Books Unite Us Censorship Divides Us

Freedom to Read Under Attack 

Read Banned Books decorative graphicBanned Books Week, an annual celebration of the freedom to read, will be held September 18–24 this year. During this week, authors, booksellers, librarians, publishers, and readers come together to advocate for the right to read without censorship. The theme for 2022 is “Books Unite Us. Censorship Divides Us.”  

Free and open access to ideas and information is a critical element of our democracy. The observation of Banned Books Week pushes back against censors: people who try to remove or restrict access to books that they find threatening in some way.

Book challenges often come from parents who want to restrict access to materials they find offensive. They want to control what their children, and their neighbors’ children, can read in school classrooms and public libraries. Targets are often books by or about Black or LGBTQ people. Censors label these books as “obscene” or “harmful to minors” or even as tools for “grooming” children for exploitation. For example, the Proud Boys protesting at Drag Queen storytimes claim to be protecting children from the corrupting influence of fairy tales and glitter. 

Unfortunately, the intense political polarization of the past several years has resulted in an increase in censorship activity. Attempts to remove books from libraries, and attacks on librarians, are on the rise. According to the American Library Association, the number of banned and challenged books doubled from 2020 to 2021, reaching the highest number since tracking began. There were more than 729 attempted bans of 1,597 individual books in 2021. 

Another disturbing trend is that more states are passing legislation to ban books and to restrict what librarians and K-12 teachers can add to their reading lists and book collections. In states where these new laws are in effect, educators who attempt to share banned materials or even talk about bans are being harassed and threatened. Banned Books Week 2022 is an opportunity to applaud those who stand up for our freedom to read, even at a cost to themselves. 

For more information on book banning and censorship:

“How Efforts to Ban Books Impact Public Libraries” Discussed on WNYC’s “The Takeaway”

Why Are People Banning Books?

Book Bans? My School Doesn’t Even Have a Library (Opinion) 

Top 10 Most Challenged Books of 2021

The ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom tracked 729 challenges to library, school, and university materials and services in 2021. Of the 1597 books that were targeted, here are the most challenged, along with the reasons cited for censoring the books:

  • Gender Queer by Maia Kobabe Reasons: Banned, challenged, and restricted for LGBTQIA+ content, and because it was considered to have sexually explicit images
  • Lawn Boy by Jonathan Evison Reasons: Banned and challenged for LGBTQIA+ content and because it was considered to be sexually explicit
  • All Boys Aren’t Blue by George M. Johnson Reasons: Banned and challenged for LGBTQIA+ content, profanity, and because it was considered to be sexually explicit
  • Out of Darkness by Ashley Hope Perez Reasons: Banned, challenged, and restricted for depictions of abuse and because it was considered to be sexually explicit
  • The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas Reasons: Banned and challenged for profanity, violence, and because it was thought to promote an anti-police message and indoctrination of a social agenda
  • The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie Reasons: Banned and challenged for profanity, sexual references and use of a derogatory term
  • Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews Reasons: Banned and challenged because it was considered sexually explicit and degrading to women
  • The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison Reasons: Banned and challenged because it depicts child sexual abuse and was considered sexually explicit
  • This Book is Gay by Juno Dawson Reasons: Banned, challenged, relocated, and restricted for providing sexual education and LGBTQIA+ content.
  • Beyond Magenta by Susan Kuklin Reasons: Banned and challenged for LGBTQIA+ content and because it was considered to be sexually explicit

If you want to read a banned or challenged book (including some of the ones listed above) and see what all the controversy is about, check out our display in the front area of the library!

This post was co-authored by Rachel Jones and Nora Almeida

What’s New in the Library Fall 2022

Welcome to a new semester! And welcome (or welcome back) to everyone who is returning to in-person classes or new to City Tech. 

Need a book, a quiet place to study or work on a project, or research help? The library is open and all of our in person services are up and running. Come visit us on the 4th floor of the Library building Mondays-Thursdays from 9-8pm and Fridays from 9-5pm.  

Learning or teaching online? We’ve still got you covered.

Get virtual help 24X7

Off campus or up late working on a project and need help? Just Ask us! 

You can chat with CUNY Librarians on weekdays and librarians from other institutions on evenings and weekends. 

Access Library Resources from Off-Campus

Use CUNY login credentials to access library databases, research articles, movies, and ebooks from off campus. 

