose is the Executive Chef of Marriott Hotel, he is under charge of everything back in the kitchen.
    17 Food Cost Percentage­ It is the formula to calculate the total cost percentage in food.
    18 Food Sales Percentage­ In this restaurant I want to make sure we have at least a 30% food sales percentage, we can do this by doing add ons to orders, like adding drinks, cookies, etc.
    19 Horseshoe­style Room Seating­ For the meeting next week, my boss requested a Horseshoe­style room seating.
    20 Kitchen Manager­ Mario is the Kitchen Manager, his role to manage the food production, and mke it efficient.
    21 Labor Cost Percentage­ Is a formula to calculate the labor cost of an employee.
    22 Perpetual Inventory­ When we check the Perpetual Inventory, we can see our recents sales and purchases.
    23 Pilferage­ We have cameras in the bar to ensure employees do not pilferage the bar.
    24 Pour/Cost Percentage­ I will check next week the Pour/Cost Percentage, I am expecting to get a 24 percentage.
    25 Responsable Alcoholic Beverage Service­ Once we open the bar, all the servers will be tested with a secret under age person to make sure they do not give alcoholic beverage to any customer. 26 Restaurant Manager­ The Restaurant Manager from Hard Rock Cafe is doing a great job, that restaurant in Times Square is always full of great employees, and they advertise very well the restaurant through selling nice souvenirs from its restaurant.
    27 Room Service­ In every room of the hotel, we have an special room service telephone number, to ensure that every guest get whatever they need extra.
    28 Shopper­ I love being a Shopper in restaurant to see how the employees are operating. 29 Sous Chef­ The Sous Chef is like an assistant of the executive chef.
    30 Station Chef­ We have this weekend a lot of task, it will be busy. so we will have the Station Chef in the evening.
    31 T​heater­style room seating­ For this presentation of the new Iphone 7, we will have a Theater­style room seating.

    Reply
  29. London

    Prof D. Duchamp: HMGT 1101

    By Paulette Powell

    Chapter 4 – Food & Beverage Operations (Summary)

    Understanding the day to day operations of the food and beverage department, including the duties and responsibilities of the team members involved. Identifying the chain of command, starting from the Director of food & beverage, all the way to the Servers.

    1. Banquet:
    All restaurants have banquet style dining, which sets up multiple groups of people, dining in one main area.

    2. Banquet Event Order (BEO) / Catering Event Order (CEO):
    Banquet Event Order, is also known as the “Catering Event Order.” Providing the what, when, where and how, to ensure a successful event for the client, as well as the hotel.

    3. Brigade:
    The kitchen staff, from the Sous to the Pastry Chef’s and all in between, are known as the “brigade.” This name was given to them by the illustrious, Escoffier, pioneer to the hospitality industry.

    4. Capture Rate:
    A method, used by staff to calculate the number of expected guest, for any particular event or function.

    5. Catering:
    Handles all of the food and beverage preparation/services, for any given event, regardless of size.

    6. Catering Coordinator:
    Specifically handles the role of, updating the function diary, as well as managing the office.

    7. Catering Services Manager (CSM):
    Has the arduous task of multitasking. Between scheduling staff, checking last minute details, to gratuity distribution, and more.

    8. Chef Tournant:
    This title follows after the Sous Chef. The Tournant assists when it is necessary to replace or rotate for the station chef heads.

    9. Chief Steward:
    The responsibility of this position is to manage tasks in the “back of the house,” such as, routine inventory checks, maintaining proper hygiene standards, and kitchen equipment function.

    10. Classroom-style Seating:
    Have their tables and chairs, setup just like a classroom setting of tables and chairs situated in rows and columns, preferably for business meetings, in which the classroom seating is better suited for note taking.

    11. Contribution Margin:
    To determine if the day was profitable, the contribution margin is calculated by subtracting the “food cost from the selling price.”

    12. Dinner-style Room Seating:
    Great for board room style events, weddings and small gatherings.

    13. Director of Catering (DOC):
    Another busy role, where the DOC works closely with division manager and the executive chef, ensure that reserved rooms are fully equipped. Events are seamlessly, menus meet the needs of all guests, and that budgets are properly reconciled.

    14. Director of Food & Beverage:
    Although top of the food chain in their division, they still report to the General Manager. They must have the ability to also multitask, and through their leadership effectively & efficiently operate the several departments, while keep costs under control, staff happy and knowledgeable, and trends relevant.

    15. Executive Chef:
    While the Exec Chef reports to the Dir. of Food & Beverage, they’re responsible for appeasing the guest’s palate. Where their individual tastes can find no wrong with your cuisine.

    16. Food Cost Percentage:
    Is calculated by simply dividing the cost of food, by the food sales.

    17. Food Sales Percentage:
    Goes hand in hand with;” Labor Cost Percentage,” because the food sales percentage depends on what the difference is between the, labor cost and the food sales.

    18. Horseshoe-style Room Seating:
    This seating style is preferred by groups who have events, such as, workshops and trainings.

    19. Kitchen Manager:
    Are also known as “Executive Chefs,” and can serve as the food & beverage directors, depending on the size of the hotel or restaurant.

    20. Labor Cost Percentage:
    Based on whether the ingredients purchased are, processed bulk or natural/raw foods, determines the labor cost percentage.

    21. Perpetual Inventory:
    Are food items that are never ending, routine, always used, which allows the kitchen to calculate potential food costs.

    22. Pilferage:
    Theft of services. Staff in the past have been known to steal, by taking small amounts of food or beverages, thinking that such a small amount would not be noticed. Also, underserving or over serving is another issue that is considered as pilfering.

    23. Pour/Cost Percentage:
    To maintain the expenditure of a bar consistent, the pour/cost is calculated by the depleted inventory, and sales over time.

    24. Responsible Alcoholic Beverage Service:
    With proper training and adherence to policy and procedure, the operators are responsible for making sure staff are in compliance.

    25. Restaurant Manager:
    Restaurant managers in a hotel, operate the same way a restaurant manager would in a restaurant. Some of their duties would be hiring, training/development, customer service excellence, setting and maintain high standards, and budgeting.

    26. Room Service:
    A guest can make a request to have services provided to them in their room vs the communal areas of the hotel, such as ordering a meal, to eat in their room vs at the hotels restaurants.

    27. Shopper:
    In the world of retail, shoppers are known as “secret shopper,” where they are under cover and making requests as a regular guest would, so that they can monitor any infractions in process.

    28. Sous Chef:
    Is the next in command to the executive chef, and is responsible for the everyday operations of each kitchen shift.

    29. Station Chef:
    The Station Chefs consist of a, Sauce, Roast, Fish, Pantry, Banquet, Pastry, and Vegetable Chef’s.

    30. Theatre-style Room Seating:
    This style setup is for the event that requires an audiovisual platform, and the use of equipment such as projectors.

    Reply
  30. Mariama Bah

    Mariama Bah
    HMGT 1101
    Professor Damien Duchamp
    October 27,2015

    Chapter Summary

    Chapter 4 focuses on the Food and Beverage Operations and the roles of the food and beverage operations. The Chapter starts off by explaining the responsibilities and tasks of a food beverage directors and everybody under the F&B director, and how there day is from start to finish. It breaks it down even further by focuses on the kitchen, food operations, bars, stewarding department, and the catering department, which also has it key figures in their own operation. The chapter explains how to find certain percentages for food and beverage cost, the style of seating a room can have and etc.

    Key Words and Concepts

    Banquet: The hotel had to arrange several banquet events over the weekend,
    2. Banquet event order (BEO): In order to make sure that the bride and groom request were fulfilled the even planner showed them the BEO that their guest and Hotel personnel were required to follow in order to make their wedding night a success.

    3. Brigade: In a fast paced restaurant a brigade has to be put in place to have a smooth and successful dinner service,

    4. Capture Rate: The hotel was able to determine the capture rate by knowing who the hotel guest were and how long each guest was planning to stay.

    5. Catering: The hotel has great catering services that Melissa and Joe decided to stick with them to help plan their event.

    6. Catering Coordinator: The catering coordinator of the hotel has to read through all the contracts for each event before signing them.

    7. Catering Event Order (CEO): The catering event order is responsible for dictating everything the client wants.

    8. Catering Service Manager (CSM): The CSM is in charge of all thing catering and everybody in the catering field reports to him.

    9. Chef Tournant: While chopping some onions for dinner service Roman cut his finger so the Chef tournant had to cover his station until he received the proper medical attention.

    10. Chief Steward: The chief steward of the restaurant knew an inspection was coming up so he had to make sure everything was clean and up to code.

    11. Classroom- style room seating: The host of the party wanted classroom style seating for her event to use the space effectively.

    12. Contribution margin: Selling price – Food cost = Profitability which is the key operator in menu planning.

    13. Dinner-style room seating: For maria’s 18th birthday she wanted a Dinner style room-seating because she like the idea of round tables.

    14. Director of Catering (DOC): The DOC has to sell the catering services he offers in a way that exceeds the guest expectations.

    15. Director of Food and Beverage: The Director of Food and Beverage has to report to the general manage, he is in charge of running a smooth operation in the kitchen, restaurants including foh and boh, lounges and etc.

    16. Executive Chef: I hope to one day be an executive Chef in a 5 star restaurant.

    17. Food cost percentage: The formula that is used to find out how much food was sold.

    18. Food sales percentage: The food sales percentage is expressed as the labor cost percentage.

    19. Horseshoe-style room seating: For conference that was being held they requested a horseshoe- style seating so that the spokes person can get around to everyone in different parts of the room.

    20. Kitchen Manager: The kitchen manager is in charge of managing the kitchen.

    21. Labor Cost Percentage: The formula for labor cost percentage is labor cost/ net sales then multiplied by 100.

    22. Perpetual Inventory: mark was trying to find a food item but the item wasn’t placed where it normally should be so he checked the perpetual inventory to see if they had some in stock.

    23. Pilferage: While baking for the next catering event Cristina had to refrain from pilferage in order to get the maximum amount of food out.

    24. Pour/cost percentage: the cost percentage relating to beverage control.

    25. Responsible alcoholic beverage service: While working at the Bar Mike made sure to I.D. everyone to make sure he wasn’t serving to a minor this is an act of Responsible alcoholic beverage service

    26. Restaurant Manager: After becoming an executive chef i would love to be a restaurant manager.

    27. Room Service: Room service is a key responsibility in a hotel cleanliness.

    28. Shopper: A mystery shopper went to a bar to observe the bar and the service.

    29. Sous Chef: Having a great sous chef as your second in command is a critical key to a successful restaurant.

    30. Station Chef: Michael was a station chef for the protein during lunch service.

    31. Theater-style room seating: The hotel were arranging the conference room in a theater style seating for a play they were hosting.

    Reply
  31. Zhigang Gao

    Zhigang Gao [Gina] HMGT 1101 draft: summary
    9/28/15 Prof. Damien Duchamp
    Chapter one focuses on service. Service is the most important facet of the hospitality industry. This chapter uses at least 10 pages to explain how important the service is, it also gave Disneyland as an example case to show us services is the key of success, and how to improve the services. Hospitality and tourism industries since the early 1443s began to sprout, from ancient times to the medieval, and then to the French revolution and 19century 20 century. Hospitality and tourism industries had been through a long and tortuous development period. Now it already becomes the largest and fastest-growing industries in the world. For this reason, that industry needed huge amount professional and passionate employees join it. It requires employees or managers know how to set a goal, total quality management has helped improve service to guests by empowering employees to give service that exceeds guest expectations.
    1. Corporate philosophy-textbook def: Embraces the values of the organization, including ethics, morals, fairness, and equality. My example: employees have corporate philosophy make company stronger. For instance, Disneyland’s employees they learn to corporation and share, now this company already becomes the biggest entertainment company on the world.
    2. Empowerment- textbook def: The act of granting authority to employees to make key decisions within their areas of responsibility. My example: The boss gave employees some empowerment can save more time for themselves and customer. For instance, one customer wants a special discount for live in one hotel for 7nights, the front desk agent gave customer reasonable price without permission then serve next customer.
    3. Front of the house- textbook def: Front of the house is who serving the guests. My example: customers get first impression through the front of the house. For instance, I went to Korea on vacation I choose four season hotel because the front desk agency was very caring and patient.
    4. Goal- textbook def: A goal is a specific target to be met. My example: people with a clear goal are easy to success. For instance, a student wants to be a chef, so he focus on learning and develop cooking skill, he will not far near his dream.
    5. Guest satisfaction- textbook def: which leads to guest loyalty and, yes, profit. My example: The restaurant owner knows guest satisfaction important. For instance, he always taught employees put warm smile while they serve customer.
    6. Heart of the house- textbook def: Someone in the back of the house. My example: because someone in heart of the house support well, so the front of the house can serve customer well.
    7. Hospitality- textbook def: The cordial and generous reception of guests or a wide range of businesses. My example: when we serve customer we always make sure they feel our good service and hospitality.
    8. Inseparability – textbook def: The interdependence of hospitality services offered. My example: Inseparability is the characteristic that a service ahs which renders it impossible to divorce the supply or production of the service from its consumption.
    9. Intangible – textbook def: meaning the guest cannot “test drive” a night’s stay or “taste the steak” before dining. Our product is for the guest’s use only, not for possession. Even more unique. My example: travel is a intangible experience, we can’t taste it just review other’s feeling about the destination before we go.
    10. National Restaurant Association (NRA) – textbook def: The forecasts a need for thousands of supervisors and managers for the hospitality and tourism in industries. My example: NRA provide a system for guest search the hotel that they really want.
    11. Perishability – textbook def: The limited lifetime of hospitality products. My example: service is inseparable, so it’s perishability, can’t resell.
    12. Total quality management (TQM) – textbook def: TQW is a continuous process that works best when managers are also good leaders. My example: TQM is the soul of a company, it works by itself benefit employees and customer.
    13. Tourism – textbook def: Travel for recreation or the promotion and arrangement of such travel. My example: the tourism support Miami’s economy.
    14. Sustability – textbook def: Is the ability to achieve continuing economic prosperity while protecting the natural resources of the planet and providing a high quality of life for its people and future generations. My example: we cut one tree should grow a new one make our natural can protect well.
    15. Return on investment – textbook def: for owners and/or shareholders and society. My example: People invest money for us to run a business, and they expect a fair return on their investment.

    Reply
  32. Zhigang Gao

    Zhigang Gao [Gina] HMGT 1101 draft: Chapter2 summary
    10/6/15 Prof. Damien Duchamp
    Chapter two focuses on discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each type of hotel. Also focuses on hotel development and ownership.
    1. Capital intensive def: A business process or an industry that requires large amounts of money and other financial resources to produce a good or service. My example: cranes are capital intensive industry and operation cost, their management is becoming more and more important.
    2. Fair return on investment- def: the return that conforms to the rate of similar investments and reflects a fair payment for property. My example: I put twenty- thousands in a shipping company to share the profit. After one year I got thirty- thousands.
    3. Feasibility study- def: is a process that defines exactly what a project is and what strategic issues need to be considered to assess its feasibility, or likelihood of succeeding. My example: Before I run a new business I used do feasibility study with my partner.
    4. Direct economic impact- def: is a measure of the total amount of additional expenditure within a defined geographical area, which can be directly attributed to staging an event. My example: people’s minimum wages low is the direct economic impact for vacation industry.
    5. Indirect economic impact- My example: RMB depreciation indirect economic impact Chinese tourist number went to the United States.
    6. Franchising- is the practice of the right to use a firm’s business model and brand for a prescribed period of time. My example: my friend got franchising of crown bake store which is a chain store, they require all the store have to obey same rule and decorations.
    7. Management contracts – is an arrangement under which operational control of an enterprise is vested by contract in a separate enterprise that performs the necessary managerial functions in return for a fee. My example: A hotel management contract details the agreement between the owner of a hotel and its operating company.
    8. Real estate investment trusts (REITs) – def: A REIT is a type of security that invests in real estate through property or mortgages and often trades on major exchanges like a stock. My example: REITs have become available in many countries outside the United States on every continent on Earth.
    9. Referral associations – My example: Hotels and motels within a referral association generally share some sort of centralized reservation system and common image such as a logo or advertising
    10. Vacation ownership-My example: vacation ownership benefit for hotel and consumers. Because hotel collected the money they need and consumers save a lot of money.

    Reply
  33. Zhigang Gao

    Zhigang Gao [Gina] HMGT 1101 Chapter3 summary
    10/13/15 Prof. Damien Duchamp
    Chapter three focuses on discuss the functions and departments of a hotel.
    1. Application service provider (ASP) def: is a company that offers individuals or enterprises access over the Internet to applications and related services that would otherwise have to be located in their own personal or enterprise computers. My example: Use application service provider’s system, help hotel save time and money. For this reason, the HR and Financial department no need exit in future.
    2. Average daily rate- My example: The average daily rate used to increase when it is travel peak season.
    3. Call accounting systems- My example: Hospitality is probably the biggest industry to utilize call accounting systems
    4. Catastrophe plans- My example: the catastrophe plans include buy insurance to reduce the risk.
    5. Central reservation office (CRO) – My example: Call central reservation office to book a room.
    6. Central reservation system (CRS)- this system only used by the hotel and resort industry to take care customer’s order or booking.
    7. City ledger – the city ledger is the collection of accounts belonging to non-registered guests. This is distinct from the transient ledger (or front-office ledger, or guest ledger), which is the collection of accounts receivable for guests who are currently registered.
    8. Concierge – My example: the concierge often had a small apartment on the ground floor.
    9. Confirmed reservations-My example: if the hotel holding my credit payment, means my reservations confirmed.
    10. Cost centers- Cost centers include research and development, marketing, help desks and customer service and contact centers.
    11. Daily report- My example: shows how many rooms sold out today.
    12. Employee right to know- My example: as an employee they have right to know their salary and profits.
    13. Executive committee- executive’s duties is to make decisions and ensures that these decisions are carried out
    14. Global distribution systems (GDS)-booking.com through these systems get information, in stance, how many rooms available.
    15. Guaranteed reservations- My example: I book a room. But somehow the certain room not available, they give me double price back.
    16. Night auditor- is a person who works at night at the reception of a hotel. They typically handle both the duties of the front desk agent and some of the duties of the accounting department. This is necessitated by the fact that most fiscal days close at or around midnight, and the normal workday of the employees in the accounting department does not extend to cover this time of day.
    17. Occupational safety and health administration (OSHA) – which sets and enforces protective workplace safety and health standards.
    18. Productivity- is an average measure of the efficiency of production. It can be expressed as the ratio of output to inputs used in the production process, i.e. output per unit of input. When all outputs and inputs are included in the productivity measure it is called total productivity. Outputs and inputs are defined in the total productivity measure as their economic values.
    19. Property management systems (PMS) – also known as PMS or Hotel Operating System (Hotel OS), under business terms may be used in real estate of mind, manufacturing, logistics, intellectual property, government or hospitality accommodation management. They are computerized systems that facilitate the management of properties, personal property, and equipment, including maintenance, legalities and personnel all through a single piece of software essayer.
    20. Revenue management- is the application of disciplined analytics that predict consumer behavior at the micro-market level and optimize product availability and price to maximize revenue growth.
    21. Revenue centers- A revenue centre is one of the five divisions of a responsibility centre – Cost centre, Revenue centre, profit centre, contribution centre and investment centre. Cost centers, like revenue centers, only monitor costs, thereby making them a counterpart to the revenue centre. Revenue centers only measure the output (in fiscal standings) and are therefore marketing establishments which are exempt from profit generation and accountability thereof.
    22. Revenue per available room (REV PAR) – RevPAR, or revenue per available room, is a performance metric in the hotel industry that is calculated by dividing a hotel’s total guestroom revenue by the room count and the number of days in the period being measured.
    23. Room occupancy percentage (ROP) – My example: let’s assume that Company XYZ owns an apartment building that has 300 units. Of those units, 275 are rented out. Using this information and the formula above, we can calculate that Company XYZ’s occupancy rate is: Occupancy Rate = 275/300 = 91.67%
    24. Room rates- the rate charged daily for a hotel room, the room rates change every season.
    25. Room’s division- The Rooms Division consists of two sub-departments, Housekeeping and Front Office. Housekeeping used to be considered “just a cleaning department”, but hotel surveys have shown again and again that cleanliness is at the top of the list of requirements of hotel guests.
    26. Uniformed staff- some internship employees are uniformed staff. They got lower salary than other same level worker.
    27. Yield management- is a variable pricing strategy, based on understanding, anticipating and influencing consumer behavior in order to maximize revenue or profits from a fixed, perishable resource (such as airline seats or hotel room reservations or advertising inventory).

