New article: Redesigning Program Assessment for Teaching with Primary Sources: Understanding the Impacts of Our Work

American Archivist issue coverJen Hoyer, Instructor, Technical Services and Electronic Resources Librarian published “Redesigning Program Assessment for Teaching with Primary Sources: Understanding the Impacts of Our Work” in American Archivist, the premiere journal in the specialty of archives.  Her article is freely available to read in Academic Works.

In 2-3 sentences, describe your scholarship or creative work to someone unfamiliar with the field.
This article looks at instruction in archives and special collections addresses some big picture questions while also looking at exciting, program-specific findings that are hopefully replicable in other settings. The larger question framing our work was: if we redesign the assessment protocols we use to evaluate our instruction programs, will that make a difference? The answer was a resounding “yes,” and we demonstrated that by sharing a redesign assessment protocol that others can use and adapt for their own instruction work.

What makes you particularly proud of this work?
I’m proud of this work because, in the field of teaching with primary sources amongst archivists and librarians, there’s been a real desire for more serious conversations about assessment but we’ve struggled to find our footing. I hope that this work is a step forward, and a step that others can build on.

New article! Library Tautology: A Reenactment of the One-Shot

College and Research Libraries, Sept. 2022Nora Almeida, Associate Professor, Instruction and Outreach Librarian recently published an article, “Library Tautology: A Reenactment of the One-Shot” in a special issue of College and Research Libraries. Her article is freely available to read in Academic Works.

Nora will be talking about her article as on a panel of authors from the special issue on November 16 at 2 PM. Registration :: Registrants are welcome to submit questions  in advance of the event.

In 2-3 sentences, describe your scholarship or creative work to someone unfamiliar with the field.
My scholarship generally focuses on intersections of Library and Information Science and Critical Theory–specifically drawing from Feminist Theory and Performance Theory. Much of my work, including this non-traditional essay, explores care labor, neoliberalism, and institutional power dynamics.

What makes you particularly proud of this work?
Think it’s great that more academic journals are publishing non-traditional (and “non-academic”) scholarship, which opens up / shifts disciplinary discourse norms and potentially allows for a wider readership base.

New book by Jen Hoyer: What Primary Sources Teach Lessons for Every Classroom

cover of What Primary Sources Teach Lessons for Every ClassroomJen Hoyer, Instructor and Eresources, Technical Services Librarian has co-authored the new book What Primary Sources Teach Lessons for Every Classroom with ABC-CLIO. The book is available for purchase from the publisher.

In 2-3 sentences, describe your scholarship or creative work to someone unfamiliar with the field.
This book provides hands-on strategies for providing skills-based instruction with primary source material. Organized as a set of adaptable lesson plans, this publication is designed to support classroom teachers, archivists, and special collections librarians alike. Two additional chapters on differentiation and on adapting lesson plans to fit whatever archival material you have on hand support instructors in being creative and catering to the needs of their students.

What makes you particularly proud of this work?
I’m really excited about how this book advocates for and supports instruction that centers the student.

New book by Jen Hoyer and Nora Almeida: The Social Movement Archive

The Social Movement Archive

Jen Hoyer, Instructor and Eresources, Technical Services Librarian and Nora Almeida, Associate Professor,  Instruction and Outreach Librarian published The Social Movement Archive with Litwin Books. The
introduction is available open access in Academic Works and the full book is available for purchase from Litwin Books.

In 2-3 sentences, describe your scholarship or creative work to someone unfamiliar with the field.
This publication represents an intersection of Jen and Nora’s scholarship that focuses on archival theory, social movement history, and material culture. This is a book about archives but also about cultural ephemera and the role that cultural production and art serves in social movement organizing. This book might interest to archivists and library professionals as well as activists or scholars who study social movements or new materialism.

What makes you particularly proud of this work?
One of the best parts of this project was that it gave us an opportunity to talk to movement activists and artists supporting social movement organizing. We also see this book filling a gap in current literature about alternative archives–many scholars are advocating for more inclusion of the perspective of content creators in archives by involving them in description but rarely include these perspectives in their own scholarship.