Use these same credentials to login to “My Library Account” on the library website. If your preferred name isn’t associated with your library account, you can change that! 

Tech Loans 

In coordination and support from the ASAP program, the library is offering a limited number of PC laptops for 7 day loan to all City Tech students. Laptops are available to borrow in the Multimedia Resource Center in the library.

Need Something We Don’t Have?

Interlibrary Loan has expanded its services! Faculty, staff, and now students can request books not available at CUNY through ILL. We are also continuing to fill article and individual book chapter requests and deliver them electronically. ILL is great for scholarly research and course assignments.

Your CUNY login is connected to your ILL account, so you’ll have one less password to remember!

Questions? Email us: interlibraryloan@citytech.cuny.edu

Library Instruction Offerings 

Are you assigning papers or projects that require library research? You can request a library instruction session for your in-person or online synchronous class. 

Are you teaching asynchronously or want your students to learn research skills at their own pace? Share the library’s tutorials and research guides with your students. The library is automatically embedded in Blackboard courses and you can add library widgets to your OpenLab site. 

Contact your library subject specialist to find out more about subject-specific resources and support for your asynchronous class.

For general questions about library instruction, contact Prof. Rachel Jones, library instruction coordinator.

Features Eresources 

The library has amazing video collections to help with your teaching and learning (and entertainment!). Browse streaming video collections from Swank and Kanopy or explore the amazing catalog of Academic Video Online.

We’ve also added new databases from HeinOnline on Civil Rights and Social Justice and LGBTQ+ Rights to our collections, as well as the CUNY-made Northeast Slavery Records Index (NESRI). 

Don’t forget to use your City Tech email to sign up for (or renew) your free access to the New York Times and Wall Street Journal!

New Research Guides

Library faculty have created a number of new research guides for the City Tech community. Research guides are a great place to: start your research; learn about resources we have in a particular discipline or media format; and get tips on how to search for, evaluate, and cite sources.

Media Browsing 

The Multimedia Resource Center (MRC) is piloting an open browsing program. Students can enter the back staff area and browse the library’s collection of VHS cassettes, DVDs, Blu-Rays, and vinyl records. For more information, contact Prof. Junior Tidal – jtidal@citytech.cuny.edu

Course Reserves

You can place textbooks and required readings for your courses in the Library’s Reserve Collection for your students to use in the library.

Please place your requests as soon as possible as we purchase on a first-come, first-served basis. Request materials to be placed on reserve using this form

Questions?  Email us: NYCCTCirculation@citytech.cuny.edu

Support for Scholarly Publishing 

Complementing our workshop series, the library provides individualized and small group assistance supporting scholarly publishing. In addition to our Scholarly Publishing Clinic, a monthly office hour available for virtual consultations on the first Tuesday of the month at 3 PM, consultations are available on demand. Contact Monica Berger at mberger@citytech.cuny.edu. Learn more about how the library supports scholarly publishing.

Don’t Be a Stranger

Have questions about library resources and services but not sure how to reach us? Want to make sure you get the latest updates about changing policies, new resources, and digital tools available through the library? 

Subscribe to the Library Buzz blog to get the latest in your inbox or follow us on Twitter and Instagram @citytechlibrary. 

Students! Interested in working in the library?

The library is looking for students interested in becoming College Assistants for the Fall 2022 semester. Interested students should email Administrative Specialist, Suraya Choudhury  or stop by the library during open hours to fill out an application. See below for more information about the position.

Job Title: Library College Assistant – Hourly
Location: NYC College of Technology
Full/Part Time: Part-Time
Regular/Temporary: Regular
Contract Title: College Assistant
FLSA: Non-Exempt
Closing Date: Open until filled
Availability: 10-15 hours per week; daytime, evenings, and weekends

Campus Specific Information
The Ursula C. Schwerin Library at New York City College of Technology has positions available for College Assistants in the following operational units: Circulation Services, Multimedia Lab, Periodicals and Internet Lab.

General Duties
– Perform technical operations in areas including library circulation, collection processing, and maintenance
– Manage routine workflows during evening and weekend hours including the circulation cash register
– Provide service to library users in person and by phone: answer questions, enforce policies
– Uses online system to perform various tasks in both circulation and technical services
– Assist students with computer use, printing, scanners, and other technical support needs

Preferred Qualifications
– Must be prompt and responsible
– Prior work experience in a library is a plus
– Ability to multitask and follow complex instructions
– Demonstrated success working both individually and in collaborative environments –
– Excellent judgment and professionalism
– Strong interpersonal skills
– Knowledge of Microsoft Office

Compensation
$15.61 per hour

Saturday Hours during finals!

