Hammerhead

Part of Speech- Noun

Definition: another way or term for hamerkop; a brown African marshbird related to the storks, which has a crest that looks like a backward projection of the head, and constructs an enormous nest.

Source: Dictionary.com

Found in Choi Jeong Min by Franny Choi

This particular word had me confuse while reading the poem because, at first I though it was referring to the striking part of an hammer, then i thought of hammerhead shark. So I had to look it up to see exactly which meaning of the word fits best for what the poet was trying to say.  I figure hammerhead or hamerkop was just a metaphor for who ever was calling her name, since an hamerkop has a long bird beak.

 

Reclamation

Part of Speech- Noun

Source: Dictionary.com

Definition:  the act or process of reclaiming

Found in spoken word poem Hair by Elizabeth Acevedo

The definition of the word reclamation, helped me get a clearer more understanding of that specific sentence in the poem.  Acevedo’s message is don’t try to fix something that isn’t broken. She speaking to everyone whether u are Latina, black or what ever race, don’t ever listen to what someone else has to say and that you don’t have to change anything about yourself or appearance.

Cadence

Cadence

Part of Speech: noun

Definition: a rhythmic sequence or flow of sounds in language

Source: Merriam Webster Dictionary

Found In: “Not a Mile” by Andrew Grace line 22

I looked up the word Cadence because of curiosity of its meaning. knowing its definition helped the poem be more understanding to me

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cadence

Trusses

Trusses

Part Of Speech: Verb

Definition: to secure tightly, to bind.

Source: Merriam Webster Dictionary

Found in: “hair” by Elizabeth Acevedo

Trusses

Part Of Speech: Noun

Definition: an assemblage of members (such as beams) forming a rigid framework

Source: Merriam Webster Dictionary

Found in: “hair” by Elizabeth Acevedo

I chose this word because it can be used in two different contexts.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/trusses

 

 

 

Gluttony

Gluttony

Part of Speech : Noun

Definition: Excess eating or Drinking

Source: Merriam Webster Dictionary

Found In: ” Choi Jeong Min” line 35

I chose the word Gluttony because i was not sure of the meaning.

link: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gluttony

Smoldering

Smoldering

Part of speech : Verb

Definition: to burn sluggishly, without flame, and often with much smoke. another meaning is to show suppressed anger, hate, or jealousy

Source: Merriam Webster Dictionary

Found In “Choi Jeong Min” line 13

I looked up the word smothering because of the way it was used in the line.  in the poem it seems like it was used to describe a feeling.

Reclamation

Reclamation

Part of speech: Noun

Source: Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Definition: The act or process of reclaiming something

Found in spoken word poem “Hair” by Elizabeth Acevedo : ” Hair, a reclamation

The definition of the word reclamation helped me understand what was trying to be said. In the lines, after “Hair, a reclamation” it states : ” how I will break pride down their back, so from the moment they leave out the womb they will be born in love with themselves.” In other words, their hair shouldn’t define who they are. They shouldn’t have to change it to satisfy anyone but there own selves. To stop living up to others peoples changes and embrace yourself.

My Thoughts on Spoken Word Poetry

Prior to taking this class, I was familiar with spoken word poetry. It’s actually the only kind of poetry that I enjoy. I’ve gone to an open mic night at the Nuyorican Cafe in the Lower East Side a few years back. It was definitely a unique experience that I would like to repeat. The passion the poets speak with is something that the audience can feel, I certainly felt it.  I enjoy spoken word because I feel like there’s more feeling or emotion in the poem. There’s something about a poem being performed that makes it different to me than one that is  meant to be read. My least favorite poems are those written in Shakespeare’s time. I find them extremely difficult to understand as the English language was different then. I particularly enjoyed Franny Choi’s “Choi Jeong Min”. This poem spoke to me because I can relate to it. As a minority and being raised by immigrant parents, I can relate to the difficulties she experienced with her Korean name. My parents thought carefully about the names they gave me and my siblings for the reason of not being discriminated against. They knew we’d face enough difficulties being minorities and dark skinned, they didn’t want to add to that by giving us a traditional Dominican name difficult to pronounce in English like Nicaury.

She also speaks about American’s stealing our culture and selling it back to us for profit. This is something I feel strongly about and was happy to know that another minority group experiences the same as us blacks and Hispanics. Another reason I enjoy spoken word is because it reminds me of my favorite music genre, hip-hop. In hip-hop music, artist not only rhyme words but speak about real life issues. Rappers like Tupac, Common and Mos Def use a style of rapping that sounds very similar to spoken word poetry. Songs like Dear Mama and Ghetto Gospel by Tupac are indeed rap songs but have a different flow or tone and its delivery is more like spoken word poetry. I personally don’t write poetry. I tried when I was younger but wasn’t really interested in it. Although I enjoy spoken word, I don’t listen to it or watch it often. I really enjoyed the film Louder Than a Bomb because it broke the stereotype of who or what a poet should be or look like. I love that those kids used poetry as a therapeutic tool to deal with their personal issues as well as a hobby. Some even their poetry a little more seriously than others, which to me is amazing because where they came from I can imagine is very easy to get caught up in negativity.

Blog Post #3: Your Thoughts on Spoken Word Poetry

Blog Post #3—My Thoughts on Spoken Word Poetry

Must be posted by Mon, December 17, 2018 by 11:59 pm

Assignment: Write a blog post of about 200 words (at least 2 strong paragraphs) in which you react to studying spoken word poetry.  Here are some questions you might consider in writing your post.  Here are some questions to help you write a focused post.  You don’t need to answer all of these questions, but a strong post will respond to a few of them:

  • Which spoken word poems that we read were your favorites, which didn’t you connect with?
  • What did you think of the film we watched, Louder Than a Bomb (2011)? What surprised you about it?  What did you learn from it?
  • Do you prefer spoken word poetry over older kinds of texts? Or vice versa?  Why?  Give examples of texts to help us understand your preference.
  • Do you write spoken word poetry? If so, would you like to share a poem with the class? Feel free to post it and talk about what inspired it.
  • Do you think you could perform spoken word poetry: why or why not?
  • Are there other spoken word poets whose work you know that you would like to introduce to the class? If so, feel free to introduce us to his or her work and tell us how you found it, and what you find compelling about it.
  • Are there connections between spoken word poetry and contemporary music, like rap or hip hop? Write about specific songs, artists, poets, or texts.
  • Have you ever been to a spoken word performance? Where and when?  What was it like? If not, do you think you would go to one in the future? Why or why not?

Please title your Post, My Thoughts on Spoken Word Poetry and choose Blog Post #3 as a category when you post.

Remember to comment on at least one other student’s blog post by December 19th at 11:59 pm. 

 

 

 

Hammerhead

Hammerhead

Part of Speech: Noun

Definition: It’s actually another term for hamerkop; a brown African marshbird related to the storks, which has a crest that looks like a backward projection of the head, and constructs an enormous nest

Source: Oxford Dictionaries

Found in ” Choi Jeong Min “, line 4

I looked it up because I was sure that it had nothing to do with the hammerhead shark and wanted to clarify what it is.