The Extraordinary Educators of the SEEK Program

Insurgent Knowledge: The Poetics and Pedagogy of Toni Cade Bambara, June Jordan, Audre Lorde, and Adrienne Rich in the Era of Open Admissions is a wonderful dissertation, soon to be book, written by CUNY grad Danica B. Savonick. This post is based on her work.

In 1965, CUNY established the Search for Education, Elevation, and Knowledge Program (SEEK) to recruit and prepare “economically and educationally disadvantaged” students to matriculate at City College. SEEK provided students not only with free tuition and free books, but also a stipend that addressed the material conditions of students’ lives beyond the classroom.

By 1968, four extraordinary women were teaching basic writing classes for SEEK down the hall from one another. Audre Lorde, June Jordan, Toni Cade Bambara, and Adrienne Rich all taught for SEEK in the late 1960s and early 1970s. These writers/activists/teachers shared a belief in the teaching of writing as a transformative, political, and creative process.

Lorde, Jordan, Bambara, and Rich observed how students who entered the university through SEEK at first distrusted them, and how many had been mistreated by previous educators. All of them saw the oppressive dynamics inherent in traditional classroom set-ups. They shared a fundamental respect for their students, and they understood that many of them had been disempowered in previous classrooms. They listened to students and changed their approaches to teaching based on what they heard. They sought to be allies for their SEEK students, not saviors there to liberate oppressed students.

Together, they experimented with how the classroom might be a space of collective social change. Together, they explored how education can contribute to building a more just and equitable world. They believed in the transformative power of education and saw how their teaching could contribute to the Women’s Movement, the Civil Rights Movement, and the movement for Black Power.

Lorde, Jordan, Bambara, and Rich created a collaborative environment for teaching and writing. They exchanged syllabi, lesson plans, and assignments and sat in on each other’s classes. They deliberately researched and invented teaching strategies that would help working class students, first-generation students, and students of color. Their groundbreaking collaborative work at SEEK has had a profound impact on the teaching of writing, and is now considered of great theoretical importance.

“I teach myself in outline,” Notes, Journals, Syllabi, & an Excerpt from Deotha, is a collection of Audre Lorde’s teaching materials from her time at CUNY.

June Jordan: “Life Studies,” 1966-1976 includes texts from her time at SEEK.

June Jordan

A photograph of June Jordan

June Jordan was a powerhouse poet, activist, journalist, and educator. One of the most widely-published and highly-acclaimed writers of her time, Jordan was active in the civil rights, feminist, antiwar, and gay and lesbian rights movements. Through her poetry, essays, plays, and children’s literature, she spoke passionately about race, class, sexuality, and political struggles around the world.

Jordan was born in Harlem in 1936, the child of Jamaican immigrants who raised her in Bedford-Stuyvesant. A gifted student, she began writing poetry in elementary school. She attended boarding school in New England, where her teachers encouraged her writing but never shared the work of any Black writers with her. After earning a BA from Barnard College, Jordan began teaching at the City College of New York in 1966. She published her first book of poetry, Who Look at Me, in 1969. She went on to teach at Yale University, Sarah Lawrence College, and the State University of New York at Stony Brook, before becoming Professor of African-American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, where she founded Poetry For the People.

Jordan’s essays were published in magazines and newspapers around the world. She also published more than twenty-five major works of poetry, fiction, and children’s books before her death in 2002. In an interview shortly before her death, Jordan said that “the task of a poet of color, a black poet, as a people hated and despised, is to rally the spirit of your folks…I have to get myself together and figure out an angle, a perspective, that is an offering, that other folks can use to pick themselves up, to rally and to continue or, even better, to jump higher, to reach more extensively in solidarity with even more varieties of people to accomplish something. I feel that it’s a spirit task.”

Jordan’s books of poetry include the collections Kissing God Goodbye: Poems, 1991-1997, Haruko/Love Poems, Naming Our Destiny, Living Room: New Poems 1980-1984, and Things That I Do in the Dark. Her essay collections include Affirmative Acts: Political Essays, June Jordan’s Poetry for the People: A Revolutionary Blueprint, Technical Difficulties, and Civil Wars: Selected Essays 1963-1980.