Need a quiet space to study for a final exam or to work on a project? The City Tech Library has you covered! 

In addition to our regular weekday hours, we’ll be open the next 2 Saturdays–May 14th and May 21th–from 12pm-4pm.

Working on a research project or paper? We can help you find sources, integrate research into a paper or project, create perfect citations, and more.

Visit us at the Ask a Librarian desk or get in-depth help during our drop in research paper help sessions:

May 12th 1-3pm

May 13th 9-11am

May 16th 2-4pm

Need help outside of these hours? Just ask us! Chat reference is available 24X7

 

Celebrate National Poetry Month

National Poetry Month 

Since 1996 the Academy of American Poets has designated April as National Poetry Month. City Tech Library faculty and staff have shared a selection of some of their favorite poems below. You  can also find new selections of poetry to borrow in the library. Featured titles are on display at the front of the library space on the fourth floor.

National Poetry Month Poster

Untitled (Perfect Lovers): Two Commercial Clocks: Felix Gonzalez-Torres: 1987-89 By Eduardo C. Corral

   a sentence bleeding milk

   to burn like the lost

   darner amberwing skimmer

   the light of the next door

   after hunger a watermark

   in armor in lilac

   music in the mirrors

   sleeping but falling

   nightly the fragrant hymns

   prophecies like salt

   torn ram tar mint star thorn

   rain in the throat

   to scatter the golden dirt

   vague gods small truths

   to leap over the hours

Submitted by Kel R. Karpinski

I really love Corral’s poetry in general – his collection Slow Lightning is really spectacular. He writes a lot of ekphrastic poems engaging with art work by other queer and Latinx artists. I love that Corral is using his poetry to make a queer lineage. This one is about a piece by one of my favourite artists – Felix Gonzalez-Torres who created this piece Untitled (Perfect Lovers): Two Commercial Clocks for his lover who died of HIV-AIDS. Much of his work deals with the impermanence of life and finding meaning in the quotidien. Check out what the piece looks like when it’s exhibited and read a letter Gonzalez-Torres wrote to his lover about it.

resolution # 1,003 :: june jordan

I will love who loves me

I will love as much as I am loved

I will hate who hates me

I will feel nothing for everyone oblivious to me

I will stay indifferent to indifference

I will live hostile to hostility

I will make myself a passionate and eager lover

in response to passionate and eager love

I will be nobody’s fool

Submitted by Wanett Clyde

As a person who is not particularly drawn to poetry I tend to like things that fall into the clever wordplay or declaration of war categories. For me this June Jordan poem, that I think of every New Year’s Eve, falls into the latter. While it’s not a true call to arms, it is a declaration of a kind. I re-read it whenever I need a kickstart, a reminder or a shield for battle. 

The Bridge by Lisa Jarnot

That there are things that can never be the same about

my face, the houses, or the sand, that I was born under the

sign of the sheep, that like Abraham Lincoln I am serious

but also lacking in courage,

 

That from this yard I have been composing a great speech,

that I write about myself, that it’s good to be a poet, that I look

like the drawing of a house that was pencilled by a child,

that curiously, I miss him and my mind is not upon the Pleaides,

that I love the ocean and its foam against the sky,

That I am sneezing like a lion in this garden that he knows

the lilies of his Nile, distant image, breakfast, a flock of birds

and sparrows from the sky,

 

That I am not the husband of Cassiopeia, that I am not

the southern fish, that I am not the last poet of civilization,

that if I want to go out for a walk and then to find myself

beneath a bank of trees, weary, that this is the life that I had,

That curiously I miss the sound of the rain pounding

on the roof and also all of Oakland, that I miss the sounds of

sparrows dropping from the sky, that there are sparks behind

my eyes, on the radio, and the distant sound of sand blasters,

and breakfast, and every second of it, geometric, smoke

from the chimney of the trees where I was small,

 

That in January, I met him in a bar, we went

home together, there was a lemon tree in the back yard,

and a coffee house where we stood outside and kissed,

That I have never been there, curiously, and that it never was

the same, the whole of the island, or the paintings of the stars,

fatherly, tied to sparrows as they drop down from the sky,

 