    Reply
  34. Erick T

    Chapter 4

    This chapter talks about the different positions and basic operations of a restaurant. The chapter talks about the different styles of seating arrangements which include theatre style, horseshoe, and dinner style. The bar section of the chapter is interesting, as i bartend a lot. Important formulas were introduced in the chapter, which include, food sales percentage, pour cost percentage, and labor cost percentage. Different positions of management are established, such as the executive chef, restaurant manager, director of catering, and director of food and beverage.

    Banquet- a formal dinner. My ex: A wedding reception.

    Banquet event order- same as a catering event order, informs not only the client but also the hotel personnel about essential information to ensure a successful event.

    Brigade- a team of kitchen personnel organized into stations. My ex. A line cook, salads, sous chef.

    Capture rate- in hotel food and beverage practice, the number of hotel guests who use the food and beverage outlets. My ex. The amount of people that buy from the food stations in a hotel.

    Catering- the part of the food and beverage division of a hotel that is responsible for arranging and planning food and beverage functions for conventions and smaller hotel groups, and local banquets booked by the sales department. My ex. Large food orders going out private events.

    Catering coordinator- has an exacting job in managing the office and controlling the “bible” or functions diary, now on a computer. My ex. The person in charge of organizing a catering order.

    Catering event order- same as a banquet event order.

    Catering services manager- in charge of the function from the time the client is introduced to the CSM. Head of catering department. My ex. In charge of making sure everything is going well.]

    Chef tournant- A chef who rotates the various stations in the kitchen to relieve the station chefs. My ex. Has to be an experienced chef, as they have to be very knowledgeable and requires the ability to be comfortable in every stations.

    Chief steward- the individual in a hotel, club, or foodservice operation who is responsible for the cleanliness of the back of the house and dishwashing areas and for storage and control of china, glassware, and silverware. My ex. Can also be like a kitchen manager.

    Classroom style seating- a type of meeting setup generally used in instructional meetings, such as workshops. My ex. The Anna Nurse workshops.

    Contribution margin- key operating figure in menu engineering, determined by subtracting food cost from the selling price as a measure of profitability.

    dinner style room seating- catered at round tables of 8 or 10 persons for large parties and on boardroom style tables for smaller numbers My ex. Wedding reception tables.

    Director of catering- responsible to the food and beverage director for selling and servicing, catering, banquets, meetings, and exhibitions in a way that exceeds guests’ expectations and produces a reasonible profit. My ex. Can be perhaps the person that oversees the entire catering process.

    director of food and beverage- reports to the general manager is responsible for the efficient and effective operation of the kitchen, restaurants, lounges.

    executive chef- responsible to the director of food and beverage for the efficient and effective operation of kitchen and food production. My ex. Bobby flay in his restaurant.

    food cost percentage-the cost of food divided by the amount of food sales. My ex. The cost of the food, not including the final price.

    food sales percentage- may also be expressed as a labor percentage. My ex: The cost of labor in proportion to the food cost.

    horseshoe-style room seating- frequently used when interaction is sought among the delegates, such as training sessions and workshops.

    Kitchen manager- the individual who manages the kitchen. My ex. Maintains order in the kitchen, roughly the same roles the the manager for the front of house.

    labor cost percentage- labor costs divided by net sales times 100; similar to food cost percentage.

    perpetual inventory- a running inventory that automatically updates itself.

    pilferage- stealing My ex: THeft is caught by inventory, and cameras. Not good.

    pour/cost percentage- dividing the cost of depleted inventory by sales over a period of time.

    responsible alcoholic beverage service- serving alcohol to non-intoxicated persons, and not serving to people underage. My ex. I have to ID people that look under 30, making sure that there isnt undercover cops that could fine us.

    restaurant manager- the head of operations in a restaurant. My ex. In charge of payroll, manages the employees, deals with problems that may occur in a restaurant.

    Room service- the cleaning of rooms and resupplying of materials by the housekeeping staff. My ex. You can call the staff in a hotel, and ask for some extra towels, or some extra sheets, and they will assist you.

    shopper- people who are paid to use a bar as a regular customer except they observe he operation closely. My ex. Shoppers are hired and sent by corporate, ( in chain stores), to review the restaurant, to make sure everything is running as it should.

    sous chef- a cook who supervises food production and reports to the executive chef; he or she is second in command.

    station chef- a chef in charge of a station. My ex. Could be in charge of salads, grill, or maybe even friers.

    theatre style meeting seating- a meeting setup usually intended for a large audience that is not likely to need to take notes or refer to documents. It generally consists of a raised platform and a lectern from which the presenter addresses the audience. My ex. Seating closely related to the anna nurse workshops.

    Reply
    1. Kesso Diallo

      Kesso Diallo
      Prof. Duchamp
      chapter 4 summary

      Chapter 4 discusses about food & beverages, it also explains the job requirement and skills to function a hotel , restaurant , bar e.t.c . Also it discusses about how room service developed , type of problems you might encounter running a type of business.

      1. Banquet:
      All restaurants have banquet style dining, which sets up multiple groups of people, dining in one main area.

      2. Banquet Event Order (BEO) / Catering Event Order (CEO):
      Banquet Event Order, is also known as the “Catering Event Order.” Providing the what, when, where and how, to ensure a successful event for the client, as well as the hotel.

      3. Brigade:
      The kitchen staff, from the Sous to the Pastry Chef’s and all in between, are known as the “brigade.” This name was given to them by the illustrious, Escoffier, pioneer to the hospitality industry.

      4. Capture Rate:
      A method, used by staff to calculate the number of expected guest, for any particular event or function.

      5. Catering:
      Handles all of the food and beverage preparation/services, for any given event, regardless of size.

      6. Catering Coordinator:
      Specifically handles the role of, updating the function diary, as well as managing the office.

      7. Catering Services Manager (CSM):
      Has the arduous task of multitasking. Between scheduling staff, checking last minute details, to gratuity distribution, and more.

      8. Chef Tournant:
      This title follows after the Sous Chef. The Tournant assists when it is necessary to replace or rotate for the station chef heads.

      9. Chief Steward:
      The responsibility of this position is to manage tasks in the “back of the house,” such as, routine inventory checks, maintaining proper hygiene standards, and kitchen equipment function.

      10. Classroom-style Seating:
      Have their tables and chairs, setup just like a classroom setting of tables and chairs situated in rows and columns, preferably for business meetings, in which the classroom seating is better suited for note taking.

      11. Contribution Margin:
      To determine if the day was profitable, the contribution margin is calculated by subtracting the “food cost from the selling price.”

      12. Dinner-style Room Seating:
      Great for board room style events, weddings and small gatherings.

      13. Director of Catering (DOC):
      Another busy role, where the DOC works closely with division manager and the executive chef, ensure that reserved rooms are fully equipped. Events are seamlessly, menus meet the needs of all guests, and that budgets are properly reconciled.

      14. Director of Food & Beverage:
      Although top of the food chain in their division, they still report to the General Manager. They must have the ability to also multitask, and through their leadership effectively & efficiently operate the several departments, while keep costs under control, staff happy and knowledgeable, and trends relevant.

      15. Executive Chef:
      While the Exec Chef reports to the Dir. of Food & Beverage, they’re responsible for appeasing the guest’s palate. Where their individual tastes can find no wrong with your cuisine.

      16. Food Cost Percentage:
      Is calculated by simply dividing the cost of food, by the food sales.

      17. Food Sales Percentage:
      Goes hand in hand with;” Labor Cost Percentage,” because the food sales percentage depends on what the difference is between the, labor cost and the food sales.

      18. Horseshoe-style Room Seating:
      This seating style is preferred by groups who have events, such as, workshops and trainings.

      19. Kitchen Manager:
      Are also known as “Executive Chefs,” and can serve as the food & beverage directors, depending on the size of the hotel or restaurant.

      20. Labor Cost Percentage:
      Based on whether the ingredients purchased are, processed bulk or natural/raw foods, determines the labor cost percentage.

      21. Perpetual Inventory:
      Are food items that are never ending, routine, always used, which allows the kitchen to calculate potential food costs.

      22. Pilferage:
      Theft of services. Staff in the past have been known to steal, by taking small amounts of food or beverages, thinking that such a small amount would not be noticed. Also, underserving or over serving is another issue that is considered as pilfering.

      24. Pour/cost percentage: the cost percentage relating to beverage control.

      25. Responsible alcoholic beverage service: While working at the Bar Mike made sure to I.D. everyone to make sure he wasn’t serving to a minor this is an act of Responsible alcoholic beverage service

      26. Restaurant Manager: After becoming an executive chef i would love to be a restaurant manager.

      27. Room Service: Room service is a key responsibility in a hotel cleanliness.

      28. Shopper: A mystery shopper went to a bar to observe the bar and the service.

      29. Sous Chef: Having a great sous chef as your second in command is a critical key to a successful restaurant.

      30. Station Chef: Michael was a station chef for the protein during lunch service.

      31. Theater-style room seating: The hotel were arranging the conference room in a theater style seating for a play they were hosting.

      Reply
  35. gaozhigang

    Zhigang Gao [Gina]
    HMGT 1101

    Prof. Duchamp
    Chapter four focuses on describe the duties and responsibilities of all key department heads.
    1. Banquet def: a large meal or feast, complete with main courses and desserts. My example: When I entered the banquet hall, the scents of roasted meat and other food make my stomach roar.
    2. Banquet event order(BEO): def: commonly referred to as a “BEO,” is a document that outlines the details of your event. My example: before the banquet start, the manager check the BEO, ensure the banquet held success.
    3. Brigade def: subdivision of an army, typically consisting of a small number of infantry battalions and/or other units and often forming part of a division. My example: At my brother’s wedding party, we brigaded the three hundred guests to their tables.
    4. Capture rate def: The Capture Rate is calculated by dividing the total number of units at the property by the total number of age and income qualified renter Households in the primary market rate area. I cannot capture your value in an hourly rate.
    5. Catering: Def: NORTH AMERICAN provides food and drink, typically at social events and in a professional capacity. My example: he catered a lunch for 20 people.
    6. Catering coordinator: My example: Catering coordinator makes sure those tasks are completed according to client specifications.
    7. Catering event order (CEO): My example: before the banquet start we should check the catering event order carefully.
    8. Catering services manager (CSM): My example: If the staff falls behind serving food for the client, the catering services manager should help the service staff on the floor.
    9. Chef tournant: def: The Relief cook. This term describes the cook in the kitchen who provides help to all the different cooks rather than having a specific job. My example: When the first sous-chef or other chef get sick couldn’t come to work, chef tournant can instead of him that day.
    10. Chief Steward Def: a A chief steward is the senior unlicensed crew member working in the Steward’s Department of a ship. Since there is no purser on most ships in the United States Merchant Marine, the steward is the senior person in the department, whence its name. My example: A chief steward working in the stewarding department in a hotel.
    11. Classroom-style seating Def: This style reflects the seating found in a school or lecture theatre, with chairs and trestle tables aligned in consecutive straight rows. My example: B Company held a meeting for seventy employees, so they need classroom-style seating.
    12. Contribution margin, my example: Once I know the selling price and direct costs of each product or service unit you sell, I can calculate your contribution margin in dollars per unit.
    13. Dinner-style room seating Def: This styles similar to a round dinner table, with the audience seated around the circumference facing inwards. My example: A company will held a meeting for 10 managers in a dinner-style room seating meeting room.
    14. Director of catering (DOC) Def: The Director of Catering is responsible for co-coordinating all phases of group meeting/banquet functions held in the Hotel. My example: Lisa is a director of catering, she and her groups to ensure guest satisfaction and repeat business.
    15. Director of food and beverage: My example: food safety is the most concern for Director of food and beverage
    16. Executive chef: My example Gordon James Ramsay is a famous British Executive chef
    17. Food cost percentage: My example: a hamburger cost $2, if selling for$4 then modifies 100, the Food cost percentage is 50%.
    18. Food sales percentage: My example: If total sales are $100, total cost of sales is $33, the food sales percentage is 33%.
    19. Horseshoe-style room seating: Popular for large meetings, presentations, team briefings
    20. Kitchen manager Def: A kitchen manager is responsible for the overall operations for the back of house and kitchen area of a restaurant. My example: A Kitchen manager goes to market find good vendors to purchase fresh vegetables.
    21. Labor cost percentage My example: labor costs $8,000 per month. If the total cost of doing business is $15,000 per month, you divide $8,000 by $15,000, which equals 0.53, or 53 percent.
    22. Perpetual inventory: My example: Under the perpetual inventory system, the Merchandise Inventory and Cost of Goods Sold accounts will always show the balance of merchandise on hand and the total cost of goods sold for the period.
    23. Pilferage: My example: He puts his pilferage at a modest 2kg of rice for every 52kg-sack he handles.
    24. Pour/cost percentage : Def: it’s how much booze you had when you started, plus how much you spent, minus how much you have on hand, divided by how much you sold. For example, a pour cost of 18.3% might be cause for elation if the previous period’s figure was 20.3% or alarm if it was 16.3%.
    25. Responsible alcoholic beverage service My example:”No employee will serve an alcoholic beverage to anyone under the age of 21.”is the one of policy of Responsible alcoholic beverage service.
    26. Restaurant manager: Def: Restaurant management is the profession of managing a restaurant. My example: In the morning Restaurant manager make sure all the plates washed well, all the employees on their positions.
    27. Room service: My example: when I live in a hotel, I call restaurant delivery meal to my room.
    28. Shopper: My example: shopper is customer, they are the reason why we open restaurant.
    29. Sous chef: Def: The chef who is second in authority in a restaurant or kitchen, ranking below the head chef. My example: Smaller restaurant might not have a sous-chef, but bigger one might have more than one.
    30. Station chef: In most kitchens however the chef is the only worker in that department. We also call line cook.
    31. Theater-style room seating Def: is a structure where theatrical works or plays are performed or other performances such as musical concerts may be produced. My example: Theaters may be built specifically for a certain types of productions, they may serve for more general performance needs or they may be adapted or converted for use as a theater.

    Reply
  36. Victoria A. Gaston

    Victoria Gaston
    Professor Damien Duchamp
    HMGT1101

    “Chapter 4 Summary”

    Chapter four focuses on the daily food and beverage operations within hotels. It explains the different roles within the department, such as, the director of food and beverage, kitchen manager-executive chef, director of catering, restaurant manager, etc. the chapter gives details about each other the different positions, explaining their duties and what they are responsible for.

    1. Banquet- My example: The hotel has special offers for hosting formal dinners (banquets).
    2. Banquet Event Order (BEO)- My example: An order of requirements that should be followed so that a banquet event can be successful.
    3. Brigade- My example: Large kitchens within hotels/restaurants are successfully managed using the brigade system to keep order in the kitchen.
    4. Capture Rate- My example: A system used to calculate the number of guest for any events or organizations.
    5. Catering- My example: My example: Services for delivering and handling all foods and beverages for events.
    6. Catering Coordinator- My example: Lead role in making all updates in catering events and reviews all catering contracts of the guests, and manages catering office.
    7. Catering Event Order (CEO)- My example: In charge of providing all that the client wants.
    8. Catering Services Manager (CSM)- My example: CSM produces revenue and profit on all events, makes sure to meet all client expectations on food and beverage services.
    9. Chef Tournant- My example: Dan is able to rotate throughout the kitchen to the different stations filling in for the stations chefs when needed.
    10. Chef Steward- My example: Tim is responsible for the cleanliness of the entire back of the house at his job.
    11. Classroom-Style Seating- My example: Host has rows and columns of desk for a meeting in order to have good note taking.
    12. Contribution Margin- My example: To determine the daily profits you have to subtract the food cost from the selling price.
    13. Dinner-Style Room Seating- My example: Small events, weddings, and other social gathers usually have dinner-style room seating.
    14. Director of Catering (DOC)- My example: As the director of catering, Liv must lead a team of employees, responsible for selling and services, the catering, banquets, meetings, catering maintained, etc; exceeding guest satisfaction and making profit.
    15. Director of Food and Beverage- My example: Gina is the director of food and beverage, she must report to the general manager and is responsible for the function of the kitchen, restaurants, and lounging departments within the hotel.
    16. Executive Chef- My example: Phil us the executive chef at the most popular restaurant in his hometown.
    17. Food Cost Percentage- My example: Cost of food divided by amount of food sales; formula used to determine how much food was sold.
    18. Food Sales Percentage- My example: Food sale percentage depends on the difference between labor cost and food sales.
    19. Horseshoe-Style Room Seating- My example: Usual room seating for events like workshops, and training sessions.
    20. Kitchen Manager- My example: Known as executive chefs, and can serve as the food & beverage directors, depending on the size of the hotel or restaurant.
    21. Labor Cost Percentage- My example: Depending on the amount of convenience foods purchased vs. raw ingredients.
    22. Perpetual Inventory- My example: The executive chef uses a software for inventory that automatically updates itself to calculate potential food costs.
    23. Pilferage- My example: Theft, underserving and over serving within the work place is consider pilferage.
    24. Pour/Cost Percentage- My example: Bar efficiency; dividing the cost of depleted inventory by sales over a period of time.
    25. Responsible Alcoholic Beverage Service- My example: Staff is properly trained to on the importance of the alcohol policies.
    26. Restaurant Manager- My example: Just as a restaurant manager in a restaurant, a restaurant manager in a hotel duties are hiring, training, efficiency of hotel, guest satisfaction, etc.
    27. Room Service- My example: Services offered to guest, allowing them meals from the hotel delivered to their rooms.
    28. Shopper- My example: Amy was paid to sit around at the bar of the hotel, to closely watch how the bar is being operated.
    29. Sous Chef- My example: Under the executive chef, runs the kitchen daily during kitchen shifts.
    30. Station Chef- My example: The Station Chefs consist of a, Sauce, Roast, Fish, Pantry, Banquet, Pastry, and Vegetable Chef’s.
    31. Theatre-Style Room Seating- My example: Set up for events that require an audiovisual platform and other audio equipment.

    Reply
  37. London

    Prof D. Duchamp: HMGT 1101
    By Paulette Powell

    Chapter 5 – Beverages (Summary)

    Knowing and understanding the alcoholic beverage, is extremely important. Not just for the pleasure of consuming it, but the responsibility and the liabilities of serving it.
    For the wine connoisseur, I will be able to pair the appropriate wine with the right foods, by learning about the various variety of grapes available. For the beer drinker, the variety is almost as vast as wines, new flavors being developed daily, and identifying these components, will help me recognize with ease the guest’s palate.

    1. Alcoholic Beverage:
    If you requested an alcoholic beverage at a bar, you would be served either, wine, beer or a spirit.

    2. Beer:
    In the U.K, the Brit’s love a good lager, which is normally a clear light-bodied, refreshing drink beer. Other types are known as Ales or Stouts.