Add anything else you’d like the reader of our blog to know about your work
This book is illustrated and contains full color reproductions of primary source material created by contributors. People interested in this book might want to know more about the social movements represented which include: women’s liberation, disability rights, housing justice, Black liberation, anti-war, Indigenous sovereignty, immigrant rights, and prisoner abolition, among others.

New book chapter by Monica Berger–Teaching Authors about Predatory Journals in the One-on-One Consultation

Monica Berger, Associate Professor, Instruction and Scholarly Communications Librarian, recently published a book chapter “Teaching Authors about Predatory Journals in the One-on-One Consultation” in The Scholarly Communications Cookbook, edited by Brianna Buljung and Emily Bongiovanni (Association of College and Research Libraries). The chapter is licensed CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 to encourage adaption and reuse.

Scholarly Communications Cookbook

In 2-3 sentences, describe your scholarship or creative work to someone unfamiliar with the field.
This book chapter provides guidance to academic librarians so they can effectively help colleagues with questions about predatory or questionable publishers. It emphasizes the importance of reading and use of tools like Think. Check. Submit. that encourage critical thinking about evaluating publishing choices, a scholarly information literacy skill. A fun part of writing the chapter was the “Allergy Warnings” section where I tackle many of the sensitive aspects of these discussions and remind librarians that their role is not to determine if a publisher or journal is predatory.

What makes you particularly proud of this work?
It’s always exciting to share applied knowledge.

Anything else you’d like the reader of our blog to know about your work?
I am continuing to critique how the discourse on predatory publishing is saddled by notions of quality that are determined by publishers and other stakeholders in high income countries. That doesn’t mean there aren’t publishers who are unethical or who ignore fundamental best practices for scholarly publishing. It’s been quite challenging to work on a subject that is so ambiguous and continues to evolve.

Prof. Wanett Clyde’s presentation and more on fashion for the Brooklyn Waterfront Research Center

Prof. Wanett Clyde of the City Tech Library recently gave a presentation for the Brooklyn Waterfront Research Center (BWRC) Breakfast Talk series, where she discussed her research on fashion in Brooklyn. Entitled “Fashioning Brooklyn: Designing, Manufacturing, Selling and Recycling Apparel along Brooklyn’s Waterfront,” the presentation included additional speakers, Prof. Denise Sutton of the City Tech Business Department, Tessa Maffucci, Assistant Chair of the Pratt Fashion Department, and Rick Davy, Founder and Director of Brooklyn Style Foundation (BKSF) and the Creative Director and Producer of Fashion Week Brooklyn. The discussion examined the garment and fashion industry centered around Downtown Brooklyn.

If you missed the presentation on March 4th, you can watch the recording below.

New book by Junior Tidal–Podcasting: A practical guide for librarians

A photo of Prof. Junior Tidal Junior Tidal, Associate Professor, Multimedia & Web Services Librarian, recently published a monograph: Tidal, J. (2021). Podcasting: A practical guide for librarians. Chicago: Rowman & Littlefield. A sample chapter, What Is a Podcast?, is freely available from Academic Works.

In 2-3 sentences, describe your scholarship or creative work to someone unfamiliar with the field.
This book is a primer on podcasting, specifically intended for librarians and library workers. It not only provides the technical process of recording a podcast and posting it on the Internet, but also explains how to promote the podcast, what to podcast about, where to podcast, and how to even incorporate videocasts.

What makes you particularly proud of this work?
I feel like podcasting is a low barrier medium to access, and is especially critical in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s another way for libraries to connect with their communities. I am also especially proud of this work because it I wrote it exclusively during the pandemic.

Add anything else you’d like the reader of our blog to know about your work
You can listen to the City Tech Library’s podcast, City Tech stories, which is hosted by a variety of faculty librarians.