O rattling frame where I am, I am where there are still

these assignments in the night, to remember the texture

of the leaves on the locust trees in August, under the

moonlight, rounded, through a window in the hills,

That if I stay beneath the pole star in this harmony of

crickets that will sing, the bird sound on the screen,

the wide eyes of the owl form of him still in the dark,

blue, green, with shards of the Pacific,

 

That I do not know the dreams from which I have come,

sent into the world without the blessing of a kiss, behind the

willow trees, beside the darkened pansies on the deck beside

the ships, rocking, I have written this, across the back of the

sky, wearing a small and yellow shirt, near the reptile house,

mammalian, no bigger than the herd,

 

That I wrote the history of the war waged between the

Peloponnesians and the south, that I like to run through

shopping malls, that I’ve also learned to draw, having been

driven here, like the rain is driven into things, into the

ground, beside the broken barns, by the railroad tracks,

beside the sea, I, Thucydides, having written this, having

grown up near the ocean.

Listen to an audio version of the poem.

Submitted by Nora Almeida

This is one of the poems that I return to most often because it’s a poem about transition and how we look back in order to move forward. I studied with Lisa Jarnot in college and so the poem reminds me of her (and particularly her voice and cadence because I can always hear the way she would read it) and also of my hometown because of its invocation of the ocean and the specificity of childhood. I like how personal and expansive it is–mixing the mythology of an individual childhood with ancient greek figures. 

The Cremation of Sam McGee Robert Service (Read by Johnny Cash)

Submitted by Jen Hoyer

This is a classic for Canadian children (and adults), and for myself it brings back memories of camping trips up near Lake Laberge (Yukon Territory), visiting Robert Service’s cabin at Dawson City, and reading books of Service’s poetry that my grandmother passed down to me. I have always loved reading this poem, and the illustrations in this video, by Ted Harrison, are from my favorite print edition.

Learn more about this poem on Wikipedia.

Harlem by Langston Hughes

What happens to a dream deferred? 

Does it dry up 

like a raisin in the sun? 

Or fester like a sore— 

And then run? 

Does it stink like rotten meat? 

Or crust and sugar over— 

like a syrupy sweet? 

Maybe it just sags 

like a heavy load. 

Or does it explode? 

Submitted by Nanette Johnson 

 I recently learned the correct name of the poem Harlem, I always thought it was titled a Dream Deferred. I think many people (myself included) are working so hard and moving so fast that they don’t take time to focus on their dreams. The importance of dreams that can be linked to actionable goals is invaluable.  Don’t let anything negative or what you are experiencing now keep you from your dreams. 

I attended a West Indian Religious School, St. John’s Elementary School,  that wanted to make sure we were prepared for the hard world around us.  I believe  the teachers were trying to prepare our minds that as Black Caribbean and African Americans we were going to have to work hard to obtain our goals.  We couldn’t play all the time. This reminds me of an excerpt from the poem, The Ladder of St. Augustine by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow:

The heights by great men reached and kept

Were not attained by sudden flight,

But they, while their companions slept,

Were toiling upward in the night.

Her Kind by Anne Sexton 

I have gone out, a possessed witch,

haunting the black air, braver at night;

dreaming evil, I have done my hitch

over the plain houses, light by light:

lonely thing, twelve-fingered, out of mind.

A woman like that is not a woman, quite.

I have been her kind.

 

I have found the warm caves in the woods,

filled them with skillets, carvings, shelves,

closets, silks, innumerable goods;

fixed the suppers for the worms and the elves:

whining, rearranging the disaligned.

A woman like that is misunderstood.

I have been her kind.

 

I have ridden in your cart, driver,

waved my nude arms at villages going by,

learning the last bright routes, survivor

where your flames still bite my thigh

and my ribs crack where your wheels wind.

A woman like that is not ashamed to die.

I have been her kind.

Submitted by Rachel Jones

Anne Sexton’s life was creative, but also turbulent and destructive, as she had a severe form of bipolar disorder. Her therapist suggested that she channel her intensity and imagination into poetry. She became one of the most famous American poets of her time. In this poem, she writes of her identification with witches, symbols of rebellious power and independence. 

Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

      Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:

All mimsy were the borogoves,

      And the mome raths outgrabe.