    3. Brandy:
    Comes from distilled wines, such as the top 3; Remy Martin, Hennessey, and Courvoisier.

    4. Champagne:
    Origin, France. Champagne is a twice fermented wine, which is what causes the sparkling/bubbles in the wine. Popular brands, Veuve Cliquot, Moet, and G.H Mumm.

    5. Cognac:
    Is considered globally as the best brandy, more refined than that of the traditional version. Our popular cognac cousins, are; Remy Martin V.S.O.P (Very Special Old Pale) cognac, also Hennessey Privilege V.S.O.P.
    6. Dram Shop Legislation:
    Is the legislation that governs the sale of an alcoholic beverage; meaning: this civil damage act of 1850, holds an owner/operator of a drinking venue liable for any injury caused by an intoxicated guest.

    7. Fermentation:
    A process that occurs in both wine and beer making, that causes the beverage to become carbonated. For wine, CO2 comes from the yeast of the skins of the grapes, and for beer, the CO2 is captured during the fermentation process inside of the bottle, so it doesn’t have to be added artificially.

    8. Fining:
    The reason for fining is to remove any remaining particles and to keep the wine from losing its consistency, before it’s bottled.

    9. Fortified Wines:
    Wines that have had either brandy or wine alcohol added to it, which makes it stronger and sweeter than regular wines, are called, “Fortified.” Drinks such as a Sherry or Port, would be an example of a fortified wine.

    10. Hops / Malt / Yeast:
    These 3 ingredients are the beginning process of the

    11. Inventory Control:
    Is extremely important in the bar business, because if you over/under pour on a drink, you are either losing money from the over pour (giving away your inventory) or you under pour (losing repeat guests and their referrals), but the most unfortunate is staff theft. Some might drink away your inventory, while on duty (lose in money).

    12. Liquor / Spirit:
    Is a liquid that has been fermented and distilled.

    13. Mashing:
    Where you would grind the malt and extract any bits and pieces that don’t belong. Then it sits in a copper or stainless steel container, called a hopper.

    14. Must:
    The juice that is extracted from grapes is called “must.”

    15. Non-alcoholic Beverage:
    Due to our now health conscious consumer, non-alcoholic beverages have become very popular. Including the non-alcoholic beers. RE: Drunk driving, high for our teen population.

    16. Prohibition:
    Prohibition was an act enforced, during (1919 – 1933), where making, storing, transport and selling of alcohol was considered illegal.

    17. Proof:
    When an alcohol has a proof content it means that it is twice the amount of the percentage of alcohol that’s in it. Ex: 40% content = an 80 proof alcohol.

    18. Sparkling Wine:
    Have been given the term “sparkling,” due to carbon dioxide produced during fermentation. The #1 sparkling wine on the market is “Champagne,” and then there are white and rose sparkling wines too.

    19. Vintage:
    Has everything to do with the age of a wine. Red wines take longer to reach maturity, than white wines. Once a wine has been considered to have reached its “peak.” This is the time when a wine is ready to drink and will then be rated as vintage.

    20. White Spirits:
    Are alcoholic beverages, such as, Gin, Vodka, Tequila and Rum.

    21. Wine:
    Traditional wines are made from the juice of fermented ripe grapes, but there are many which add other fruits to make wines, such as, elderberries, peach, blackberries, and cherries.

    22. Wine and Food Pairing:
    Traditionally wines and foods were paired together base on their colors. For instance, a white wine = white meats (chicken, most fish, seafood veal and pork). Red wines = red meats (beef, lamb, duck, and game birds {like: pheasant}). Dessert wines (sweeter) = cake, tarts, pastries and non-acidic fruit.

    23. Wine Tasting:
    Allow you to use 3 of your senses. Your sense of sight, hold to the light, to identify the wines “color and body.” Your sense of smell, bring to the edge of the glass, and gently inhale the “fragrance bouquet.” Your sense of taste, sip gingerly and let it rest on tongue, with a gentle swish your mouth, enjoy its flavor.

    24. Wort:
    After the mashing process, the liquid formed, called “wort” is then cleaned through filter. Hops is then added and it is boiled for several hours in a brewing kettle.

    Reply
  38. Kunle Kernizan

    HMGT 1101
    Kunle Kernizan

    New York T article Times (Bratislava Panelaks)
    This article is about the post-Soviet Architecture of public housing in Bratislava Slovakia. He starts by describing the Soviet ideology on housing, which was that every person identical housing units that allowed workers to live in large cities. It describes the area’s history as an area of internment for Hungarians nationals and later Jewish people during Nazi occupation. They describe how the first non-communist president of Czechoslovakia viewed these are buildings simultaneously undignified but also as important to the cities character as the old castle.
    The writer describes how he traveled to Bratislava with a fellow traveler from Vienna to view the cities architectural wonders from the communist era. Examples of this are the national art gallery, Slovensky Rozhlas which is the name of the city’s radio stations and the city square known as Nametsie Slobody. They also viewed the bridges over the Danube River and the Jewish Quarter. She also describes the different company campuses in a place called Aupark. She describes the effect of capitalism such as people with phones and a $120 meal and drink for her and her friend. She then returns to the Panelak housing and how it just exists without any idea of it being for the poor as in the USA.
    I think that Bratislava is a city that is changing again after the fall of communism and development by the outside world. The panelaks seem to have changed from Soviet housing Relics something that has not changed over the past twenty years. It is similar to the Lower East Sides tenements, that were built to house recent immigrants but transformed into an historical monument of the city’s history.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/01/travel/slovakia-bratislava-tourism.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Ftravel&action=click&contentCollection=travel&region=rank&module=package&version=highlights&contentPlacement=3&pgtype=sectionfront&_r=0

    Reply
  39. Joe

    Johandry veras
    HMGT 1101
    Prof. Duchamp
    Chapter 5
    In Chapter 5,

    Key Words:
    Alcoholic Beverage: In my bar the main drinks are Alcoholic Beverage.
    Beer: My friend Tambien got drunk in the bar last Sunday drinking beers, he is not used to drink beers.
    Brandy: For the upcoming event we have two have at least two bandy drinks so we can serves after the food.
    Champagne: The champagne is essential for this wedding on Saturday, the groom is willing to pay more for champagne.
    Cognac: In this restaurant we have the best brandy wine, the cognac.
    Dram Shop Legislation: The legislation that governs the sale of alcoholic beverage.
    Fermentation: The second step in the process of making wine is fermentation of the must. A natural phenomenon cause by the yeast on the skin of the grapes.
    Fining: fining the wine to take out all particles not wished in it and makes it have a better consistency.
    Fortified wines:The guest request a wine with a stronger taste and much alcohol so I think we should select a fortified wine.
    Hops: It is added once the liquid (wine) flows into a brewing kettle.
    Inventory Control: If we want to have a good profit, we have to use an effective inventory control.
    Liquor: In my bar 97% of beverage is liquor since this is a bar to do shots.
    Malt: The beer is malt because it is naturally fermented.
    Mashing: It is the process of mashing the grapes to convert it in wine.
    Must: I love watching how the must is extracted from the grapes.
    Nonalcoholic Beverage: Since I have to drive, I will be drinking Nonalcoholic beverages.
    Prohibition: It was an act in the 1919-1933 where transporting and selling alcohol was illegal.
    Proof: This bottle has a proof level, which means that has an extra percentage of alcohol.
    Sparkling wine: In my menu the sparkling wine available for this week is the sparkling white wine.
    Spirit: This beverage has 25% of alcohol which makes it be a spirit wine because it pass the 20% of alcohol.
    Vintage: This wine is being peaked today so it is already a vintage.
    White Spirits: I love mixing white spirits like vodka with orange juice.
    Wine: There is nothing better than taking at home and relax with the family drinking wine.
    Wine and food pairing: In my restaurant we have the tradition to pair the wine with the color of the food. If it is a white meat, we pair it with white wine and if it is red meat we paired it with red wine.
    Wine tasting: There are three steps that combined is a wine tasting process. The sight (looking at the color), the smell, and also the taste (drinking it).
    Wort: Once the grapes are smashed the liquid that comes from it is call wort.
    Yeast: The yeast is the fermenting agent of a liquid.

    Reply
  40. Joe

    Johandry Veras
    Perspectives in Hospitality Management
    Prof. Damien Duchamp
    November 9, 2015
    Chapter 10

    Key Words
    City Clubs- This is like a club that require a membership, its most of the time a club for sport, recreation, university and much more.
    Club Management- Is responsible for planning, forecasting and budgeting, human resources, etc.
    Commercial Recreation- Provides guides to tourist from amusement and recreation.
    Country Clubs- Places near the beaches.
    Government-Sponsored Recreation- Government sponsored recreation by using the taxes taken in the state.
    Heritage Tourism- It is like some catholic church make trips to the Vatican and they little by little make everybody go year after year.
    Leisure- When I get out of work earlier on Fridays I like to go to the park and recreate.
    National Parks- Parks naturally as playground that are being conserved for the public through the National Park Service.
    National Parks Service- It was found to conserve the natural resources from parks.
    National Register of Historic Places- It is where the Government keep on list all the historic places and any object worthy.
    Noncommercial Recreation- Voluntary army, students and campus are example of noncommercial recreation.
    Recreation- It is just when you take your time and place to relax and calm your soul.
    Recreation for Special Populations-I think it is a great idea to be part of an Recreation for Special Population since they help with people with illness.
    Recreation Management- To be a recreation manager you need to go to college and get a degree.
    Theme Parks- It vary, it might be because of history, location or cultural.
    Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT)- When you go to a hotel you get charge for accommodation and this taxes are called Transient Occupancy.
    Voluntary Organizations- are nongovernmental, nonprofit agencies, serving the public at large elements.

    Reply
  41. Erick T

    Erick Tecuatl- Chapter 10 Summary
    Chapter 10 talks about the different types of attractions that exist. Necessary for tourism, there are various attractions, or land marks that either man made or hold vital historical value. The chapter introduces Walt Disney, who at the age of 21 began making shorts title Alice comedies. Four years, he created Mickey Mouse and success ensued. His success gave birth to many theme parks, museums, and studios which include Hollywood studios, Magic kingdom, and the Epcot Center in Florida. Aside from Walt Disney, Hershey Park, Sea World, Dollywood, Gatorland, and many more theme parks were introduced in this chapter. There are all famous attractions that many people visit every year.

    City Clubs- Various clubs in the city. Has to do with various activities, associated with sports, and miscellaneous activities.
    Club management- the management of clubs
    Commercial recreation-for profit recreation
    Country clubs-clubs that offer members golf and sometimes other sporting activities such as tennis and swimming along with games and social activities.
    Government-sponsored recreation-recreation paid for by government taxes; includes monies sent to cities for museums, libraries, and municipal golf courses.
    Heritage tourism- tourism that involves or relates to tourism.
    Leisure- freedom from activities, especially time free from work or duties.
    National park- a park belonging to a nation. National parks include Yellowstone National park, Yosemite National Park, and many more.
    National parks service-the service that manages state parks
    National register of historic places- official list of the nations historic places worthy of preservation. http://www.nps.gov/nr/
    Noncommercial recreation- non for profit recreations
    Recreation- refreshment of strength and spirits after work; a means of diversion
    Recreation for special populations-recreation designed to accommodate persons with disabilities, for example the special Olympics.
    Recreation management-the management of a specific recreational park.
    Theme parks- a recreational park based on a particular setting or artistic interpretation; may operate with hundreds or thousands of acres of parkland and hundreds or thousands of employees. Hershey park, Dorney Park, Sea world, 6 flags.
    Transient occupancy tax (TOT)- tax paid by people staying in a city’s hotels.
    Voluntary organizations- a nongovernmental, nonprofit agency serving the public.

    Reply
  42. Daniella Martinez

    Daniella Martinez
    Prof. Duchamp
    11/9/15
    Chapter 10

    Chapter 10 Summary
    In chapter ten, the textbook explains to us what recreation is and the many different ways it’s provided to us. Recreational activities can range from amusement parks to even cultural pursuits. There are different noncommercial recreation centers that we probably attend and never really thought about it. The U.S. preserves their national parks for public use as well as emphasizing the importance/maintenance of the ecosystem. Clubs are also considered as recreational gathering places where people can represent to other members their own interests.

    1) National Parks: Giselle went with her family to the North Cascades in Washington because she heard it is one of the most appealing national parks in the states.
    2) National Parks Service: In order to maintain the adequate resources and preservation of national parks, the national parks service provides the right protection.
    3) Recreation management: Jayla decide to go for a degree that focuses on recreation management since she’s always wanted to own a commercial recreation.
    4) Commercial recreation: The last time Michelle visited a commercial recreation was back in 2008, when she had gone to Six Flags with her cousin.
    5) Theme parks: I went to Hurricane Harbor last Summer with Angelica because it’s one of the most known water theme parks.
    6) Heritage tourism: I’d rather engage in a heritage tourism group because of the passive and historic culture behind it.
    7) National Register of Historic Places: In order to figure out the most worthy-known, iconic place, you’d need to check the official list of districts from the National Register of Historic Places.
    8) Club management: hotel management is just as similar as club-owning management which are in charge of all facilities and the maintenance as well.
    9) Country clubs: Jessica decided to stay at a country club because she figured they’d have more lounges and restaurants and a lot more services to provide for their guests.
    10) City clubs: The Acme corp. wanted to stay at a city club that would allow for their business-related meetings to take place.
    11) Voluntary organizations: In order to gain a multi serviced program that allowed recreational opportunities, Jessica decided it was best to join a voluntary organization like the YMCA.
    12) Recreation for special populations: David who was diagnosed with Down syndrome was placed in a recreation center for special needs.
    13) Government-sponsored recreation: Government raises special revenue such as income taxes, sales taxes and property taxes on recreation-related services.
    14)Transient occupancy taxes: TOT’s are placed upon hotel accommodations, state lotteries in order to raise special revenue.
    15)Leisure: Everyone deserves to have some “leisure time” because everyone has to have a break from work at some point.
    16)Noncommercial recreation: The armed forces have their own noncommercial recreational program to provide the physical social and mental being of it’s personnel.

    Reply
  43. Mariama Bah

    Mariama Bah
    Professor Damien Duchamp
    HMGT 1101
    November 9, 2015

    Summary

    Chapter 10 focuses on all aspects of Recreation, What is recreation, What people do during recreation and the different types of recreation. Some of the recreational activities range from cultural like theaters and museums to sports or outdoor recreation like theme parks, community centers, parks and libraries. The Chapter also talks about National Parks and the different type and what they are used for in a public setting and lastly the Chapter talks about the different types of Clubs such as country and city clubs and the non commercial recreation which talks about government involvement and non profit organizations. In reading this Chapter I have learned a lot about recreation and what can be considered recreation and the involvement of the government in some of these settings.

    Key Words and Concepts

    1. City Clubs: YMCA is a type of city club that does various activities for people of all ages.

    2. Club Management: having good club management is key to offering some of the best services to the club members and their guest.

    3. Commercial Recreation: Anna was in charge of planning a commercial recreation event in order to raise money for an organization of her manager’s choice.

    4. Country Clubs: Working at the country club for five years through college, David learned a lot about sports especially golf and was able to network with some of the ongoing members.

    5. Government sponsored recreation: museums, libraries and city recreation center are all examples of government sponsored recreation.

    6. Heritage Tourism: visiting Ellis island is part of heritage tourism because of the history the island holds.

    7. Leisure: having leisure time in the hospitality field is rare and when you do have it take full advantage of it.

    8. National Park: The everglades, kings canyon and yellow stone are all national parks.

    9. National Park Service: The people who work for the national parks are part of the national parks service.

    10. National Register of Historic Places: As a concierge Mike made his own national register of historic places that catered to the Washington, DC. area so that he was able to share it with the guest.

    11. Noncommercial Recreation: A not for profit recreation is also known as a non commercial recreation.

    12. Recreation: A lot of people turn to recreation activities as a way of staying fit and releasing stress.

    13. Recreation for special populations: The special Olympics is a form of recreation for special populations.

    14. Recreation management: Event planning, meeting planning and commercial recreation are all examples of recreation management.

    15. Theme Parks: Six flags, Dorney Park, Splish Splash and Kings Dominion are all theme parks.

    16. Transient occupancy tax (TOT): While looking over his bill for his hotel stay in NY, Kevin noticed he was charge a TOT.

    17. Voluntary organizations: NAACP is a voluntary organization that fights for the equality of rights for colored people.

    Reply
  44. Arian Florez

    Arian Florez

    Chapter 10 focuses on Recreation, Attractions, and Clubs. It talks about what people do for recreation, as well as different kinds of recreation. The textbook uses Walt Disney as an example as his resorts have become a household name. This chapter also talks about public parks and their role in preserving the environment. Also, they talk about various clubs, both governmental and voluntary, and the role they play.

    Key Words/Concepts
    1. City Clubs: YMCA, YWCA, Boys & Girls Club, etc.
    2. Club Management: The management for clubs, a council or team
    3. Commercial Recreation: For-profit recreation, such as Disney World or Six Flags
    4. Country Clubs: Requires membership, usually pertains to golf plus some extras
    5. Government sponsored recreation: Fun stuff sponsored by the government. I.e. museums, zoos, aquariums.
    6. Heritage Tourism: Tourism relating to heritage. For example, visiting an old slave house, an old church or school, Indian reservation.
    7. Leisure: Time away from work or other responsibilities, “chill time”
    8. National Park: Yellowstone Park
    9. National Park Service: Smokey the Bear and other park rangers
    10. National Register of Historic Places: Basically a list of places worthy of preservation, historically significant
    11. Noncommercial Recreation: Not for profit recreation: Car Wash to raise money for school books, Walk for Aids, etc.
    12. Recreation: What people do to alleviate stress or in their free time.
    13. Recreation for special populations: ex. Special Olympics
    14. Recreation management: Management of recreation, party planner, event planner
    15. Theme Parks: ex. Six Flags, Hershey Park, Disney World
    16. Transient occupancy tax (TOT): A tax paid by people staying in a city’s hotels.
    17. Voluntary organizations: Nongovernmental nonprofit agency serving the public. I.e. Care, City Harvest, Soup Kitchens

    Reply
  45. Mariama Bah

    Mariama Bah
    Professor Damien Duchamp
    HMGT 1101
    November 15, 2015

    Summary

    Chapter 11 focuses on the all the aspects of the Casino Industry which has been booming as of lately. The casino industry includes gambling and traditional aspects of hospitality. Gambling is put into two sections social gambling and mercantile gambling. The chapter informs us about how to manage a casino resort, the type of relationships needed to maintain a casino resort, the different types of games played at the casino’s. We also learn that casino gambling is regulated by state governments and the relationship that’s been built over time is what has been keeping the casino industry.

    Key Words and Concepts

    1. Baccarat: In order to win at a game of baccarat your ending hand has to total to nine or be the closet to nine.

    2. Blackjack: Counting cards is illegal when playing blackjack.

    3. Casino Resort: A casino resort caters to all things considered gambling and caters to sleeping arrangement, food and beverage,

    4. Comp: Mike was in charge of handing out comps to the casino patrons during their stay at the resort.

    5. Craps: Craps is a dice game where players make wagers on the outcome of a roll or a series of rolls.

    6. Gambling: Gambling is a tricky thing because you can either win and gain some money or lose and lose a lot of money.

    7. Handle: The handle is the dollars wagered, or bet. When a bet is placed the handle increases by the amount of the bet. The handle is not affected by the bet.

    8. Hold Percentage: The hold percentage is the total of the handle that was won,

    9. Poker: Poker is a card game played by a group of people instead of the casino

    10. Roulette: Roulette is a game played in a casino setting, the dealer spins a wheel and the players take a bet on where the ball will fall.

