Faculty Workshop, April 18, Get Organized! Zotero Basics

Zotero logo Get Organized! Zotero Basics
April 18, 3:30-4:30 PM
Attendees will learn the capabilities of this powerful, free open-source reference management software program. The session covers the functionalities of the Zotero client, adding the Zotero plugin to your browser, and importing citations to generate a bibliography. To maximize our workshop time, please download Zotero from https://www.zotero.org and create your username and password in the Zotero client software by going to EDIT > PREFERENCES > >SYNC
Registration

Faculty Workshop, 3/28: Get Evidence! Scholarly Metrics for Your PARSE and CV

Einstein's Google Scholar profile

Get Evidence! Scholarly Metrics for Your PARSE and CV
March 28, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
Covers Google Scholar Profile for citations and Google Scholar for journal rankings, Scimago for journal rankings, Altmetric Attention Scores for social media, and download reports from Academic Works (and other repositories). We’ll also touch on finding individual journal acceptance rates as well as Journal Impact Factors. The workshop will briefly address books and book chapters as well as other ways we can demonstrate the value and impact of our work.
Registration

Spring 2024 Scholarly Publishing Workshops

These workshops support your publishing and teach you how to make yourself more visible and how to document the impact of your work.

 

 

Get Evidence! Scholarly Metrics for Your PARSE and CV
Thursday March 28, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Covers Google Scholar Profile for citations and Google Scholar for journal rankings, Scimago for journal rankings, Altmetric Attention Scores for social media, and download reports from Academic Works (and other repositories). We’ll also touch on finding individual journal acceptance rates as well as Journal Impact Factors. The workshop will briefly address books and book chapters as well as other ways we can demonstrate the value and impact of our work.
Registration

Get Organized! Zotero Basics
Thursday April 18, 3:30-4:30 PM
Attendees will learn the capabilities of this powerful, free open-source reference management software program. The session covers the functionalities of the Zotero client, adding the Zotero plugin to your browser, and importing citations to generate a bibliography. To maximize our workshop time, please download Zotero from https://www.zotero.org and create your username and password in the Zotero client software by going to EDIT > PREFERENCES > >SYNC
Registration

Author Identifier (ORCID) for Publishing and Grantsmanship
Thursday May 2, 3:00-4:00 PM  
ORCID IDs are author identifiers. They are especially helpful to authors with names that are more common but they have other benefits including speedier registration in systems for submitting articles, reviewing, and grant applications. Grantees who use their ORCID when applying for a grant help to assure that funders connect your funding program to your scholarship. ORCID also helps potential funders to efficiently review your publications.
Registration

Open Publishing
Friday May 10, 12:00-1:00 PM
Faculty Commons, registration tba
There are many paths to open! Learn about resources from CUNY and City Tech library that facilitate authoring preprints, open access monographs and journals, open textbooks, OER, and more. Open publishing makes your research and teaching materials freely available which benefits the broader community and increases your visibility as a scholar and educator.

Our Scholarly Publishing Clinic is available on-demand and during our office hour at 4 PM every first Tuesday of the month. We provide one-on-one consultations as well as workshops that fit your schedule. Find more scholarly communications and publishing support from the library on our website. Questions? Contact Prof. Monica Berger mberger@citytech.cuny.edu

 

Workshop, Dec. 5, Get Organized! Zotero Basics

Zotero logo Get Organized! Zotero Basics
Dec. 5, 4-5 PM
Attendees will learn the capabilities of this powerful, free open-source reference management software program. The session covers the functionalities of the Zotero client, adding the Zotero plugin to your browser, and importing citations to generate a bibliography. To maximize our workshop time, please download Zotero from https://www.zotero.org and create your username and password in the Zotero client software by going to EDIT > PREFERENCES > >SYNC
Registration

Open Access and knowledge as a public good

Open Access Week 2023 Open access is not a business model; rather, it is a philosophy and ethos as well as a practice. It expanded and came into full maturity in the mid-aughts after its initial development during the 1990s, followed by several years of innovation in the early-aughts. During this era (the early 2000s), the movement grew significant enough that a turning point had been reached; stakeholders in scholarly communications came together to issue a series of three declarations supporting open access. These three declarations are, in shorthand, called the 3Bs: Budapest (BOAI) (2002), Bethesda (2003), and Berlin (2003).

The concept of knowledge as a public good is referenced in the BOAI:

“An old tradition and a new technology have converged to make possible an unprecedented public good. The old tradition is the willingness of scientists and scholars to publish the fruits of their research in scholarly journals without payment, for the sake of inquiry and knowledge.”

Open access is at its essence a philosophical notion with the guiding principle that scholarly content should be available to all readers without restriction because knowledge itself is a public good and cannot be bought and sold.  The idea of knowledge as a public good derives from the work of Charlotte Hess and Elinor Ostrom’s conception of knowledge-as-commons.