“Beware the Jabberwock, my son!

      The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!

Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun

      The frumious Bandersnatch!”

He took his vorpal sword in hand;

      Long time the manxome foe he sought—

So rested he by the Tumtum tree

      And stood awhile in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,

      The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,

Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,

      And burbled as it came!

One, two! One, two! And through and through

      The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!

He left it dead, and with its head

      He went galumphing back.

“And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?

      Come to my arms, my beamish boy!

O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!”

      He chortled in his joy.

Jabberwocky Image

Submitted by Andrea Espinoza

So, from my earliest days, poetry has always been in my consciousness. When I was seven years old and living with my grandparents in Trinidad, one of my care packages contained the book “Through the Looking Glass” by Sir Lewis Caroll. Now, to this day, I could not tell you much about the plot of the book, but I always remember this poem that was written in the book. I think it resonated with me so much because the year that I received this book, we had a really bad rainy season in my village and I used to read this poem whenever the rain and thunder got to be too much. I guess the torrential downpour outside provided an amazing background track for the poem. My favorite aspect of the poem is that Carroll used a lot of his own made-up language. The made-up words transport me to another place and time where we wielded vocabulary as currency and poetry recitation was the norm.

The Prestige by Hanif Abdurraqib

the poem begins not where the knife enters

but where the blade twists.

Some wounds cannot be hushed

no matter the way one writes of blood

& what reflection arrives in its pooling.

The poem begins with pain as a mirror

inside of which I adjust a tie the way my father taught me

before my first funeral & so the poem begins

with old grief again at my neck. On the radio,

a singer born in a place where children watch the sky

for bombs is trying to sell me on love

as something akin to war.

I have no lie to offer as treacherous as this one.

I was most like the bullet when I viewed the body as a door.

I’m past that now. No one will bury their kin

when desire becomes a fugitive

between us. There will be no folded flag

at the doorstep. A person only gets to be called a widow once,

and then they are simply lonely. The bluest period.

Gratitude, not for love itself, but for the way it can end

without a house on fire.

This is how I plan to leave next.

Unceremonious as birth in a country overrun

by the ungrateful living. The poem begins with a chain

of well-meaning liars walking one by one

off the earth’s edge. That’s who died

and made me king. Who died and made you.

Submitted by Joshua Peach

Representing our shared hometown of Columbus, OH, Hanif Abdurraqib is a poet, essayist, and cultural critic. Abdurraqib’s ability to place words in new combinations to create intimate and expansive imagery draws me to his work. With an economy of language, he breathes life into complicated thoughts and feelings.

What’s New in the Library

Welcome to a new semester! We have a lot of great new things happening at the library and we’re also bringing back some pre-COVID classics.

Need a book, a quiet place to study or work on a project, or research help? The library is open and all of our in person services are up and running.

Come visit us on the 4th floor of the Library building weekdays from 9-5pm.  

Get virtual help 24X7

Off campus or up late working on a project and need help? Just Ask us! 

You can chat with CUNY Librarians on weekdays and librarians from other institutions on evenings and weekends. 

Books, Reserves, and More….

All of our collections, including reserve books, are now available. Borrow circulating books from the library stacks for 8 weeks, 2-hour reserve books for use in the library, and 3-week reserve books for 3 weeks (obviously). 

Because of budget constraints are currently only purchasing reserves by request. Place a reserve request.

Taking a math class? Our Graphing TI86 and Scientific TI36 calculators are available at the Borrow and Return desk. 

Sorry… we currently, we don’t have laptops or tablets available to borrow.

Learn more about borrowing, renewing, and returning library materials: https://library.citytech.cuny.edu/services/circulation/index.php 

Have questions? Email us: NYCCTCirculation@citytech.cuny.edu

Access Library Resources from Off-Campus

Use CUNY login credentials to access library databases, research articles, movies, and ebooks from off campus. 

Use these same credentials to login to “My Library Account” on the library website. If your preferred name isn’t associated with your library account, you can change that! 

Featured Eresources

We have a ton of electronic resources to help with your research including these new additions:

  • AVON: this database of streaming videos includes over 66,000 titles across subject areas including anthropology, business, counseling, film, health, history, music, and more.
  • Digital Theatre+ : now available off campus, watch videos of theater performances, read related theory and criticism, and more.

Don’t forget! You can access free digital newspaper subscriptions through the Library. 