    11. Win: At the end of their stay mike and his friends went to cash in their wins before leaving the resort.

    Reply
  46. Arian Florez

    Arian Florez
    HMGT 1101
    Prof. Duchamp

    Chapter 11 Summary

    This chapter mainly talks about the various forms of gambling. It goes into depth about how gambling operates in a casino setting, as well as how casinos maintain house advantages. It talks about how the Las Vegas strip developed as well as Atlantic City. It also talks about how hospitality plays into these casinos as many of these huge resorts manage a huge operation.

    Key Words & Concepts
    Baccarat: A casino card game, goal is to get close to 9

    Blackjack: Card game where you get 21 or closest without going over

    Casino Resort: A resort like Caesars Palace, Tropicana. or the Trump Taj Mahal.

    Comp: Complimentary service free of charge. If you spend a lot, maybe get a free drink or food. Incentive to continue gambling.

    Craps: A game of chance played with dice.

    Gambling: Placing bets on things like sports, card games, lottery.

    Handle: The amount bet or wagered, so if you bet 5 on a hand of Poker, the handle would be 5.

    Hold Percentage: The amount that the casino wins over a period of time, for example how much the poker table made in one night.

    Poker: Texas Hold’em, Chinese Poker, 5 Card Stud

    Roulette: Dealer spins the wheel, and players wager which number it will land on.

    Win: The money won by the gaming operation from its customers. Also known as Gross Gaming Revenue

    Reply
  47. Daniella Martinez

    Daniella Martinez
    Prof. Duchamp
    11/16/15
    Chapter 11 Summary

    In Chapter 11 we learn how gambling is an effective way to win money instead of earning it regularly at any job. Just kidding, well chapter 11 does speak of gambling, but the way gambling works and how it’s used. When people gamble at casino resorts, they gamble with money and there are all sorts of games and entertaining systems that are involved with gambling. It involves strategy and skills when it comes to gambling if you’re willing to win. Unfortunately, if you are the winner, you don’t get to keep all the money you’ve earned because part of it must be given to the hotel or resort you’re staying at.

    1) Gambling: If he lost all his money gambling, he had no idea if he were to win or not.

    2) Casino Resort: Casey stayed at a casino resort when he went on vacation with Leslie.

    3) Handle: Janice made a handle of nearly $3,000 while gambling.

    4) Comps: Jaylene was offered a comp as a complimentary service to attract her stay.

    5)Blackjack: Calvin loves to play blackjack because he gets to compete with the dealer.

    6) Craps: Craps is a dice game where Joel loves to gamble upon the outcome of the roll.

    7) Roulette: Just like craps, in roulette Joel can place bets on either of the outcomes from the spin.

    8) Poker: Jessica’s favorite card game is poker because she can win and gamble easily.

    9) Win: Unfortunately, when winning the handle, one is not allowed to keep the money from a bet game because the casino keeps part of it.

    10) Hold percentage: The hold percentage tracks very close to the house edge which maintains the win.

    11) Baccarat: One of the known card games in casinos at baccarat.

    Reply
  48. London

    Prof D. Duchamp: HMGT 1101
    By Paulette Powell

    Chapter 10 – Recreation, Attractions & Clubs (Summary)

    Recreation & Leisure times! This chapter helps define the difference between the two. Recreation, involves activities, whether it’s a sport on the courts, hiking & camping in the great outdoors, to the more relaxing, fishing, video gaming or reading. Then there’s “leisure,” which is better termed as free time, where there might possibly be no work involved for this type of entertainment. Identifying the difference between commercial and noncommercial recreation, and an explanation of what government-sponsored recreation is. Plus the understanding of the operations of a country club, and a listing of the major theme parks across the U.S.

    1. City Clubs:
    Are primarily business orientated clubs, for the crowds that are known as “Suits.” Professionals from, the academic arena, medical, finance etc…

    2. Club Management:
    Is in many ways the comparable to the hotel management industry, such as, member association fees, maintenance of athletic facilities, including in-house functions like HR, planning/budget.

    3. Commercial Recreation:
    Also known as “Eco” or ‘Adventure) tourism. Emphasis on outdoor activities, such as, hiking, biking, walking/jogging trails and skiing.

    4. Country Clubs:
    Are exclusive styled clubs that sometimes charge over inflated annual membership fees. To maintain only the type of client that they would like to attract.

    5. Government-sponsored Recreation:
    Are activities/free programs provided to you by city government agencies, throughout the neighborhoods you live in, such as Department of Parks and Recreation.

    6. Heritage Tourism:
    Over the years, heritage tourism has gained popularity, especially in the baby boomer & senior demographics. Heritage tourism is considered more passive in its activities, such as museums and historical sights of interest.

    7. Leisure:
    Is free time outside of work, to do with what one pleases and at their own will.

    8. National Park:
    Naturally preserved, recreational, landmarks, visited by locals and tourists alike yearly, such as the Grand Canyon.

    9. National Parks Service:
    Is an organization that preserves the integrity/original natural state of the parks, for all to enjoy whatever activities and sights the parks have to offer, for now and future generations.

    10. National Register of Historic Places:
    Is the official ledger of sites and buildings that have been deemed worthy of protection and preservation for as the natural elements will allow.

    11. Noncommercial Recreation:
    Would be considered a nonprofit organization, that doesn’t stand to gain financially from what it does, such a voluntary services.

    12. Recreation:
    Something that we do, that brings us fulfillment and happiness. It benefits our well-being.

    13. Recreation for Special Populations:
    Recreational activities provided to special populations, that may require something else out of the ordinary. Such as being ADA compliant, for guests with special needs.

    14. Recreation Management:
    Was introduced during the mid-20’s, when recreation and social activities were offered as community service. This method gained popularity during the 50’s.

    15. Theme Parks:
    Places such as, Great Adventure, Hershey Park and Dorney Park. Their easily identified by their services with an obvious theme; roller coaster rides, chocolate and water rides.

    16. Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT):
    Are special taxes that are acquired through taxing recreational items, such as “Hotel Accommodations,” and “NYS Lotteries.”

    17. Voluntary Organizations:
    Are nonprofit organizations such as, the YMCA/YWCA and the Boy Scouts/Girl Scouts of America are prime examples of voluntary organizations.

    Reply
  49. gaozhigang

    Summary of chapter 11
    Zhigang Gao [Gina]
    HMGT 1101
    Prof. Duchamp
    Chapter eleven focuses on describe the various components of casino gambling entertainment and the casino industry spread all over the world. The author also tells us the basic principles of casino operations and point out the different positions in the gaming industry.
    1. Baccarat: My example: my boyfriend played a card game called “baccarat” in Atlantic City’s casino; he had good hand and won $500.
    2. Casino resort: we gamble a lot, so the hospitality of the casino gave us hotel rooms and meals for free.
    3. Blackjack: My example: one day we played card game in casino, the dealer paid my friend one and half times his bet for blackjack.
    4. Comp: My example: At our visit to casino resort, we gambled so much and they count our rooms and our meals. We only need to pay tips, gratuities.
    5. Craps: My example: The guy crapped out on his first roll.
    6. Gambling: My example: my uncle addicted in gambling, finally, he lost his house and wife.
    7. Handle: My example: The casino used to have a high handle during the thanksgiving holiday.
    8. Hold percentage: My example: If a slot is designed
    with a 95% payback percentage, it offers the casino a 5% hold percentage.
    9. Poker: My example: Lon and I play in the same weekly poker game.
    10. Roulette: my example: I played roulette, my lucky number 13 came out, the dealer paid me 35 times my bet.
    11. Win :My example: In a Casino :if win is $30 and handle is $200 then hold percentage is 15%
    Money handed over = $200
    Money retained (won by casino) = $30
    Hold = 15%

    Reply
  50. Joe

    Johandry Veras
    Perspectives in Hospitality Management
    Prof. Damien Duchamp
    November 17, 2015
    Chapter 11

    Key Words
    1. Baccarat: I like to play with a card called Baccarat because I always win. Last time I won $800.00.
    2. Blackjack: When I went to play with my family, the dealer paid to my father twice what he bet for Blackjack.
    3. Casino Resort: The Palms Casino Resort is a good Casino Resort located near Las Vegas.
    4. Comp: In this casino we have comps which is complementary goods. We give to one couple (guest) for example a free dinner after gambling. This way we can make them come back since they really spend a lot of money in the casino.
    5. Craps: My sister craps out on her first roll.
    6. Gambling: I love going to Atlantic City, my friend and I love Gambling in Tropicana Hotel.
    7. Handle: The majority of our casino machines has handle no more than $20,000.00.
    8. Hold Percentage: In this Casino we have to adjust the Hold Percentage to a lower percentage, This way we can make more money.
    9. Poker: I like playing Poker online even though I do not like using real money.
    10. Roulette: I do not like playing Roulette because I do not have a good luck. I have played 5 times and I have never won.
    11. Win: It is the handle minus the money paid out of the bet.

    Reply
  51. Kunle Kernizan

    HMGT 1101
    Kunle Kernizan

    Chapter 11

    Chapter 11 is about the history and functions of the casino Resort. The book also describes what gambling is and what kinds of gambling exist and the history of the activity. It starts of from the beginning of civilization to 1638 when Venice started to regulate gambling and created the first casinos. They also describe how Las Vegas formed as the mecca of gambling in the USA and development of casinos in other states.
    It also describes how management is structured in casinos and the point of sales in the casinos.
    They also describe how non-gaming activities are becoming more central to revenue. They also talk about sustainability projects. It also describes how people working in casinos can expect to move in the gaming world.
    Definitions
    Casino Resort- Casino Resorts are some of the most visible businesses in the world. 2/3s of the biggest ones are Las Vegas.
    Gambling- The act of placing stacks on an unknown outcome.
    Social gambling- Conducted among individuals who bet against each other.
    Commercial gambling- conducted against the house.
    House edge- Is a theoretical number that describes the amount of money wagered against the handled.
    Handle- Total amount of money bet at a game.
    Win- Handle minus the money paid out on winning bets.
    Comps- Complimentary goods and services.
    Loyalty programs- Programs that show that someone is repeat customer.

    Reply
  52. Erick T

    Chapter 11 Summary
    This chapter focuses primarily on functions on casinos. In a way, casinos are also gambling, because if anyone gets lucky, then the casion becomes unlucky as they lose money. Either way, casinos gain money, slowly, through a gamble. There are many types of games in casinos, some games give out a higher win value than others, and others benefit more the people than they do the casino. The chapter goes in detail about the different types of casino operations, as well as some statistics on winnings.

    Baccarat-a traditional table game in which the winning hand totals closest to nine. This game is geared more towards the winnings of people, and not as profitable to the casino.
    Blackjack-A table game in which the winning hand is determined by whether the dealer or the player gets cards that add up to a number closest to or equal to 21 without going over. Very popular game, also not profitable to the casino.
    Casino resort- an area in which gaming activities involving table games and slot machines take place. An example of this would be the casinos in Atlantic City.
    comp-complimentary goods and servies offered to casino patrons in order to attract their business. In restaurants, the manager can comp a meal, if a guest isn’t satisfied, or just to make a customer happy.
    craps- a game in which the players make wagers on the outcome of the roll, or a series of rolls, of a pair of dice.
    gambling-the act of placing stakes on an unkown outcome with the possibility of securing a gain if the bettor guesses correctly. Can become highly addicting.
    handle- the dollars wagered, or bet; often confused with win. Whenever a customer places a bet, the handle increases by the amount of the bet. The handle is not affected by the outcome of the bet.
    hold percentage-the percentage f the total handle that is retained as win. Usually tied together with the house edge, which is basically profit for the casino.
    Poker-a card game in which participants play against each other instead of the casino. Not as profitable for the casino as other table games, but this game can also take a lot of skill to master.
    roulette-a traditional table game in which a dealer spins a wheal and players wager ion which number a small ball will fall. Not to be confused with Russian Roulette.
    Win- dollars won by the gaming operation from its customers. The net spending of customers on gaming is called the win, also known as gross gaming revenue. Simply put, a win is the total amount of money you end up taking home.

    Reply
  53. clotilda

    Clotilda Hamilton
    HMGT 1101
    Prof. D. Duchamp
    Chapter 13: Special Events
    In this chapter I learnt about the Special Events Industry. Special events are always planned, they are held for special occasions and are greatly anticipated. Some Special events include Weddings, Sweet 16’s which was made huge by the rich and famous kids, Meetings, Conventions and trade shows. Event Planners are responsible for planning these events from top to bottom. From flights down to car rides. Responsibilities my vary depending on the event. To be a great event planner you need to possess a number of skills including; computer skills, negotiating skills , experience in delegating, enthusiasm and lots of patience just to name a few.
    Key Words and Concept
    1. Charity Balls. We are holding a Charity event for one of our members who’s going through chemotherapy to help pay her hospital bill.

    2. Conventions. There’s an annual New York International Auto show held at the Jacob Javier Center from March 25

    3. Coordination. As a chef I would have to work to with the driver to make sure that I’d would be on time with my appetizers.

    4. Corporate Events. The managers of Sandals are going on a retreat for one week in the Bahamas

    5. Corporate seminars: The Managers of Sandals are going to Jamaica to discuss the toilet paper used in their hotels

    6. Event Planner. The first event planner hired for my daughter’s sweet sixteen was fired because she couldn’t get the right color air max.

    7. Event Planning. I have to hire an event planner for my twenty-fifth birthday. All I have is the budget and the dates. She has to do everything else

    8. Fairs and Festivals. At the Sunnyside food fair this year I was surprised and very happy to see a Jamaican Food stand with oxtail.

    9. International Festival and Events Association (IFEA). St. Lucia jazz and arts festival 2016 will include acts like Robin Thicke

    10. International Special Events Society (ISES). The World cup is gonna be very interesting this year because of the location.

    11. Meeting professionals international (MPI). My ex, Simon Wall is meeting with the president of Guyana this weekend.

    12. Social Functions. My friend Lisa traveled to Florida for her classmates wedding.

    13. Special Events Industry.

    14. Trade Shows .

    15. Weddings and Holiday Parties

    Reply
  54. Arian Florez

    Arian Florez
    HMGT 1101
    Prof. Duchamp

    Chapter 2 Summary

    Chapter 2 breaks down hotel ownership and development. It gives a brief history of Innkeeping in the US and talks about franchises, and how they work. It also classifies different kinds of hotels such as resort hotels, motels, casino hotels, etc. It mentions the Ritz Carlton and the Four Seasons in regards to their high quality service. The chapter ends talking about the different trends in hotels today.

    Key Words and Concepts

    Capital intensive: Something requiring a lot of capital. Example: Starting a business, Buying houses/hotels.

    Fair return on investment: A reasonable return for the amount invested. So ideally anything greater than your initial investment.

    Feasibility study: Assesses the viability of the project. For example, studying supply and demand for ice cream on the Boardwalk and determining whether to open an ice cream stand or not.

    Direct economic impact: If a motel has 5 rooms consistently filled and they produce 100 per room, then the 500 would be considered a direct economic impact.

    Indirect economic impact: Costs that might be incurred by local sales taxes or money spent by employees in the area.

    Franchising: Allows a company to expand rapidly. Examples of this are Starbucks, McDonald’s, Chipotle, Target, Costco, Shop and Shop.

    Management Contracts: When you hire a group of outside managers to take care of the business instead of overseeing it personally.

    Real estate investment trusts (REITs): Facilitates investment in real estate without double taxation levied against an ordinary trust or organization.

    Referral Associations: Associations that refer guests to other participating members. Basically companies that are owned by different people but operate under the same franchise.

    Vacation Ownership: Basically a timeshare, shared ownership of the property and you visit set times throughout the year.

    Reply
  55. Victoria A. Gaston

    Victoria Gaston
    Professor Damien Duchamp
    HMGT1101

    Chapter Summary

    Chapter ten focuses on the different recreations within hospitality and their benefits. Commercial and Noncommercial Recreation are mention in the chapter, and it’s different activities within them, such as, theme parks, clubs and attraction are all commercial recreations. Organizations, nonprofit agencies, armed forces, etc, are all considered noncommercial recreation. The chapter also talks about Clubs and what they are, such as, country clubs, and city clubs, all based off of a particular interests that members share. Alongside this long list, chapter ten discusses the different parks that are used for recreational activities, and also the National parks, such as Yellowstone and Yosemite National Park, and how the government authorizes the land within them.

    1. City Clubs- My Examples: Soho house is a city club for creative people.
    2. Club Managements- My Example: Having good club management leads into great services within the club.
    3. Commercial Recreation- My Example: Dan helped raised money for a nonprofit organization by hosting a commercial recreation event.
    4. Country Clubs- My Example: Bill is a member of a country club where he spends his Sundays golfing and networking amongst other businessmen.
    5. Government-Sponsored Recreation- My Example: Museums, libraries and city recreation center are all examples of government-sponsored recreation.
    6. Heritage Tourism- My Example: I love visiting the Natural History Museum on 81st because of its national culture and passive activities in heritage tourism.
    7. Leisure- My Example: Bridget took full advantage of the leisure time that was offered at her job.
    8. National Park- My Example: Yellowstone and Yosemite are national parks.
    9. National Park Service- My Example: Nate helps develop idea for national parks that will provide beneficial use for the public and its future generations.
    10. National Register of Historic Places- My Example: Phil was curious to know which historical sites have made it onto the National Register of Historic Places in the United States, so he began doing research.
    11. Noncommercial Recreation- My Example: Amber volunteered at the ASPCA for spring break.
    12. Recreation- My Example: Activities that help restore strength and spirit after means of hard work.
    13. Recreation for Special Populations- My Example: Tom is part of the National Alliance on Mental Illness.
    14. Recreation Management- My Example: Meeting planning, commercial recreation, and event planning are examples of recreation management.
    15. Theme Park- My Example: Theme parks are attractions based a specific theme, which may be historical, geographical, cultural, etc. Six flags is a theme park, based on the characters from LooneyToons.
    16. Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT)- My Example: After Lisa’s stay at the hotel, she reviewed her hotel bill and noticed the different taxes she was charged throughout her stay.
    17. Voluntary Organizations- My Examples: During the summer Gilbert works at the YMCA for summer camp.

    Reply
  56. Victoria A. Gaston

    Victoria Gaston
    Professor Damien Duchamp
    HMGT1101

    Chapter Summary

    Chapter eleven focuses on the international growth within the casino industry. The chapter talks about how it is important to focus on the relationship between the casino and the other operating departments within the resort, when management is able to operated both they casino can do well. Casino gambling is also discussed in the chapter, it is put into two sections, social gambling and mercantile gambling; according to the text, state governments strictly regulate casino gambling and the regulations developed over time will help the casino stay in business.

    1. Baccarat- My Example: Seth played baccarat while visiting Vegas. He won due to his hand being closest to nine.
    2. Blackjack- My Example: Vic lost a game of blackjack due to his hand being way less than 21, and the dealers hands equaling 21.
    3. Casino Resort- My Example: Casino resorts offer overnight stays, games/gambling, recreational activities, etc.
    4. Comp- My Example: Ryan suggested a glass of sparkling wine that a guest may like; though the guest took his suggestion they did not like the wine. Instead of charging the guest for the wine, Ryan was able to comp the wine and give the guest a different wine they enjoyed.
    5. Craps- My Example: Table game play at Casinos all around.
    6. Gambling- My Example: While visiting Atlantic City, Mr. & Mrs. Smith hit a few lucky streaks while gambling over the weekend.
    7. Handle- My Example: Anthony’s handle was $150 a game.
    8. Hold Percentage- My Example:
    9. Poker- My Example: You’ll always catch grandpa playing online poker when he’s bored.
    10. Roulette- My Example: Andy lost the last of his money in a game of roulette.
    11. Win- My Example: The money the casino keeps from bets placed on games.