Peter Suber provided an excellent overview of this important economic concept in an essay, originally published in the SPARC Open Access Newsletter (Nov. 2, 2009), reprinted in Knowledge Unbound: Selected Writings on Open Access, 2002–2011. In brief, a public good is “non-rivalrous and non-excludable,” meaning that it is non-competitive and available to anyone and unaffected by consumption. New knowledge only adds to existing knowledge, and anyone can gain knowledge by learning in varied ways. It is important to differentiate knowledge as a public good versus knowledge captured in texts which are not a public good. Suber argued that when knowledge in text form is digital, it is no longer rivalrous or excludable. Unfortunately, the scholarly publishing system has not evolved to embrace this ethos.

Open access journals, according to the BOAI, “will not charge subscription or access fees, and will turn to other methods for covering their expenses.” This proviso related to “other methods” is important to subsequent discussion of the various models for open access publishing and how article processing charges (author fees) fit in. Open access publishing has increasingly taken the form of a business and this year’s theme for Open Access Week is Community over Commercialization.

When open access is positioned as a business model that will solve the problem of overpriced journals, this interpretation of open access has proven troubled. Open access has not resulted in moderating journal pricing, whether for subscriptions or, in our current environment, author fees for immediate open access. The 20th anniversary of the BOIA declares that diamond open access, open access without fees to authors, should be supported instead of commercialized open access. Lastly, let’s not forget that platforms like CUNY Academic Works also allow us to share our work freely.

this blog post is adapted from my forthcoming book (Winter/Spring 2024) from the Association of College and Research Libraries.

We’re running our annual Academic Works Demystified workshop next week, Nov. 1, 4-5 PM. The workshop addresses what is Academic Works and how it benefits you as a scholar. You will learn more about how and why publishers allow you to contribute to Academic Works and the many benefits to sharing your scholarship openly to you, your students, and the public. The workshop will be on Zoom.

Fall 2023 Scholarly Publishing Workshops

Here is our schedule of workshops for Fall 2023 related to scholarly publishing. These workshops introduce tools, resources, and important knowledge that help faculty make informed choices about their scholarship and how to maximize the impact of their work.

Leveraging the Literature Review
October 13, 12-1:30 PM  
Learn how to find target journals for publishing your work; get a quick bird’s eye view of your topic; review basics of using the library for the literature review; effectively use Google Scholar, citation managers, and link resolvers; quickly assess a journal and avoid predatory journals. Registration via Faculty Commons tba

Academic Works Demystified
Nov. 1, 4-5 PM
What is Academic Works and how does it benefit you as a scholar? You will learn more about how and why publishers allow you to contribute to Academic Works and the many benefits to sharing your scholarship openly to you, your students, and the public.
Registration

Get Organized! Zotero Basics
Dec. 5, 4-5 PM
Attendees will learn the capabilities of this powerful, free open-source reference management software program. The session covers the functionalities of the Zotero client, adding the Zotero plugin to your browser, and importing citations to generate a bibliography. To maximize our workshop time, please download Zotero from https://www.zotero.org and create your username and password in the Zotero client software by going to EDIT > PREFERENCES > >SYNC
Registration

Google Scholar Profile
Dec. 13, 11 AM -12 PM
Google Scholar Profiles provide an easy way for you to showcase your individual scholarship and, more importantly, easily examine who is citing your work and find citation counts.
Registration

Our Scholarly Publishing Clinic is available on-demand and during our office hour at 4 PM every first Tuesday of the month. We provide one-on-one consultations as well as workshops that fit your schedule.

Find more scholarly communications and publishing support from the library on our website.

Questions? Contact Prof. Monica Berger, Library, at mberger@citytech.cuny.edu

Faculty Workshop, 5/16: Who Is This Weird Publisher? Avoiding Predatory Journals and Conferences

Question marksWho Is This Weird Publisher? Avoiding Predatory Journals and Conferences
Tuesday May 16, 2:30-3:30 PM
Predatory journals and conferences are a hot topic but frequently misunderstood. We’ll debunk some myths and learn more about predatory journal and conference characteristics as well as how to thoughtfully evaluate a journal or conference before submitting. This workshop will include hands-on activities.
Registration

Faculty Workshop, 5/5: Author Identifier (ORCID) for Publishing and Grantsmanship

ORCID author identifierAuthor Identifier (ORCID) for Publishing and Grantsmanship
(Express Workshop: 30 minutes)
Thursday May 4, 3:00-4:00 PM  
ORCID IDs are author identifiers. They are especially helpful to authors with names that are more common but they have other benefits including speedier registration in systems for submitting articles, reviewing, and grant applications. Grantees who use their ORCID when applying for a grant help to assure that funders connect your funding program to your scholarship. ORCID also helps potential funders to efficiently review your publications.
Registration