Need Something We Don’t Have?

We don’t have everything but…City Tech Students, Faculty, and Staff can request materials from any CUNY library and pick them up at City Tech. 

Interlibrary Loan is continuing to fill article and individual book chapter requests and deliver them electronically. ILL is great for scholarly research and course assignments.

Faculty and staff can also request books not available at CUNY through ILL.

Questions? Email us: interlibraryloan@citytech.cuny.edu 

Library Instruction Offerings 

Are you assigning papers or projects that require library research? You can request a library instruction session for your in-person or online synchronous class. 

Are you teaching asynchronously? Share the library’s tutorials and research guides with your students. Use the Blackboard library module, or add the library widget to your OpenLab site, so your students can access library search tools. 

Contact your library subject specialist to find out more about subject-specific resources and support for your asynchronous class.

For general questions about library instruction, contact Prof. Anne Leonard, library instruction coordinator.

Library Workshops

This semester we’re offering a mix of online and in-person workshops for every audience. Need help citing sources or creating a resume? Want to learn about protecting your privacy online? Considering applying to graduate school but not sure where to start? There’s a workshop for that!

We also offer workings on scholarly publishing and Open Educational Resources every semester. 

Keep an eye on your inbox and check our website and social media channels for more information about upcoming workshops and registration information.

Support for Scholarly Publishing 

Complementing our workshop series, the library provides individualized assistance. Do you need help with any aspect of scholarly publishing? Our Scholarly Publishing Clinic is available for virtual consultations. Learn how to pick the best journal or publisher for your article or book, retain rights as an author, create a Google Scholar profile or search alert, use Academic Works and citation managers, and more. 

Office hours are by appointment every last Thursday of each month this semester at 4 PM via Zoom or phone. Email Prof. Monica Berger to schedule your consultation and discuss your preferences for shared communication. Use this form to give us advance notice of your question. Don’t forget that you can also reach out to your subject liaison in the library. 

We’ll be announcing this semester’s workshops soon so stay tuned! In the meantime, you can also teach yourself about a variety of topics including open access, copyright, and ORCID author identifiers on our revamped scholarly publishing landing page. Your feedback about the page is welcome.

Don’t Be a Stranger

Have questions about library resources and services but not sure how to reach us? Want to make sure you get the latest updates about changing policies, new resources, and digital tools available through the library? 

Subscribe to the Library Buzz blog to get the latest in your inbox or follow us on Twitter and Instagram @citytechlibrary.

Trans Day of Remembrance

Flyer with event info listed below

It’s transgender awareness week and student leaders are organizing an important solidarity and remembrance event this Friday, November 19th at 12pm in downtown Brooklyn.

Join City Tech SGA and NYPIRG for a rally and solidarity march to celebrate trans lives and to honor lives lost.

The event will start at City Tech in the courtyard outside of the Tillary Street entrance where students will lead a speak out and rally. At 12:30pm participants will march across the Brooklyn Bridge, following the march, there will be a moment of silence to commemorate lives lost.

Attendees are encouraged to bring signs and share their own stories.

The City Tech Library is also screening the film Disclosure this week in celebration of transgender awareness week. Learn more about the screening and how to access the film.

 

New Podcast Episode: The Library One Shot

The latest episode of City Tech stories features an interview with Prof. Anne Leonard, Coorindator of Library Instruction, and a discussion about the “library one-shot”–a term that refers to the discrete instruction sessions that the library offers to help support students doing research, usually in their first semester of college.

A recent editorial from the journal College & Research Libraries by Nicole Pagowsky on “The Contested One-Shot” is used as a reference point for the discussion which touches on classroom power dynamics, student engagement, and the challenges and opportunities presented by online learning.

Check out our latest episode, and subscribe to the podcast!

Vote in the New York City General Election!

We are just weeks away from going to the polls to vote in the general election. Election Day is November 2, 2021. The following post is intended to guide City Tech students through the voting process, and to inform them of their voting rights.

Can I vote?

In order to register to vote you must:

  • be a United States citizen;
  • be 18 years old;  
  • resident of this State and the county, city or village for at least 30 days before the election;
  • not be in prison or on parole for a felony conviction;  
  • not be adjudged mentally incompetent by a court; and 
  • not claim the right to vote elsewhere.

New York residents can register to vote by visiting this website. [However, the deadline has passed to register in time for the upcoming election in November.]