    Reply
  57. clotilda

    Clotilda Hamilton
    HMGT 1101
    Prof. D. Duchamp

    Chapter 10: Recreation, Attractions and Clubs

    In this chapter I learnt the difference between Recreation an leisure. Recreation is fun activities you do that includes your day to day and leisure is time spent away from work. I also learnt about government sponsored recreation like , Libraries, zoos, museums and national parks. I learned the difference between commercial and non commercial recreation. Commercial means profitable and non commercial non profitable.
    Keywords and concepts:
    1. City Clubs. NYSC, You can receive a free month membership at NYSC when you get the New York State ID

    2. Club Management: A group of people or person in responsible for the smooth running of the club

    3. Commercial Recreation. Based on profit. Disney world

    4. Country Clubs. Members only clubs. Working at a country -club may be very demanding, but if you have the patience you can make a lot of money and contacts

    5. Government-sponsored Recreation. Museums, libraries, zoos. Government-sponsored

    6. Heritage Tourism. In St.Lucia we have many Heritage tours to offer. You can see how we cooked inside the ground.

    7. Leisure. I don’t have to work for three days after Christmas, I’m gonna stay home and relax

    8. National Park. African Burial Ground National Monument

    9. National Parks Services. Tennis courts

    10. National Register of Historic Places. Places of historic significance worth preserving

    11. Noncommercial Recreation. To raise money within a group for travel…, for a member. Non profit

    12. Recreation. My friends and I play tennis every sunday

    13. Recreation for special populations. Special olympics

    14. Recreation Management. Person or persons in charge of events

    15. Theme Parks: themed based parks. You know what their main focus is, for example, water world

    Reply
  58. gaozhigang

    Chapter 13 summary-Zhigang Gao

    Chapter thirteen focuses on special events. Today,this industry growing fast that need more professional special events planners and managers. The author describes the responsibility of events planner and managers, also explains the process of the event-planning. In addition, author point out this industry require the special event planners have critical skills and abilities also know how to use technology tools manage special events.
    Key words:
    1.charity balls-my example:While living in London beforemoving to the U.S. last year, she attended charity balls and worked at Barclays Bank PLC.
    2.conventions:My example-New York Convention is one of the key instruments in international arbitration.
    3.coordination-my example:The events planner have different opinions about where to held the meeting finally they through consultation and coordination solve the divergence.
    4.corporate events-my example:They also host regular corporate events, such as product launches for big brand names such as Japanese cosmetics company Shiseido.
    5.corporate seminars-my example:The hotel zone included about 30 projects, including a 67-room Hotel Amara ‘urban resort, ‘ with an executive wing with space for corporate seminars.
    6.event planner-my example:Delong Cao, a 33-year-old event planner in Beijing, is an active Internet user.
    7.event planning-my example:The volunteer work stood out because Nacy resume described the event planning experience and how many attendees were involved, making it clear that it was a substantial amount of responsibility.
    8.fairs and festivals-my example :For a fantastic introduction to the world of truffles, Italy is packed with truffle fairs and festivals in October and November.
    9.International Festival & Events Association (IFEA)-my example:IFEA’s 60th Anniversary Convention & Expo held on September 21-23, 2015 in Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A.
    10.International Special Events Society (ISES)-my example:ISES Portland Events. In the lunch meeting, they will explore Design, Rental and Lighting Trends with leaders in the industry.
    11.Meeting Professionals International (MPI)-my example: since 1984,the MPI Foundation has invested more than $10 million in visionary research and education.
    12.Social functions-my example:The conversations, meetings, social functions, and interactions that are not organic in my day.
    13.special events industry-my example :if we interested in special events industry we should think about getting degree in these fields, or the related fields of hospitality and marketing.
    14.trade shows-my example:Emporia is a company I’ve come across at various mobile phone tradeshows promoting its easy-to-use handsets.
    15.wedding and holiday parties-my example:everybody need dress up if attend wedding and holiday parties.
    16.workshops-my example: the Japanese chef come to Anna Nurse workshops share her expertise with our hospitality management students.

    Reply
  59. gaozhigang

    Chapter 14 summary – Zhigang Gao

    Chapter fourteen focuses on leadership and management , the author describes good leaders should inspire follows to satisfy their desire, therefore,leaders must balance results and relationships. Leadership means responsibility. This chapter also discusses the six key management functions: planning,organizing,decision making and the forth. At the end, the author point out the difference between management and leadership.
    Key words:
    1. Communication-my example : Susan’ boss lack of communication with her, didn’t know she needs take care baby always let her work overtime. So she quit the job. This example told us communication is very important.
    2.controlling-my example:Cantor has a large piece of digital-era trading, too, by dint of controllingpublicly traded eSpeed.
    3.decision making-my example:Those of us who like to see transparency in all decision makingwould like to have all the photos released.
    4.effectiveness-my example:The researchers also looked at the effectiveness of airport screenings in stopping the spread of the Ebola virus.
    5.efficiency-my example:The director dusted his staff down about the drop in their efficiency.
    6.ethics-my example:The foundation also started centers for the study of medical ethics at Harvard University and Georgetown University.
    7.Frontline manager -my example:The program of Apple is designed to attract talents who will be developed to frontline manager within 2 years.
    8.human resources and motivating-my example:Jose stay in A company for 10 years because this company Emphasis on technology and human resources, build a motivating mechanism for talent.
    9.leader/manager-my example:So now I get an opportunity to expand within my company and become a manager/leader. I find myself shying away and feeling nervous about the opportunity.
    10.leadership-my example:Under Linda’s leadership, the group’s budget grew from less than ten million dollars to more than one hundred thirty million.
    11.management-my example:And in other economic news, a report by the Institute for Supply Management said its non-manufacturing index shrank by less than expected.
    12.managing-my example:The Yangze River and the Han River broke out mighty inundations too, but the government merely concentrated on managing the Yellow River.
    13.middle managers-my example:Etiquette applies to all business jet passengers, but especially to middlemanagers accompany their C-level colleagues.
    14.organizing-my example:Jason had observed that students at colleges across the country had been organizing “teach-in” demonstrations to protest the war in Vietnam.
    15.planning-my example:I’m always planning but seldom carries through with any of them.
    16.top managers-my example:His top managers agreed when he asked them to roll out the healthier cuisine.
    17.transaction leadership-my example: the leader would like to take the model of transaction leadership, because he don’t trust employees.
    18.transformational leadership-my example:Yet Wikispeed can be seen as an example of transformational leadership, ultimately leading to disruptive innovation.

    Reply
  60. Daniella Martinez

    Daniella Martinez
    Prof. Duchamp
    11/30/15
    Chapter 13

    In this chapter, one is able to identify the different kinds of special events and what is required when creating a one. There are also different kinds of organizations and associations involved with the special events industry. Being able to coordinate certain events as well as planning them also take up challenge and require certain tools to control them. It’s not an easy task and there are certain skills and abilities required to become an event manager.

    1) Charity balls: Janice wanted to raise funds for her cancer awareness program, so she conducted a charity ball.

    2) Conventions: Hector attended a convention at the Northern Star hotel.

    3) Coordination: In order to keep things running smooth, Leyla wanted to assure coordination of her plans.

    4) Corporate Events: The Acme corp. decided to host a meeting at the Crowne Plaza hotel.

    5) Corporate Seminars: For further training the L.E.I. corp. conducted a seminar at the Marriot hotel.

    6) Event Planner: For Maya’s wedding, her sister arranged a venue with the help of an event planner.

    7) Event planning: Maya’s wedding had to come out perfect , so beforehand the event planner had to conduct a series of different outcomes.

    8) Fairs and Festivals: A festival took place in 34th St. and the hotels nearby raised their room rack rates to increase revenue.

    9) I.F.E.A- Janice wanted to attend the Bali spirit festival in Indonesia.

    10) I.S.E.S.- Special events occur spontaneously, and since the birdsville races only occur rarely, Jayson wanted to travel to Australia there for the summer.

    11) Social Functions: Tim planed a party for Bastille day to celebrate with his friends.

    12) Special Events Industry: In the special events market special events consultants requires a balance of many different skills.

    13) Trade shows: MAC conducted a trade show to promote their new lipstick line.

    14) Wedding and Holidays Parties: Michelle decided it’d be nice if she got married in December to give her wedding a winter theme.

    15) Workshops: The hospitality industry conducts seminars and workshops to provide training and development programs.

    Reply
  61. Kunle Kernizan

    HMGT 1101
    Kunle Kernizan

    Chapter 13

    The thirteenth chapter is about event planning. The chapter starts by describing what an event is and what functions that the job entails. The chapter then describes all the different functions of the job. They also describes the different organizations that help attract different events. They also talk about the idea of sustainability in the events business.

    Terms
    corporate seminars-conference for a discussion or meeting
    workshops- Meeting at which a group of people engage in intensive discussion and activity on a subject.
    Conventions- Large conference for a particular profession.
    trade shows- Exhibition at which businesses in a particular industry promote their products.
    charity balls- A party heeled by an NGO or a charity to make money for their cause.
    Fundraisers- A person whose job it is to seek financial support for an institution.
    Workshops- A meeting of people who are having a discussion about a subject or activity
    conventions- A large meeting or conference especially for a profession.
    social functions- Any gathering of people for some reason.
    weddings and holiday parties- Parties associated with a wedding or a vacation.
    event plannings- General term that refers to planning public events.
    Event planner- People who control events. They also book entertainment and hire catered.
    Co ordinations- The act of keeping the different parts of the event working in harmony.
    Corporate Events- Meeting for corporations and other similar organizations.
    Festival- A site that allows you to search fr festivals throughout the world.
    International Festival& Events Association (IFEA)- Organization for event planners to meet and exchange ideas.
    Meeting Professionals Internationals (MPI)- Group for meeting professionals to in crease their strategic value via education and training.

    Reply
  62. Arian Florez

    Arian Florez
    HMGT 1101
    Prof. Duchamp

    Chapter 13 Summary

    Chapter 13 talks about the special events industry as well as what special events are. It goes into what it is that event planners do and what the process entails for planners. It also breaks down the different kinds of events you can plan and outlines what you’d be expected to do or know to manage the event. Lastly, the chapter introduces various organizations that have to do with special event planning.

    Key Words and Concepts

    Charity Balls: A dinner- dance event held to raise money for a group or organization towards a specific issue. For example a charity ball with proceeds going to breast cancer research.

    Conventions: Basically a large business or professional meeting held in a specific place. Could include a form of trade show or exposition. For example, ComicCon

    Coordination: Putting the parts together smoothly and efficiently. Being able to put the event together with all the different elements.

    Corporate Events: Events relating to the corporate world. For example, annual meetings, sales meetings, training meetings, award ceremonies.

    Corporate Seminars: Corporate meeting whose purpose is to exchange ideas. Basically learn from one another’s success as well as failures.

    Event Planner: The people that plan things like the Thanksgiving Day parade, Comic Con, the Auto Show, NYC Marathon, and plenty of other events.

    Event Planning: The process of planning events. The hair-pulling time before the event.

    Fairs and Festivals: Events themed towards the event’s purpose. For example, a turkey float for the Thanksgiving Day Parade falls under the theme of the parade.

    International Festival & Events Association (IFEA): Basically a global association that allows for sharing of ideas and successes in fundraising, marketing, operations, etc. Build from each other’s success.

    Meeting Professionals International: Another group organized with the purpose of sharing information, techniques, and experiences.

    Social Functions: A social gathering or meeting amongst friends or colleagues. Could be used for team building.

    Special Events Industry: The industry for special events, including job opportunities, networking, and getting people together.

    Trade Shows: Used to appeal to a certain group of people. Food trade shows cater to those in the restaurant industry while a car trade show caters to the driving population.

    Weddings and Holiday Parties: Events that are centralized around celebrating something. For example, Christmas parties, New Years Parties, etc.

    Workshops: A brief intensive educational program conducted by an instructor or teacher, usually designed for small groups of people. For example, a knitting workshop, a home repair workshop, etc.

    Reply
  63. Mariama Bah

    Mariama Bah
    HMGT 1101
    Professor DuChamp
    November 30,2015

    Summary

    Chapter 13 focuses on Event Planning and all aspects of Event Planning. It tell’s us the different types of events that can be hosted, where they can be hosted and for what occasions they can be hosted for. The Chapter tell us what the event planner duties are and what they are put in place for and it tells us what or who is needed to plan an event.

    Key Words and Concepts

    1. Charity Balls: Michael attended the annual charity ball and this year they were raising money for st. judes hospital for children.

    2. Conventions: Comic con has a convention every year for the comic fans and they recently had one in NYC.

    3. Coordination: Edward was in charge of coordinating the annual business travel trip for his company.

    4. Corporate Events: Since jack was promoted to food and beverage manager he would now be able to experience all of the major corporate events that were held in different cities.

    5. Corporate Seminars: Roman attended the monthly corporate seminar with new ideas to help the company grow.

    6. Event Planner: Melissa hired an event planner to help plan her daughters 18th birthday.

    7. Event Planning: Hospitality management focuses on event planning and if being a chef doesn’t work out i know i can exceed in this field.

    8. Fairs and Festivals: Each year fairs and festival are held around the city to cater to each season, holiday and etc.

    9. International Festival & Events Association (IFEA): IFEA organization helps other organizations and groups plan a positive and successful fairs and festivals

    10. International Special Events Society (ISES): ISES represents special event producers from festivals to trade shows to help others.

    11. Meeting Professionals International (MPI): Laura needed CMP and CMM certification so she contacted MPI because that’s what they specialize in.

    12. Social Functions: My cousin loves to host little social functions in her house and she always assigns me to be her sous chef and baker.

    13. Special events industry: The special events industry looks for professionals who specialize in event planning and other aspects of events to provide the best experience to their clients.

    14. Trade Shows: Hilton had a huge trade show in December so they had to make sure to maximize their profits in order to gain extra revenue.

    15. Weddings and Holiday Parties: Weddings and Holiday parties are the main events that are hosted depending on seasons and locations.

    16. Workshops: Certain farmers markets hold health workshops to promote healthy eating habits and choices.

    Reply
  64. clotilda

    Clotilda Hamilton
    HMGT 1101
    Prof. Duchamp

    Chapter 1 summary
    The first chapter talks about the evolution of the hospitality industry. I learned that hospitality comes from the the french word “hospice” meaning to provide care and shelter. I also learned in this chapter that the French Revolution in 1789-1799 helped change the course of culinary history. I learned about the terms used in hospitality like FOH .

    Key Words and Concepts

    1. Corporate Philosophy: Staff and guests alike will be treated with utmost respect at all times

    2. Empowerment: I feel as the chef, I don’t have to go to the manager to make decisions for me. I’m feel like my own boss

    3. Front of the house: The waitress was very attentive to us and made sure she didn’t interrupt me whilst I had food in my mouth.

    4. Goal: Return customers and referrals

    5. Guest Satisfaction: We have to make sure that all guests are happy, because we want them to return and also refer people to us

    6. Heart of the house: At Mayfield Restaurant in Brooklyn the heart of the house is front and center so the guests can see their food being prepared

    7. Hospitality: When my friend comes to visit from St.Lucia, I try to make her feel at home so I make sure I have all organic foods for her.

    8. Inseparability

    9. Intangible: An experience,

    10. National Restaurant Association (NRA): The (NRA) wants to ban tipping in all NY restaurants

    11. Perishability: 10 rooms out of 20 were vacant, we can never make that money back

    12. Total Quality Management: Everything must be perfect

    13. Tourism: Tourism is the major source of income in St.Lucia

    14. Sustainability: Having a restaurant and using what grows on my farm or farms around me

    15. Return on Investment: Fingers crossed

    Reply
  65. clotilda

    Clotilda Hamilton
    HMGT
    Prof. Duchamp
    Chapter 2 Review The Hotel Business
    This chapter is all about the hotel business. It talks about the history of hotels how they evolved. It also talks about Franchising, Owners and Management companies, Investments….

    Key Words and Concepts

    1. Capital Intensive: I need to be a multi-millionare to open my own restaurant.

    2. Fair Return on Investment: Before opening a hotel I need to hire an expert to let me know if after everything considered it’s going to be profitable.

    3. Feasibility study: A study to assess my investment

    4. Direct Economic Impact: the guests who come to my resorts also patronize Shal. He own the stables in the town

    5. Indirect Economic Impact: My employees now frequent local bars and restaurants in the town

    6. Franchising: I’ve opened a small hotel with cottages at a sea side in St.Lucia. All my cottages has my signature. Its very profitable and i have 100% of return customers but my customers also travel to the rest of the Caribbean and would love to stay at my place.I don’t want to invest my own money in another resort in Bequia. So someone who wants to invest in my concept and wants my customers would pay me a percentage to mirror my concept.

    7. Management contracts: I’m a chef who bought a hotel with no knowledge of running a hotel. I hire a management crew which I give a percentage of my hotel

    8. Real Estate Investment Trust (REITs): Great investment

    9. Referral Associations: Now that I own my cottage franchise I can now advertise for both St. Lucia and Bequia. All my staff are trained the same and guests can know that the cottages share same qualities.

    10. Vacation Ownership: I buy shares to a beach house, I can stay there for 3 months out of a year

    Reply
  66. London

    HMGT 1101: Prof D. Duchamp
    By: Paulette Powell

    Chapter 13: Special Events (Summary)

    This chapter will provide the ability to identify and define special events, and how they have evolved over the decades into a multi-million dollar industry. To understand the process in its entirety. To understand the responsibilities and the skills required for an event planner/manager, and elaborate on the different associations/organizations affiliated with the special events industry.

    1. Charity Balls:
    Are great opportunities for volunteer work for; 1. Donating your time to a good cause, 2. Gaining valuable experience, 3. Knowing what it means to budget wisely, because every penny counts when non-profit organizations hold special events. But it’s oh-so-worth-it!

    2. Conventions:
    Where special types of meetings are had. Primarily formal style assemblies, with groups/individuals exchanging information and materials.

    3. Coordination:
    Is similar to a choreographer who choreographs a dance group. Whether things are running smoothly or if they’re any hiccups, when you have a motivated staff and an innovative plan, you can always get the job done. Leadership requires coordination, where the voice of reason, will lead to a great finish.

    4. Corporate Events/Seminars:
    Corporate events/seminars consist of events such as, Grand Openings, Employee Recognition Ceremonies, Product Launches, Trainings, Workshops, and Sales/Marketing Meetings. Remarkably, corporate events are at least 80% of the industry’s market.

    5. Event Planner:
    An event planner has a myriad of responsibilities. The essential personality and skills of an event planner, should be; Patience, Understanding, Negotiator, Leader, Time Management, Innovative, Budgeting Skills, and a Great Communicator.

    6. Event Planning:
    Planning an event, entails the planner to be meticulous to detail, which usually means handling everything from beginning to end, and anything in between such as; Date/Time, Venue, Marketing the event, Caterers, Entertainment and Master of ceremonies, and even the bride having dress issues. To be prepared, to foresee some of the things that could possibly go wrong with an event and being able to resolve it, is one of the key components of being a great event planner.

    7. Fairs and Festivals:
    The planner for these types of events needs to establish the theme and its meaning. Just to name a few; The Grand Central Festivals, Harlem Street Fairs, Cultural Street Fairs Meatpacking District Festival, San Janiero Festival, Carnivals, Oktoberfest, and Mardi Gras. These are events where communities can enjoy the local arts, foods, sounds, entertainments, whether it’s just you or family.

    8. International Festival & Events Association (IFEA):
    A wonderful network of global exchange for event planners to communicate ideas, issues and how to surpass what they already know in this area of the industry. IFEA established their Certification Festival & Event Executive course in 1983, for individuals to enhance, their knowledge and their commitment to excellence.

    9. International Special Events Society (ISES):
    I, myself, am looking into joining this particular association, because through the networking that I have done in the past, they have come highly recommended as an organization that I should be affiliated with that will provided me with useful services and assist in my future growth.

    10. Meeting Professionals International (MPI):
    Is a global organization, provide professionals with the tools they need to enhance and utilize their skills for future growth, in their careers or business venture. Programs such as, Certified Meeting Professional (CMP) & Certification in Meeting Management (CMM) were created for this purpose.

    11. Social Functions:
    Social events are more developed with a personal aspect in event planning. Events of this type would include, Birthday Parties, Graduations, Weddings and Anniversaries.

    12. Special Events Industry:
    Weddings are the biggest portion of social event planning, and the most detailed. Weddings can go from Elopements or DIY’s (which have the lowest budgets), to an extravagant affair costing into the millions.

    13. Trade Shows:
    Are events that are purposeful to individuals and groups who are looking to sell, exchange or promote goods & services. They are usually held at convention centers like, the Jacob Javitz Convention Center.

    14. Weddings and Holiday Parties:
    With events such as these, the details are even more arduous than most other types of events out there. You have to be mindful to specifics, such as today’s trends, pricing & color palettes, flowers, venues, and that’s just the tip of the ice berg.

    15. Workshops:
    Are more geared towards the educational side of promotion and product. With hands on activities, and knowledge exchange and enhancement, and towards of the small groups. Also great for networking, intimately connecting, exchange of ideas and working together/collaboration.

    Reply
  67. Victoria A. Gaston

    Victoria Gaston
    Professor Damien Duchamp
    HMGT1101

    Chapter Summary

    Chapter twelve focuses on conventions, meetings, and expositions and their purposes within the hospitality industry, they are beneficial in a way where there are marketing venues, member services, and networking, etc. Meetings bring people together for the exchanging of information; expositions bring people together in an environment where they can present their products and equipment; and conventions are meetings that have some form of exposition or trade show. In the chapter, it discusses the responsibilities and functions within meetings, expositions, and conventions.

    1. Associations- My Example: American Psychological Association is an association the represents psychologist in the United States.
    2. Convention- My Example: Comic Com convention is held at the Javits center every year!
    3. Convention and Visitors Bureaus (CVBs)- My Example: CVB offers local business information that can help plan their events and trips, they may also offer different packages that provide list of activities, transportation and venues for their event.
    4. Convention Center- My Example: The Javits Center in Manhattan is a popular convention center.
    5. Exposition- My Example: Emerald Exposition held a meeting to plan their next event.
    6. Familiarization (FAM) Trip- My Example: For the Santa Clause convention this year, the organizers are taking familiarizing trips throughout New York City to find the perfect location for the event.
    7. Incentive Market- My Example: The Standard Hotel offers executives and incentive market reward as holiday gifts.
    8. Meeting- My Example: Every season my manager holds a meeting for staff to update everyone on new changes in our food and beverage menus and styling of the work place.
    9. Meeting Planner- My Example: As a meeting planner I specialize in the organization and planning of business meetings and other conventional events.
    10. Meetings, Incentive Travel, Conventions and Exhibitions (MICE)- MICE are the largest growing profitable part of the tourism industry.
    11. Social, Military, Educational, Religious and Fraternal Groups (SMERF)- SMERF groups are typically paid for by the individual and budgeted so that their spendings are not outstanding.

    Reply
  68. Victoria A. Gaston

    Victoria Gaston
    Professor Damien Duchamp
    HMGT1101

    Chapter Summary

    Chapter thirteen focuses on identifying and defining the different types of special events and how they have changed over the years. It talks about the process of each event, the skills and responsibility in event planning and management, and also gives examples of associations and organizations within the special events industry.

    1. Charity Balls- My Example: The Black and White Holiday Charity Event of 2015 is on December 18th, 2015, all donations will be going towards Liberty in North Korea, to help Koreans reach safety.
    2. Convention- My Example: Meg had attended a convention at the Marriott Hotel this pass spring.
    3. Coordination- My Example: All staff on the event must follow all the event coordination’s to have a successful event.
    4. Corporate Events- My Example: Now that Nate has finished his managing training he is official a manger at his hotel, now he’s able to attend all major corporate events.
    5. Corporate Seminars- My Example: Every six months Adams job host a seminar where employees are able to bring ideas and learn new ones.
    6. Event Planner- My Example: I hired an event planner to plan my daughters birthday party.
    7. Event Planning- My Example: Back when I was in high school, I was so good at throwing parties I began to consider becoming an event planner.
    8. Fairs and Festivals- My Example: Each year in May, midtown host the Ninth Avenue Food Festival
    9. International Festival & Events Association (IFEA)- My Example: IFEA helps organizations plan eventful and successful festivals.
    10. International Special Events Society (ISES)- My Example: ISES allows members to collaborate and networking with one another.
    11. Meeting Professionals International (MPI)- My Example: Cheri wanted to get her CMP and CMM certificate, so she reached out to MPI who offers those development programs.
    12. Social Functions- My Example: My coworkers always have little events just for us employees to gather outside of work, to chill and hang out.
    13. Special Events Industry- My Example: Special events industry requires you to have years of event planning experience in order to continue to give their best clientele the best event planning experience.
    14. Trade Shows- My Example: Trade shows are events that are for individuals and groups that are looking to promote their products and/or sell their products.
    15. Weddings and Holiday Parties- My Example: Depending on the season and location, weddings and holiday parties are planned according to those two.
    16. Workshops- My Example: Before Daniel began his training for his new job he had to participate in a workshop to help develop more of his skills.

    Reply
  69. Rosa

    Rosa Chong
    Professor Damien Duchamp
    HMGT 1101

    Chapter 13 Summary:

    Chapter 13 gives a brief explanation on how events are planned and everything that event planning consists of. Everything from how things are setup to every skill necessary to be in the event planning world. This chapter explains the responsibilities of an event planner and how different corporations hosts special occasions.

    1.Charity Ball- an event hosted to show your support towards a foundation.
    2.Convention- where people come together to discuss matter or a special function
    3.Coordination- the process of how organizing people or groups into working things well
    4.Corporate Event- a business occasion held by the company
    5.Corporate Seminars- a corporation that comes together to discuss the improvements towards the company
    6.Event Planner- a person who is in charge of planning a special event
    7.Event Planning- the process of how the event planner plans the special event or occasion, every step that the event planner themselves have to go through to make sure everything goes well
    8.Fairs and Festivals- a special event where families gather together to have a great time
    9.International Festival & Events Association (IFEA)- and organization that hosts worldwide festivals and bring people together
    10.International Special Events Society (ISES)- an organization that invites people to network to plan special events
    11.Meeting Professionals International (MPI)- an organization that bring professionals to work together and improve their skills
    12.Social Functions- an event held to celebrate a special occasion
    13.Special Events Industry- in the industry corporations who seek experienced event planners to host social occasions
    14.Trade Shows- an event towards individual or group that want to promote their product
    15.Weddings and Holiday Parties- a memorable event that are hosted at a certain time or place
    16.Workshops- a small group or team that works on certain skills and may work on hands on experiments

    Reply
  70. Mariama Bah

    Mariama Bah
    HMGT 1101
    Professor DuChamp
    December 4, 2015

    Summary

    Chapter 14 focuses on Leadership and management. Leaderships is defined as the process by which a person is able to influence the activities and outcomes of others in a desired way. There is different type of leaderships contemporary leadership includes tranformational and transactional types of leadership. The Chapter also informs us of managing the different levels of managing such as Front-line manager, middle manager and top manager. The chapter also end by telling us the difference between management and leadership.

    Key Words and Concepts

    1. Communication: Communication was Ryan’s key aspect when training his crew because he feels without communication the team will lack greatly.

    2. Controlling: Controlling is the final management function without control there will be many issues.

    3. Decision Making: Decision making is very critical when it comes to running a business.

    4. Effectiveness: Effectiveness is doing the right thing or getting things done

    5. Efficiency: Efficiency is the most output from the smallest amount of input in result of doing the right thing or getting things done.

    6. Ethics: Having the standards of correct conduct and moral judgement is Ethics.

    7. Front-line managers: A front-line manager is in charge of the line employees and is also put in place to have contact with the guest.

    8. Human Resources and motivating: Maria finds her employees by keeping the morale high this is part of human resources and motivating.

    9. Leader/Manager: The leader/manager of Bareburger duties include leading and managing the group of team members one of the duties would include effective training.

    10. Leadership: Good leadership is important in running a efficient business because the respect of the employees will be very high and the motivation will be similar because everyone wants the same outcome.

    11. Management: Management sets the foundation to good leadership, perfect business and well trained and respectful employees.

    12. Managing: Lindsay was in charge of managing the work schedule for the month of December.

    13. Middle Managers: The Middle manager of Butter NYC manages the work of the first-line manager.

    14. Organizing: Organizing employee work duties is important because it make the shift easier and reduces confusion when each employee has their set of duties

    15. Planning: Planning out the target goal sales or revenue for the month gives the business an idea of how much they should aim for.

    16. Top managers: Top managers are at the top and is in charge of making organization-wide decisions.

    17. Transactional Leadership: Transactional leadership exchanges promises of rewards for performance.

    18. Transformational Leadership: Transformational leadership is a type of leadership that influences major changes in the attitude and assumptions of organization members.

    Reply
  71. London

    HMGT 1101: Prof D. Duchamp
    By: Paulette Powell

    Chapter 14: Leadership & Management (Summary)

    This chapter brings emphasize as to what it takes to be a great leader and the process within management that is needed. Understanding the inherit difference between being in leadership and management roles, and the key roles that these positions play.

    1. Communication:
    Bringing your team/staff together for (ex: daily, weekly, monthly or quarterly) monthly meetings to assess, talk and collaborate thoughts, issues & ideas. To keep your staff motivated, happy and inspired, which in turns into positive productivity.

    2. Controlling:
    Controlling is an extremely necessary process of event planning. Without the sense of order or meeting your target, you will lose sight of the objective. Checks & balances are required for effectiveness, efficiency, productivity and accuracy. This method ensures that they know what and how to do things, instead of guessing.

    3. Decision Making:
    Another key component of the event planning process. Without a vision, mission, goals and objectives, you cannot make good/sound effective decisions, which is essential to the achieve the final product.

    4. Effectiveness:
    To accomplish the purpose you set out to achieve/complete.

    5. Efficiency:
    To get as much as you can, done, whilst using the most effective manner in which to produce it. “Using your time efficiently.”

    6. Ethics:
    Moral principles or rules of how one should conduct themselves around or when dealing with a person or groups of people.

    7. Frontline Managers:
    Frontline managers, who are also known as “supervisors,” would manage/supervise their immediate subordinates, such as, “Front Office Manager”- supervises, Guest Services, Front Desk, Reservations, Concierge etc…

    8. Human Resources & Motivating:
    The staff, personnel, people who the business/organization that have hired, based on how significant or the skills they have to offer to the business. This type of personnel is what one requires to bring their ideas, excitement and motivation to the business, to enable growth for themselves, others and the organization.

    9. Leader:
    Good leaders, effective leaders are influential to their groups. They are looked upon for qualities, such as, ethics, guidance, confidence, reliable, honesty and structure.

    10. Leadership:
    An individual with the ability to lead their staff through good judgement, knowledge, innovation, Initiative, discretion, resilience, delegation and loyalty.

    11. Manager:
    Managers supervise their staff’s activities, to ensure that they operate effectively and efficient. They provide the group with the planned tasks, schedules, tools and knowledge to essentially accomplish the end goal.

    12. Management:
    The task performed by the manager. Enabling them to communicate and orchestrate the performance of their staff, for accuracy, efficiency and effectiveness.

    13. Managing:
    To ensure that there is order, and that the staff, unit/area are able to perform their task(s) with no issue or hindrance. If any issue arises, finding that resolve is a task best suited to the manager if all else fails.

    14. Middle Managers:
    The performance/task of a Middle Manager, falls between the Frontline & Top Managers. They are required to handle the short – mid range plans, and based on rank they should also be able to perform the duties of a Frontline Manager.

    15. Organizing:
    To coordinate/unify, what is necessary, to aid in the task at hand.

    16. Planning:
    To layout/outline what, when, where, how and who required to meet the end goal.

    17. Top Managers:
    Are able to perform the duties of both the Frontline & Middle Managers. They are also expected to handle the mid – long range plans required to meet the final goal.

    18. Transactional Leadership:
    Is a process used to entice your staff to perform certain tasks or meets a desired goal within a specific time frame, with the outcome of receiving a reward in return.

    19. Transformational Leadership:
    This is a show of great leadership, when your leader is able to elicit your perform to go from good, to exceptional. Where you as the ambitious staff member is then willing to go above and beyond, to perform the task at hand.

    Reply
  72. cecebezou

    Chapter 14 Summary
    Chapter fourteen help you understand the difference between leadership and management roles and duties. There are many types of leadership to help play roles position in the hotel industry. The chapter provides us with different levels of managing such as: front-line, middle and top managers. The different are many aspects and clarify the difference of leadership management so you can embark the business world strong
    Key Word & Concepts
    1)Communication- A leader or boss needs to have a good communication skills in order to do their job well.
    2)Controlling- Donald led a continent life before marriage should have no difficulty in controlling his several appetite to that extent.
    3)Decision Making- If the survey responses mean that people are less rational than they ought be, its opportunity for economists to teach better decision making skills.
    4)Effectiveness- Senior citizen are greater risk for dehydration than younger people because of their effectiveness by letting them know they plenty of water.
    5)Efficiency- The company’s administration staff are meeting in an effort to improve efficiency in the office.
    6)Ethics- Hospiliality is an important part of the Nigerian code of ethics.
    7)Front-line Manager- Front-line manager is a level of management to over sees one employee or a large number of employees.
    8)Human resource and motivating- Allison has worked at Bed Bath & Beyond for six years because the company is structure around human resource and motivating to help each employee to reach their goal.
    9Leaders/Manager- In a business leader and managers of ten take role of being strong and good role model for employees.
    10)Leadership- A career in administration is a good choice for Nathalie because she is so organized and has strong leadership skills
    11)Management- After year of business management, North Face relies heavily on international shipments to feed its population.
    12)Managing- I am full time mother, student and work full time yet still managing time for my studies and quality time with my close friends.
    13)Organizing- My best friend present me a trophy of appreciation for organizing her daughter sweet sixteen party.
    14)Planning – My family and I are planning to start a family once a year to the Caribbean Island to make wonderful memories.
    15)Middle Manager- American Airlines is well round business that the company has different levels of managers such as: lower manager, middle manager and top managers.
    16)Transaction Leadership- Managers always keep track of their employees and make sure they follow the tradition of transaction leadership.
    17)Top Managers- Top Managers takes control and precise role and decision to ensure the rules and regulations are enforce.
    18)Transformation Leadership- The best leaders are not the ones that issues orders; rather they use transformation leadership to adapt their organization in the face of a problem.

    Reply
  73. cecebezou

    Chapter 5 Summary
    Beverage is a type of drink especially other than water. Chapter five express the understanding and knowing alcoholic beverages. The business industry of Alcohol there is responsibility of serving the proper or correct brand and also ensure the consuming part of it acceptable to the world. Food and Desert goods deserve appropriate alcoholic beverage, you must learn different type of grapes to produce all kind of wines. It gave me clear understanding of these components beer, wines and liquors.

    Key Words & Concepts
    1)Alcoholic Beverage- At Clubs and Lounges were alcoholic beverages is served, you must be twenty-one and older to be serve the drink.
    2)Beer- Beer is chiefly brewed in Poland and the Baltic provinces.
    3) Brandy -After Tania long stressful day of work, she poured herself a glass of brandy to calm her nerves.
    4) Champagne- There will be an ample supply of champagne for the wedding guest at the reception.
    5)Cognac-Uncle Gerald always drew some cognac from the cask into a tin cannkin.
    6)Dram Shop Legislation-The government system sales of alcoholic beverage is process for approval thru dram shop legislation.
    7)Fermentation- The fermentation process for making beer takes about three to five days.
    8)Fining – Joyce Woo the United States Senate more toughen laws on shark fining is unlikely to have much impact in Hong Kong.
    9)Fortified Wines- Wines of fresh grapes are part of concept which make the fortified wines.
    10)Hops- Rabbits hops, squirrels run and ugly snakes do crawls in the woods.
    11)Inventory Controls- You should have good inventory controls so that you know where everything is when you need it at certain time.
    12)Liquor- Tom went to liquor store to buy different kind of drink to have the best Christmas party.
    13)Malt- The industries alcohloic bevergres consist of brewing, distilling and manufacturenof malt, sugar and starch.
    14)Mashing – Brianna was angry from argument with her boyfriend and mashing her face to the pillow while yelling release the angry.
    15)Must- The restaurants must be very good and pleasant because it’s always full if people.
    16)Nonalcoholic Beverges- Juice boxes, sodas and ciders are nonalcoholic beverages that can be served at teens parties.
    17)Prohibition-The importation rare wild animals to USA country is strictly prohibited.
    18)Proof- Americans only need showing proof if citizenship in order to visit Mexico.
    19)Sparkling Wines-The most well known sparkling wine is Champagne and it come from the champagne wine region of France.
    20)-Spirits- Helen love enjoying odd class of wine but never drinks spirits.
    21)Vintage- Aunt Sonia made a fantastic six full course meal followed by several glasses of vintage champagne.
    22)Wine- In Moldova, the very best wine is pressed and kept in oak barrels for many years.
    23) White Spirit- It colorless liquid to obtain petroleum and use as substitute such gin, vodka or rum.
    24)Wine and food paring – At events the cocktails hour can have crackers and cheese serve with wine on the side.
    25)Wine Tasting- My friends and I went to wine tasting paint gallery to enjoy a ladies night out.
    26)Wort- All whisky and beer are process during with component of wort to extracted to produce the perfect alcohol.
    27)Yeast- Michael’s wife always sprinkles our popcorn with yeast for added flavor and nutrition.

    Reply
  74. Daniella Martinez

    Daniella Martinez
    12/7/15
    Prof. Duchamp
    Chapter 14

    This chapter focuses on the important roles of leadership and management. In order to become a leader, one must not be shallow and recognize the abilities of the other group components. Also, It is essential that as a leader one must communicate and create an understanding of what are the goals and what are the strategies to obtain these goals. Being open minded and realizing that not everyone will agree with the same aspect as you is crucial to achieving and understanding the objectives.

    1) Communication: The only way to understand situations is to clearly communicate one’s understanding of them.

    2) Controlling: Being able to control a group is key when becoming a leader of an institution.

    3) Decision making: It becomes very crucial for a leader when creating the proper choice for its group.

    4) Effectiveness: In order to understand the effectiveness of one’s goal, one must put them to practice.

    5) Ethics: It is important to acknowledge that every culture holds their own moral principles.

    6) Efficiency: To find out the efficiency of something one must know whether it’s reached its goal limit.

    7)Frontline managers: The supervisor at McDonald’s has to make sure that everything runs smoothly.

    8) Human resources and motivating: Macy’s job requirements involve retaining the best employees and obtaining a high morale.

    9) Leader/Manager: The job of a leader or a manager is to control and understand the abilities of the groups they’re maintaining.

    10) Leadership: Leadership is a crucial management system where one must be in charge of their group’s accomplishment.

    11) Management: Managers are supposed to plan, organize and make proper decisions when deciding what’s best for their group.

    12) Managing: Sophia’s job is to make sure that the chicken that’s cooking reaches the internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

    13) Middle managers: George is in charge of establishing objectivesto meet these goals.