If you think you may have already registered to vote, you can check your voter registration status online, or by calling the Board of Elections at 866-868-3692.

How do I vote?

 All New Yorkers have three ways to vote in the 2021 primary elections. 

  • Early Voting: Vote in-person from October 23 – October 31. Your Early Voting site may be different from your Election Day poll site, so make sure to check before you go.
  • Vote by Mail: All registered voters also have the option to vote by mail by requesting an absentee ballot. The deadline is October 18. 
  • Election Day: All registered voters can vote in-person on November 2. Find your Election Day poll site here

What’s on the ballot?

For the 2021 general election there are candidates for:

  • Mayor
  • Comptroller
  • Public Advocate
  • City Council – 35 of 51 seats
  • Borough President – Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island
  • District Attorney – Brooklyn and Manhattan

In addition there are five ballot measures regarding proposed changes to the New York State Constitution. Voters will vote “Yes” or “No” on each of these proposals. If a majority of New Yorkers vote “Yes,” then these changes will go into effect.

Proposals at a glance

Question 1: The Redistricting Process

This proposal would reform the redistricting process that determines representation across the state. Proposal Details

Question 2: Right to Clean Air, Clean Water, and a Healthful Environment

This proposal would provide the right to clean air, clean water, and a healthful environment to all New Yorkers. Proposal Details

Question 3: Same-Day Voter Registration

This proposal would allow the State Legislature to pass new laws that give New Yorkers more time to register to vote. Proposal Details

Question 4: No-Excuse Absentee Voting

This proposal would allow the State Legislature to pass new laws that give more New Yorkers the option to vote by mail without providing an excuse. Proposal Details

Question 5: Jurisdiction of the New York City Civil Court

This proposal would allow NYC Civil Courts to hear and decide claims up to $50,000 instead of $25,000. Proposal Details

Where do I vote?

You can find your Election Day polling place here. You can also call 866-VOTE-NYC, or email vote@boe.nyc.ny.us with your complete home address and a request for your poll location. All polling locations are open from 6:00 a.m. until 9:00 p.m on November 2nd.

What are my rights?

At your poll site you have the right to:

  • Ask a poll worker for help
  • Use an interpreter if you need language assistance
  • Bring any voting materials with you 
  • Vote even if the voting machine is broken
  • Vote by affidavit ballot if your name is missing from the list of voters at your polling site
  • Not show an ID if you are not a first time voter

What if I have problems?

Voters who experience discrimination or other barriers to registration and voting can contact the Civil Rights Bureau of the New York State Attorney General’s Office at (212) 416-8250 or email civil.rights@ag.ny.gov

What if I have more questions?

If you have any questions or concerns, these organizations may be able to help.

New York City Board of Elections https://www.vote.nyc/ or 866-VOTE-NYC

New York State Board of Elections: https://www.elections.ny.gov/

League of Women Voters Vote: 411 https://www.vote411.org/ or 212-725-3541

NYC Votes: www.voting.nyc

Library Spaces are Open!

Open Sign
Image credit: CC-BY Aaron Pruzaniec

Space and services

The City Tech Library is now open for quiet study, in-person reference service, browsing and borrowing books from our stacks, computer and scanner use, as well as printing for students.

Please note that we’re not able to offer textbook reserves, calculator loans, or group study at this time.

Hours

Our physical space is open Monday-Thursday from 9:00am-5:00pm, and we’re open for book pickup only (for books you have requested from other CUNY libraries and via Interlibrary Loan) Friday 9:00am-5:00pm.

Don’t have a City Tech ID?

That’s ok! You can use your 8-digit EMPLID or City Tech ID to login to library computers and print. You can borrow books with either your City Tech or a state issued ID. 

Online Resources

We continue to offer library services and resources online, including our 24/7 Ask a Librarian chat service, research guides, and digital tutorials.

Need something we don’t have?

You can request books from other CUNY libraries using your CUNY login to pick up at the Borrow and Return desk. Faculty can request articles and books from libraries outside of CUNY and students can request articles and book chapters using our Interlibrary Loan service.

E-reserves Pilot Program

We are currently offering e-reserves on a trial basis. Learn more about this pilot program.  Because of copyright restrictions, we can’t scan textbooks and some other materials. Check out our Fair Use and Copyright Guide for more information about what materials can be made available electronically to students.