    14) Organizing: Jeremy was asked to organize his room in order to get rid of all the junk he no longer uses.

    15) Planning: Jenna is in charge of planning her sister’s wedding.

    16) Top Managers: Lea’s job is to establish strategies to meet the group’s goals.

    17) Transactional Leadership: Luis instructs his class with a strong tone in order to gain respect.

    18) Transformational Leadership: Kendall’s mentor is a transformational leader who believes she is capable of achieving anything if she puts dedication to it.

    Reply
  75. Ambre Farrington

    Chapter 3 Summary

    Chapter three discusses the responsibilities and importance of the various lodging departments and helps students understand the organization of hotel divisions and their respective functions. We learn to calculate potential revenue based on hotel occupancy and room rates. We also learn why the roles of guest services are crucial to the success of a company.

    1.Application Service Provider (ASP) – Using an ASP helps customers book rooms more efficiently and helps hotels fill rooms more efficiently.
    2. Average Daily Rate (ADR) – Dividing total revenue by number of rooms sold tells the daily rate average.
    3. Call Accounting Systems (CAS) – In charge of billing guests for their use of the room phone.
    4. Catastrophe Plans – Plan used to protect employees, guests and property in the case of an emergency/catastrophe.
    5. Central Reservation Office (CRO) – Office for customer reservations.
    6. Central Reservation System (CRS) – The system that houses all reservation information for the chain’s various locations.
    7. City Ledger – An account used to bill other organizations that have credit with the hotel.
    8. Concierge – An employee who provides the services of a personal assistant for guests.
    9. Confirmed Reservations – Hotels, like doctors, may call a party to confirm their reservation the day before the guests are scheduled to arrive.
    10. Cost Centers – Centers that provide a service but do not create revenue.
    11. Daily Report – A daily stats record of the performance of the hotel.
    12. Employee Right To Know – Protects employees by allowing them to know what substances they are using (ex: cleaning liquids) and whether these substances may be harmful to them.
    13. Executive Committee – Committee appointed to each branch that makes executive decisions for their division and ensures these are carried out.
    14. Global Distribution Systems (GDS) – Allow customers from all over to search and find a place to sleep for the night.
    15. Guaranteed Reservations – A hotel clerk may guarantee a reservation for a guest if they are certain rooms are or will be available.
    16. Night Auditor – In the early morning hours, the night auditor finds and corrects any accounting errors made during the day.
    17. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) – This organization dictates safety practices for the work environment and conducts inspections to make sure the operation runs according to OSHA standards.
    18. Productivity – level of production; the rate at which an employee or organization progresses in accomplishing goals.
    19. Property Management Systems (PMS) – Systems that perform some of the organizational duties of hotel clerks, such as determining future occupancy and billing guests.
    20. Revenue Management – Analyzes any raises or drops in revenue, the company’s spending habits, how to make each aspect of the organization more profitable.
    21. Revenue Centers – Centers that make a profit for the hotel, through the sale of goods and services.
    22. Revenue Per Available Room (REV PAR) – Total revenue divided by the available rooms for a given period of time.
    23. Room Occupancy Percentage (ROP) – Found by dividing the number of rooms occupied by the number of rooms available. Used to determine the hotel’s productivity.
    24. Room Rates – The price of available rooms may change depending on season, nearby events, the view, etc.
    25. Rooms Division – Housekeeping and Guest Services are under the Rooms Division of a lodging operation.
    26. Uniformed Staff – Guest Service employees normally wear uniforms so they are easily discernible to arriving guests.
    27. Yield Management – Maximizes profit through the analysis of past hotel transactions.

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  76. Ambre Farrington

    Chapter 4 Summary

    This chapter describes the job requirements of various elements of a food and beverage operation. It explains what a typical work day is like, the specific responsibilities of each department and how to maximize guest satisfaction and profit.

    1.Banquet – upscale dining for a large group of people, usually for a special event/occasion.
    2.Banquet Event Order – Describes how to set up a banquet: menu, number of guests, decorations etc.
    3.Brigade – name for the line-up of different chefs, used for high volume/fast paced events so the catering runs more timely and smoothly.
    4.Capture rate – The estimated number of guests expected for an upcoming event.
    5.Catering – Providing food and beverage services for an event.
    6.Catering coordinator – Person who coordinates the catering service.
    7.Catering event order (CEO) – same as banquet event order.
    8.Catering services manager (CSM) – Makes sure everything involving catering goes according to plan.
    9.Chef tournant – a chef capable of doing ever other chef’s job so they are able to temporarily stand in for chefs that need a break or may be MIA.
    10.Chief steward – In charge of keeping the back of the house up to code; ensures a healthy, clean work environment.
    11.Classroom-style seating – Seating set up like a classroom, good for meetings and seminars.
    12.Contribution margin – determines the profit each service/product brings in.
    13.Dinner-style room seating – set up like a dinner table, usually small round tables designed for each guest to face one another and engage in conversation.
    14.Director of catering (DOC) – responsible for exceeding the expectations of guests and in turn increases profit in the food and beverage department.
    15.Director of food and beverage – Reports to the general manager on the progress of the food and beverage operstion.
    16.Executive chef – head of the kitchen, reports to the director of food and beverage
    17.Food cost percentage – Divide the cost of the food by the food sold; shows how much food has been sold.
    18.Food sale percentage – the difference between the cost of labor and food sales.
    19.Horseshoe-style room seating – Seating arranged in a half circle around the speaker; generally used for meetings.
    20.Kitchen manager – Runs the back of the house/kitchen area.
    21.Labor cost percentage – The percentage of the overall profit that goes toward labor costs.
    22.Perpetual inventory – Inventory of items always in use/automatically ordered on a regular basis.
    23.Pilferage – Stealing goods from your place of work. Under serving or over serving customers may also be considered stealing.
    24.Pour-cost percentage – The cost of beverages served.
    25.Responsible acoholic beverage service – Serving alcohol responsibly, ie. Not serving to minors, IDing guests when necessary, refusing service to guests who are incapacitated.
    26.Restaurant manager – Manages the restaurant.
    27.Room service – Services guests in their rooms, usually food and drink.
    28.Shopper – Undercover investigator posing as a regular customer in order to assess whether an operation is running according to standards.
    29.Sous chef – Second in command and reports to the head chef.
    30.Station chef – A chef confined to one area of food preparation/production. They focus on a specific food item or food group temporarily.
    31.Theater-style room seating – seating arranged similar to a theater audience.

    Reply
  77. Ambre Farrington

    Chapter 10 Summary

    This chapter is about the different types of recreation (commercial vs non-commercial), the various attractions we have throughout the US (theme parks, clubs, museums, theaters, national parks…) and the difference between recreational activities and leisurely activities and why each are essential to our health and wellness in an age of growing stresses and burnout.

    1.City clubs – clubs for recreation (sports, meetings, schools etc.)
    2.Club management – management duties of clubs; fees, maintenance, budgets, customer service.
    3.Commercial recreation – profitable recreation
    4.Country clubs – social clubs (golf and other activities) that charge high membership fees to ensure a certain clientele.
    5.Government-sponsored recreation – recreation funded by gov’t taxes: libraries, zoos, museums.
    6.Heritage tourism – tourism centered around historical sites.
    7.Leisure – Time off to do whatever you like.
    8.National park – “Grand national playgrounds”; Yellowstone National Park.
    9.National parks service – founded by congress to preserve the park’s resources for future generations.
    10.National Register of Historic Places – A list of registered historic sites.
    11.Noncommercial recreation – not for profit recreation
    12.Recreation – activities we engage in, in our free time to enhance wellness and quality of life.
    13.Recreation for special populations – recreational activities provided for specific groups that may need something extra.
    14.Recreation management – the management of recreational sites/activities.
    15.Theme parks – Recreational parks with a theme, ex: water parks.
    16.Transient occupancy tax (TOT) – tax paid for staying in city hotels.
    17.Voluntary organizations – Not for profit, nongovernmental organizations that serve the public.

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  78. Ambre Farrington

    Chapter 11 Summary

    This chapter describes how casinos operate, the different kinds of operations and how/why their importance to the hospitality industry has grown from its inception in ancient times to modern day hotels and resorts. Casinos have become a large part of the industry and offer most aspects of hospitality.

    1.Baccarat – table game for which the goal is to have a hand close to nine.
    2.Blackjack – game played with the dealer, whoever gets closest to twenty one without going over wins.
    3.Casino resort – a resort centered around its casinos.
    4.Comp – complimentary goods and services offered to the consumer to keep their business.
    5.Craps – game played by making wagers on the outcome of rolled dice.
    6.Gambling – placing a bet on the outcome of something.
    7.Handle – The amount a player bets.
    8.Hold percentage – percentage of the handle that the casino keeps for itself.
    9.Poker – card game in which participants play against one another instead of playing against the casino.
    10.Roulette – a game consisting of a wheel and ball. Players bet on where the ball will fall when the wheel stops.
    11.Win – the player’s winnings after the casino’s percentage is taken out.

    Reply
  79. Ambre Farrington

    Chapter 13 Summary

    This chapter describes what qualifies as a special event, who is in charge of creating and managing such events and what skill set is needed to fill this position. It also lists professional organizations and associations within the field.

    1.Charity balls – events held to raise money for a charity.
    2.Conventions – conference events.
    3.Coordination – organizing all elements of event so each part of the show is in sync.
    4.Corporate events – events/meetings for corporations.
    5.Corporate seminars – corporate meetings for workers to exchange ideas.
    6.Event planner – a person who plans an event from top to bottom.
    7.Event planning – the process of planning an event.
    8.Fairs and festivals – community events with a theme, ex: Mardi Gras
    9.International Festival & Events Association (IFEA) – an organization designed to help event planners through the process of planning festivals and events.
    10.International Special Events Society (ISES) – networking group for event planners involved in special events.
    11.Meeting Professionals International (MPI) – organization for professionals to meet and exchange ideas.
    12.Social functions – a slightly less formal event, like a birthday party.
    13.Special events industry – The field of event planning that encompasses more grandiose events.
    14.Trade shows – a show held for businesses to promote and demonstrate their product/service.
    15.Weddings and holiday parties – events with themes that are heavily dependent on location and time of year.
    16.Workshops – promotion of goods and services that are more informative.

    Reply
  80. Kesso Diallo

    Kesso Diallo

    Chapter 11 :

    The text begins by informing the reader of the increasing global prominence of the the casino industry and the unique way it combines gambling with a traditional hospitality experience. Then goes to delineate the particular relationship between a casino and the other department of a resort operation. The author reaffirms the centrality of the gambling to these enterprises, and how guest service is oriented towards facilitating the aforementioned gambling. In addition, the chapter explains the way in which these operations, in contrast to most hospitality operations, provide their guest with a wide variety of complementary goods and services.

    Baccarat : A traditional game in which the winning hand totals closest to nine.

    BlackJack : A table game in which the winning hand is determined by whether the dealer or the player gets cards that add up to a number closest to or equal to 21 without going over.

    Casino resort : A hotel that combines accommodations with gambling.

    Camp : are complimentary goods and services offered to casino patrons in order to attract their business.

    Craps : A dice game in which the player make ways on the outcome of the rolls of a pair of dice.

    Gambling : The act of placing stakes on an unknown outcome with the possibility of securing a gain it the bettor guesses correctly.

    Handle : The dollars wagered or bet; often confused with win. Whenever a customer places a bet , the handle increases by the amount of the bet. The handle is not affected by the outcome of the bet.

    Hold percentage : is the percentage of the total handle that is retained as win.

    Poker : A card game in which participants play against each other instead of the casino.

    Roulette : A traditional table game in which a dealer spins a wheel and players wager on which number a small ball will fall.

    Win : Dollars won by the gaming operation from its customers . The net spending at customers on gaming is called the win also known as ( ggr ).

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  81. Kesso Diallo

    Kesso Diallo

    Chapter 12 :

    This chapter focuses on conventions, meetings, and expositions and their purposes within the hospitality industry, they are beneficial in a way where there are marketing venues, member services, and networking, etc. It discusses the responsibilities and functions within meetings, expositions, and conventions.

    Associations : Go back many centuries to the middle ages or earlier. The guilds in Europe were created during the middle ages to secure proper wages and maintain work standards.

    Convention : a generic term referring to any size business or professional meeting held in one specific location, which usually includes some form of trade show or exposition. Also refers to a group of delegates or members who assemble to accomplish a specific goal.

    Convention and Visitors bureaus : an organizational responsible for promoting tourism at the regional and local level.

    Convention center : A large meeting place.

    Familiarization trip: A free or reduced -price trip given to travel agents , travel writers , or other intermediaries to promote destinations.

    Incentive market : of mice continues to experience rapid growth as meeting planners and travel agents organize incentive travel programs for corporate employees to reward them.

    Meeting : A gathering of people for a common purpose.

    Meeting Planner : an individual who coordinates every detail of meetings and conventions.

    Meeting incentive travel conventions and exhibitions : MICE

    Social , military , educational , religious and fraternal groups : SMERF

    Reply
  82. Kesso Diallo

    Kesso Diallo

    Chapter 13 :
    Describes what qualifies as a special event, who is in charge of creating and managing such events and what skill set is needed to fill this position. It also lists professional organizations and associations within the field.

    Charity balls : a gala dinner dance event whose purpose is to raise funds toward a group charity .

    Convention : a generic term referring to any size business or professional meeting held in one specific location, which usually includes some form of trade show or exposition. Also refers to a group of delegates or members who assemble to accomplish a specific goal.

    Coordinations : The process can be compared to a director leading band.

    Corporate events : annual meetings , sales meeting , new product launches, training meeting , workshops, management meetings, press meetings and award ceremonies .

    corporate seminars : A corporate meeting whose purpose is to exchange ideas ; conference.

    Event planner : An individual who is responsible for planning an event start to finish.

    Event planning : A general term that refers to a career path in a growing field of special events .

    Fairs and festivals : community events with a theme, ex: Mardi Gras

    International Festival & Events Association (IFEA) : an organization designed to help event
    planners through the process of planning festivals and events.

    International Special Events Society (ISES) : networking group for event planners involved in special events.

    Meeting Professionals International (MPI): organization for professionals to meet and exchange ideas.

    Social functions: a slightly less formal event, like a birthday party.

    Special events industry: The field of event planning that encompasses more grandiose events.

    Trade shows : a show held for businesses to promote and demonstrate their product/service.

    Weddings and holiday parties : events with themes that are heavily dependent on location and time of year.

    Workshops: promotion of goods and services that are more informative.

    Reply
  83. Kesso Diallo

    Kesso Diallo

    Chapter 14 Summary

    Helps you understand the difference between leadership and management roles and duties. There are many types of leadership to help play roles position in the hotel industry. The chapter provides us with different levels of managing such as: front-line, middle and top managers. The different are many aspects and clarify the difference of leadership management so you can embark the business world strong.

    Communication: The only way to understand situations is to clearly communicate one’s understanding of them.

    Controlling: Being able to control a group is key when becoming a leader of an institution.

    Decision making: It becomes very crucial for a leader when creating the proper choice for its group.

    Effectiveness: In order to understand the effectiveness of one’s goal, one must put them to practice.

    Ethics: It is important to acknowledge that every culture holds their own moral principles.
    Efficiency: To find out the efficiency of something one must know whether it’s reached its goal limit.

    Frontline managers: The supervisor at any company has to make sure that everything runs smoothly.

    Human resources and motivating: Macy’s job requirements involve retaining the best employees and obtaining a high morale.

    Leader/Manager: The job of a leader or a manager is to control and understand the abilities of the groups they’re maintaining.

    Leadership: Good leadership is important in running a efficient business because the respect of the employees will be very high and the motivation will be similar because everyone wants the same outcome.

    Management: Management sets the foundation to good leadership, perfect business and well trained and respectful employees.

    Managing: Lindsay was in charge of managing the work schedule for the month of December.
    Middle Managers: The Middle manager of Butter NYC manages the work of the first-line manager.

    Organizing: Organizing employee work duties is important because it make the shift easier and reduces confusion when each employee has their set of duties
    Planning: Planning out the target goal sales or revenue for the month gives the business an idea of how much they should aim for.

    Top managers: Top managers are at the top and is in charge of making organization-wide decisions.

    Transactional Leadership: Transactional leadership exchanges promises of rewards for performance.

    Transformational Leadership: Transformational leadership is a type of leadership that influences major changes in the attitude and assumptions of organization members

    Reply
  84. clotilda

    Clotilda Hamilton
    Chapter 14 review
    Prof. D. Duchamp

    Summary
    In this chapter, I learned the characteristics of practices of leaders and managers. A leader is anyone who knows what they want and why the want it and is capable of communicating those desires to others to gain their cooperation and support. Manager is a title. I should strive to be a great leader than just a manager. I also learned of the key management functions which are; planning, organizing, decision making, communicating, human resources and motivating, and controlling.

    KEY WORDS AND CONCEPTS
    1. Communication: making sure both parties know what the others vision is
    2. Controlling: final management function that brings everything full circle.
    3. Decision making: key management function
    4. Efficiently: Getting the most done with very little input.
    5. Ethics: set of moral principles
    6. Frontline managers: lowest level manager/ supervisors
    7. Human resource and motivating.
    8. Leader/manager:
    9. Leadership:
    10. Management
    11. Managing: planning, organizing and making decisions
    12. Middle mangers: who the supervisor reports to
    13. Organizing: decides who, what and how tasks will be done
    14. Planning: setting goals
    15. Top manager: Making medium to long term plans
    16. Transactional leadership: our team leader John promised us the weekend off if we finished the project a day before deadline.
    17. Transformational leadership: Wow. John can get us to do anything with us complaining.

    Reply
  85. Erick T

    Erick Tecuatl
    Chapter 14

    Summary
    This chapter provides us with in depth differentiation between the various roles and duties that managers have. The chapter describes the main difference between leadership and management, as well has the main management duties. These include good skills in decision making, communication, controlling and having great conceptual skills. The manager should have a figurehead role, leader role, liaison role, and spokesperson role.

    1. Communication-the ability to speak with others, efficiently.
    2. controlling-the process of monitoring activies and ensuring that that they are being accomplished
    3. decision making-the ability to resolve a task quickly and correctily.
    4. effectiveness- how efficient something is
    5. efficiency- getting the most output from the smallest amount of inputs; referred to doing things right
    6. ethics- the study of standards of conduct and moral judgement;, also the standards of correct conduct
    7. frontline managers- a low level supervisor or manager that manages the work of line employees and has guest contact.
    8. human resources and motivating- the individual who manages and develops the company’s employees and their benefits program and monitors compliance with laws that relate to equal opportunity in hiring and promotion.
    9. leader/manager-a person who works with and through other people by coordinating their efforts to achieve organizational goals.
    10. leadership-
    11. management-the process of coordination work activities so that an organizations objectives are achieved efficiently and effectively with and through other people
    12. managing- the process of management
    13. middle managers-a manager between thefirst line level and the top level of the organization who manages the work of first line managers.
    14. organizing-the structure or arrangement of related or connected items
    15. planning-the process of defining the organiaztions goals, establishing an overall strategy for achieving those goals, and developing a comprehensive set of plans to integrate and coordinate organizational work.
    17.top managers-a manager at or near the top level of the organization who is responsible for making organization wide decisions and establishing the goals and plans that affect the entire organization.
    18, transaction leadership-a type of leadership that focuses on accomplishing the tasks at hand and on maintaining good working relationships by exchanging promises of rewards for performance.
    19. transformational leadership- a type of leadership that involves influencing major changes in the attitudes and assumptions of organization members and building commitment for the organizations mission, objectives and strategies.

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  86. Erick T

    Chapter 13
    Summary:
    Chapter 13 describes and defines special events, and as well what to what event planners do. There are different types of special events such as corporate events, association events, charity balls and fundraising events social functions such as weddings, fairs and festivals, and concerts and sporting events. The chapter also talks about the different challenges that may occur for event planners, and different ways they can go about planning events.

    1. charity balls- a gala dinner- dance event whose purpose is to raise funds toward a group or charity
    2. conventions- a generic tewrm referring to any size business or professional meeting held in one specific location, which usually includes some form of trade show or exposition. Also refers to a group of delegates or members who assemble to accomplish a specific goal.
    3. coordination- the process of accomplishing something with some level of accuracy.
    4. corporate events- annual meetings, sales meetings, new product launches, training meetings, workshops, management meetings, press meetings, incentive meetings, and awards ceremonies.
    5. corporate seminars- a corporate meetings whos purpose is to exchange ideas; a conference.
    6. event planner- an individual who is responsible for planning an event from start to finish. duties include setting the date and location; advertising the event and providing refreshments or arranging catering services; and arranging speaks and or entertainment,
    7. event planning- a general term that refers to a career path in the growing field of special events
    8. fairs and festivals- planned events that are often themeed to the celebrations purpose.
    9. international festival and events association- an organization that provides an opportunity for even managers from around thew world to network and exchange ideas on how other festivals excel in sponsorship marketing fund raising, operations, volunteer coordination, and management.
    11. meetings professionals international-a Dallas bases association with nearly 19,000 members, MPI offers professional development in two certifications programs; certified meeting professional and certification in meetings management.
    12. social functions- events that include weddings, engagement parties and holiday functions.
    13. special events industry- an industry that employs professionals who work together to provide a broad range of services to create what is termed a special event
    14. trade shows- a large display of products and services available for purchase, promoting information exchange among trade people. trade shows frequently take place in convention centers where space is rented in blocks of 10 square feet. also called exposition.
    15. weddings and holiday parties- of all social gatherings, weddings are the mos widely recognized social event.
    16. workshops- usually a brief, intensive educational program conducted by a facilitator or a trainer, designed for a relatively small group of people, that focuses especially on techniques and skills in particular field. Emphasizes interaction and exchange of information among a relatively small number of participants.

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  87. Kunle Kernizan

    Kunle Kernizan
    HMGT 1101
    chp1 and 2

    The first chapter describes the history of hospitality starting in ancient Egypt and Sumer. They also describe the hotels of Ancient Greece and Rome and how important they were for merchants and other travelers because they needed people who would help house and feed them during long trips between cities. They also describe how the Emperor Charlemagne built several inns to help pilgroms traveling to different sites. They also describe the coffee houses of the Renaissance and how they became important places for knowledge to be shared. They also describe the history of American hotels starting with Jamestown Virginia and Bowling Green New York City and how the French Revolution created the first restaurants because a man named Boulanger sold soup to rioters and how the chefs and servers that worked for the French nobles had to move to New York and New Orleans to find work. They even changed the name of hospitality facilities from inns and taverns to the French word hotel. They also explain all the developments of the nineteenth and twentieth century and how modern hotels work.
    Corporate philosophy-The ideas that a corporation functions by.
    Empowerment- Empowerment is when a company gives its employees power.
    front of the house- Area of restaurant or hotel open to public.
    Goal- An object of a persons or groups ambition.
    guest satisfaction- Making sure to make a guests at an establishment are happy with what your establishment.
    heart of the house- Place where all the work is done in a restaurant.
    Hospitality- The industry of feeding and housing customers.
    Inseparability- The property of something be intrinsically connected to something else.
    Intangible- Something that has no physical property.
    national restaurant association- Organization that controls the restaurant industry.
    total quality management-
    tourism-The travel industry.
    Sustainability- Property of businesses not damaging the environment.
    return n investment- The amount of money that an investment brings back to the people who put money into it.
    The second chapter describes how the hotel business works. It starts by describing the years that certain hotels and business were started. They describe how different types of hotels work franchise, indie, and company rental properties. It also describes how the companies influence the local economies that they are located in. They also describe how the different types of hotel and resorts work.
    Capital intensive- Amount of fixed or real capital present in relation to other things like production and labor.
    fair return on investment- Return that conforms to the rate of similar investment.
    feasibility study- Is trying to figure out how likely a specific idea will succeed.
    direct economic impact- Are how a business’s existence influences people who work there.
    indirect economic impact- The influences a company has on other companies that might be connected to them and to people in the community that profit indirectly from the community.
    Franchising- Creating other locations for a restaurant or store that uses the same layouts and sell the same products.
    management contracts- Contracts that help control franchised building.
    real estate investment trusts- Companies that own real estate for the purpose of making money.
    referral association- Association that refers customers to other partners in its group.
    vacation ownership- Offers consumers option to purchase fully furnished vacation accommodations.

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  88. Kunle Kernizan

    Kunle kernizan
    chp5

    This chapter describes how alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks are sold. It starts by describing how wine is made and then how it different types of wines are categorized. They also describe the history of wine and how people have advanced in how they flavor store and ferment it. They also describe how wine and food is are paired. They also describe how the wines aroma and taste are compared with other foods. They also describe the different wine growing countries. They describe beer in a similar way the wine describing different areas were it is made, how it is made, what is made of, and innovation in its productions over the five millenniums of its use. They also describe spirits such as rum and whiskey in a similar way. And then water, soda, tea ,coffee, energy drinks, and juice.
    Vocab
    alcoholic beverage- A drink with an alcohol content
    beer- A drink made of fermented grain usually barley and flavored with hops.
    Brandy-A types of distilled wine usually 35-60% alcohol.
    Champagne- Sparkling wine from a specific region of France.
    Cognac-A type of bendy from the Cognac region of France.
    Dran shop legislation-Are American laws that control how alcohol is sold.
    Fermentation-the chemical process in which sugar breakdown into ethanol.
    Fining- A substance used to clarify beer and wine.
    Fortified wine- Wine with a distilled spirits added
    hops- A plant used to flavor beer.
    Inventory control- The system for keeping track of how much of product is in stock.
    Liquor- Alcoholic drinks usually distilled spirits.
    Malt- germinated grain soaked in water.
    Must- Grape juice used for wine.
    Nonalcoholic beverage- Drinks that do not high enough levels of alcohol to make someone drunk.
    Prohibition- Usually a set of laws that stop alcohol fro being sold, made, or distributed, usually it refers to that systems in the 1920s in the USA.
    Proof- Strength of distilled alcohol.
    Sparkling wine- Wine that has carbonated and fizzes when it is opened.
    Spirit- beverage produced by distilling.
    Vintage- Year or place in which wine was made.
    White wine- wine made from non colored parts of grapes.
    Wine- alcoholic beverage made from fruits, usually grapes.
    Wine and food pairing- the process of drinking the right types of wine with the right type of food.
    Wine tasting- a party were people sip small amounts of wine and then spits them out to see what they taste like.
    Wort-Sweet infusion of ground malt before fermentation used in beer and distilled spirits.
    Yeast- A small animal that’s digestive system breakdown starch and sugar into alcohol.

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  89. Kunle Kernizan

    Kunle kernizan
    chp6

    Chapter six describes how the restaurant industry works. It describes what classical cuisine is and what the different trends in cuisine are. They also describe culinary practices and the restaurant market. It also describes how celebrities get connected to restaurants.
    Vocab
    actual market share- Percentage of a market that is controlled by a single entity.
    Ambiance- Character or atmosphere of a place.
    Atmosphere- The feeling a place
    casual dinning-restaurant that sells moderately priced food in a casual atmosphere.
    Catchment area- Part of a town that is used for services.
    Celebrity owned restaurant- A restaurant that owned or partially owned by a famous person that usually uses there fame for advertising.
    Chain restaurant- A restaurant with several locations usually as a franchise.
    Contribution margin- Fraction of sales used to offset fixed costs.
    Culinary arts- The study of making food.
    Dinner house restaurant- a restaurant connected to a hotel or amusement park.
    Ethnic restaurant- A restaurant that sells food from a certain culture.
    Fair market share- Estimate of market value of a property.
    Family restaurant- A restaurant run by a family.
    Fine dining- A high end restaurant that has customers where suits while dining.
    Food cost %- The amount of the price of a food item goes to paying off the ingredients.
    Fusion- A mixture of different types of foods.
    Haute fusion- Combination of high end French food and some other kind food.
    Independent restaurant- A restaurant that is owned on is not a franchise or controlled by a corporation.
    Mother sauces- Five different sauces that make up all the different types of sauces used in classical cuisine.
    Niche- Some activity that a restaurant does very well eg catering to soldiers or computer scientist.
    Nouvelle cuisine- Modern style of cuisine that avoids rich heavy foods and focuses on freshness of ingredients and presentation.
    Puree- Something that has been mixed into a paste by a blender.
    Quick serve- Anther name for fast food.
    Roux- Flour and fat cooked together to make a sauce thickener.

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  90. Kunle Kernizan

    Kunle Kernizan
    chp3

    CHP3 describes how the different departments of the modern hotels work. It describes what the general manager of a hotel does on a day to day basis. They describe what an executive committee is and what it does. They describe the different room divisions and what they do and how they work. It describes how the front office works and the different jobs that are a part of this division. They also describe the nigh auditor’s job. They also describe the equations that are used to figure out the profit that a hotel can make over a period of time. They also describe how the billing system and security and amenities work in the hotel. They also describe how reservations and special requests work and bellhops work. They also describe how the concierge and housekeeping work.
    vocab
    Application service provider-delivers a complete booking booking system tied to the hotel’s inventory in real time via the internet.
    average daily rate- Operating ratio that divides dollar sales by rooms rented.
    call accounting systems- System that tracks guest room phone charges.
    catastrophe plans-A plan to maximize guest and property safety in dangerous event.
    central reservation office- The central office of a lodging company where reservation are processed.
    central reservation system- A computer system the hotel chains use to
    city ledger – All the folios that are not from guests of the hotel.
    Concierge- A hotel worker that usually helps the customers by helping them with special requests.
    confirmed reservations- A reservation made by a guest that is confirmed by the hotel fir dates they plan to stay.
    cost centers- Centers that cost money is operate but do not make money.
    daily report- Is the daily breakdown of how much money the property is making.
    employee right to know- Per US Senate Bill 198 information about chemicals must be made available to all employees.
    executive committee- A committee of AL the heads of the departments of a hotel.
    global distribution systems- a service that distributes services around the world.
    guaranteed reservation-If rooms are available on guest demand the guarantees the guests rooms on those days.
    night auditor- The individual who verifies and balances guest accounts
    OSHA- Government organization that sets rules for employee safety.
    Productivity-The amount of something that employees create.
    property management systems- A computer system that monitors everything that the goes on in the hotel.
    revenue management- Management of revenue.
    revenue centers- Places that create revenue
    revenue per available room- Revenue for period divided by total rooms available during a period.
    room occupancy percentage- Number of rooms by the number of rooms available.
    room rates- Various rates charged for hotel rooms.
    rooms divisions- The department that make up the room division.
    uniformed staff- Front of the house staff.
    yield management- The practice of analyzing past reservation patterns room rates cancellations and no shows in an attempt to maximize profits and occupancy rates and to set the most competitive room rates.

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  91. Kunle Kernizan

    Kunle Kernizan

    cp4
    Chapter four is about the dinning room and how that part of the hotel works. It describes how the dinning room manager runs kitchens, restaurants and bars. It also describes how the kitchen/ restaurant’s hierarchy works. It also describes the day of a restaurant manager and the responsibilities of someone with that job. It also describes how kitchens are set up and what they do on a daily basis. They also describe how the French brigade method where the different workers are given a single purpose in the kitchen and someone puts the different ingredients together. They also describe how a bar and restaurant figures out how large their portions should be with an equations. They also describe the steward’s job of keeping every machine in the hotel functional and the caters job of preparing and serving food.
    Vocab
    director of food and beverage- Is the person that manages the dinning room.
    Report to gen manager- Reports to created to describe the goings on of the dinning room.
    Banquet- A formal dinner.
    Banquets event order-the plans a customer has for their banquet.
    Brigade- The system that kitchens use to make large sums of food in stations.
    Capture rate- In hotel food and beverage practice =, and the number of guests who use the dinning room.
    Catering- Part of the food and beverage division of a hotel that is responsible for arranging and planning food and beverage functions for banquets and the like.
    Catering coordinator- Person who is in charge of the banquets.
    Catering event order- The plan created by a customer for a banquet.
    Catering services manager- Head of catering services department.
    Chef tournant- Chef who rotates the stations.
    Chef steward- Person in charge of cleaning
    classroom style seating- Meeting setup usually used when teaching a group of people.
    Contribution margin- The cost of the ingredients of an individual menu item.
    Dinner-style room seating- casual dinning
    director of seating- The person who is charge of seating people in a dinning hall.
    Director of catering- The person in charge of serving food.
    Executive chef-Head of the kitchen.
    Food cost %- A ratio comparing the cost of food sold to food sales, which is calculated by dividing the cost of food sold during a given period by food sales during the same period.
    Food sales %- A ratio of comparing the cost of food sold to food sales which is calculated by dividing the cost of food sold during a given period by food sales during the same period.
    Horseshoe -style room setting- A meeting room containing tables arranged in a “U” shape.
    Kitchen manager- Individual who manages the kitchen department.
    Labor cost %- Cost of an operation that is dedicated to paying staff.
    Perpetual inventory- A running inventory that automatically updates itself.
    Pilferage- Stealing
    pour cost %- cost of food dedicated to paying for drinks.
    Responsible alcoholic bev ser- Making sure to give to make sure the customers do not injury themselves from drinking to much.
    Restaurant manager- Head of restaurant operation.
    Room service- Resupplying of rooms by the hotel.
    Shopper- People pretending to be customers who are observing the operation.
    Sous chef- supervisor of food prep. Reports to executive chef.
    Station chef- A chef in charge of a station.
    Theater-style room seating- Meeting setup designed for a large audience where people do not need to take notes or refer to any documents.

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  92. Kunle Kernizan

    Kunle kernizan
    chp8

    This chapter describes how different managed service segments work. It describes how airlines and the military manage food services. They also describe how schools use nutritional systems to feed their students correctly. They also describe how University cafeterias work and how they set prices and take a profit.
    Batch cooking- cooking large sums of
    commercial food services- A company that is outsourced to make food in cafeterias.
    Contractors- A company that operates a food service for the client on a contractual basis.
    daily rate- The amount of money a contractor gets in a day,.
    liaison personnel-People who help coordinate between the contractors and the businesses they work for.
    managed services- Day to day management activities.
    national school program- Program that feeds low income children.
    nutrition education progress- Program that makes sure that schools use proper nutrition systems in their cafeterias.
    Self-operators- Places that do not use contractors
    tray lines- The line of trays in hospital meal preparations where items are added to trays the to complete the order.

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  93. cecebezou

    Chapter 8 Summary
    Chapter 8 describes all the service that has to be managed within the hotel industry. Managed services are the practice of day-to-day management responsibilities and functions as a strategic method for improving operations and cutting expenses. Generally the client remains fully accountable for the overall management and control of the organization or system – including the functionality and performance of the managed service. Usually a very wide range of services can be managed in this way, including: HR-activities, production support, computer and IT systems. In the chapter it also explains the food service industry and where they play a major role in places such as airports, healthcare facilities, elementary and secondary schools as well as colleges.
    Key Words & Concepts
    1) Batch cooking: Sarah removed the last batch of pies from the oven at 4:00p.m. Then at 6:00pm she begins cooking another batch for the evening people.
    2) Contractors: I hired the contractor to furnish my apartment and make sure the job was done well.
    3) Commercial Food Service: The bark, raisin, and oil of the eucalyptus are of the well know commercial food service products.
    4) Daily Rate: the United Nation has a daily rate chart visitors to Norway as the best place to live in the world.
    5) Liaison Personnel: The Company’s insurance liaison personnel will work with you and have her employer develop an insurance plan that meets your needs.
    6) Managed Services: the United States managed service by making sure our mails or packages are delivered to us in a timely fashion matter.
    7) National School Lunch Program: The NSLP served 30.5 million children each day at the cost of 8.7 billion for fiscal year 2007.
    8) Nutrition Education Program: the government agencies incorporate nutrients education program such as; let’s move launched by first lady Michelle Obama in February 2010.
    9) Self- Operator: Barbers and Beauticians are self- operators in their profession and making sure all aspects of business are well organized.
    10) Tray Line: Tray line workers are responsible for reading patient meal tickets and assemble the tray with all appropriate items.

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  94. Kunle Kernizan

    Kunle kernizan
    hmgt1101
    chp 14

    chapter 14 is about leadership. They start out by defining leadership and describing the characteristics a leader posses. They also give examples of leadership and what leaders are expected to do. They also describe what management is and what mangers are expected to do.
    Communication-The act of speaking to others and getting your ideas explained to them.
    Controlling- provision of information to monitoring activities.
    decision making- Process of making decisions.
    Effectiveness- Describing how well an action will work in reality
    efficiency-making sure that an action is done with the least amount of effort
    ethics-study of standards and moral conduct
    front line managers-low level manager who manages who controls front line employees
    human resources and motivating- individual who manages and develops a companies personal
    leader/manager-individual who is both a leader and manager
    leadership-influence of one person over another.
    Management-process of coordinating work activating
    managing- act of controlling activities
    middle managers- manager between top brass and workers.
    Organizing- the process of planning actions before they are done.
    Planning-the process of defining an organizations goals
    top managers- manager near the top of the company responsible for making decisions
    transactional leadership- a type of leadership that is designed to create loyalty to the organization
    transformational leadership- leadership that changes the opinions of the people in the organization itself

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  95. SoniaJ

    Chapter 11 Summary – S.Jobity
    Professor Duchamp – 1101

    In chapter 11 the main focus is on gambling and all forms of gambling. The chapter speaks upon how casinos utilize gambling, and how it operates in a particular setting. Also, how large resorts utilize gambling to its advantage.

    1. Baccarat: a gambling card game in which players hold two- or three-cards.
    2. Blackjack: card game in which players try to acquire cards with a face value as close as possible to 21 without going over.
    3. Casino Resort: luxurious hotels found in Atlantic City and Las Vegas.
    4. Comp: to give away something for free; promotions. The manager at the restaurant gave us free drinks after they messed up our order.
    5. Craps: Growing up I used to watch the guys roll dice in the streets.
    6. Gambling: I knew a lot of people who placed bet on their homes because they had an addiction.
    7. Handle: the total amount of money waged or bet over a particular time.
    8. Hold Percentage: a term used for the ratio of gaming chips the casino keeps, or an amount that the casino wins over a period of time.
    9. Poker: card game that is played by two or more people who bet money or some type of wages.
    10. Roulette: game where the dealer spins a wheel with numbers and drops a ball while the player bets on the number before it stops.
    11. Win: the amount of bets received by the casino operator

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  96. Barb Turinetti

    If you appreciate enjoying online casino games, possibly you would enjoy enjoying in a casino game position unit, it is quite exciting particularly when you win. This provides you the excitement and pleasure that numerous casino goers need for once they play in the casinos. You do not need to happen to be Las Vegas or Atlantic Town to take pleasure from slot gaming fun. It may be loved equally as much wherever you happen to live.

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  97. Stretch Quartz

    Shoppers love the excitement and the thrill of shopping in any sort of Earnings Shops saw this and made a decision to make this month, black thurdays, as their opportunity to get excited about gross sales and to sell their Products In fact, many shops started their year by presenting discounts and special Presents The major reason why retailers started out upsetting special deals on black Friday was to attract more Valued clientele This has labored out just fine for them.

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