You can access several online, full text works by Jordan in the City Tech Collection, including:

Life as Activism: June Jordan’s Writings from the Progressive

Some of Us Did Not Die: New and Selected Essays of June Jordan.

Coded Bias Screening Wednesday, May 12 at 1:00PM

The library is hosting a free virtual screening of the award-winning film Coded Bias, on Wednesday, May 12th at 1:00PM, open to City Tech faculty and students. Coded Bias, directed by Shalini Kantayya, explores the work of Joy Buolamwini, a MIT Media lab researcher who discovers that facial recognition does not “see” dark-skinned faces. The film documents Buolamwini’s effort to advocate for the ban of technological bias and algorithms. The documentary film was released in 2020 and has a running time of 83 minutes.

You can register here: http://cityte.ch/codedbias using your City Tech email address.

For more information, you can contact Prof. Junior Tidal, Library Department – jtidal@citytech.cuny.edu

Official Site

Invisible Women in Women’s History Month

It’s March, which means it is Women’s History Month, a commemoration of “the specific achievements women have made over the course of American history in a variety of fields”…with one notable exception: the field of domestic labor.

Domestic labor—cooking, cleaning, childcare, and other activities related to household maintenance—remains largely invisible and undervalued. Domestic labor is mostly done by women, and particularly women of color, who keep those around them fed, safe, clean, and cared for. It is essential work, without which no other economic activity could take place, but it is considered unworthy, for example, of being an achievement to celebrate during Women’s History Month.

Photograph of Wages for Housework supporters at an International Women’s Day march in New York City,
Wages for Housework supporters at an International Women’s Day march in New York City, 1977. Photo by: Freda Weinland.

Silvia Federici, who was one of the organizers of the Wages for Housework movement, has described domestic labor as “a form of gendered economic oppression and an exploitation upon which all of capitalism rests.” Domestic labor enables others to work outside the home, and to enjoy higher status jobs and better wages. It is the invisible work that makes all other work possible.

If women in the United States earned minimum wage for their unpaid domestic labor, they would have made $1.5 trillion last year, according to a recent article in the New York Times. Imagine what would happen if women either refused to do any domestic labor or insisted on being paid for it. Our entire economy would be transformed.

Of course, some people are paid for doing domestic labor. During the past three decades, as more and more women entered the workforce, those with enough income (usually white, college-educated, and middle to upper class) began to pay others to help care for their children or clean their homes or even buy their groceries for them. The majority of domestic workers in the United States are low-waged women of color and immigrants. Women with privilege working outside the home have depended on outsourcing domestic labor to women with less privilege. Even though there have been efforts to organize and protect domestic workers from exploitation, they don’t have much protection, and are often denied formal benefits and time off to care for their own families.

During the last year, with schools and offices closed and an New York State executive order that classified most domestic workers as “inessential”, more people had to perform their own domestic labor rather than outsourcing it. Many women with privilege have been forced to quit their jobs, as they can no longer hire domestic workers to help them. Because of the pandemic, some have become more aware that their careers and comfortable lifestyles depend on the underpaid labor of undervalued domestic workers. It seems like a good moment to reevaluate the low value assigned to life-maintaining labor and to start celebrating women for all of the kinds of work they do.

Want to learn more about women and work? Check out these ebooks from the City Tech Library!

[This post was co-authored with City Tech Librarians Nora Almeida and Wanett Clyde.]

Controlled Digital Lending and the Open Library

Controlled Digital Lending

Loaning materials to patrons is a fundamental role of any library. The current COVID-19 pandemic has created an urgent need for libraries to find new ways of providing access to their collections. With many libraries now closed, patron demand for digital materials is higher than ever. As a result, many libraries have turned to Controlled Digital Lending in order to provide materials that their communities cannot access in any other way. 

City Tech Library is one of 18 CUNY libraries partnering with the Open Library, a project of the Internet Archive, to provide Controlled Digital Lending access to our collections.  Controlled Digital Lending (CDL) is the digital equivalent of traditional library lending. Under CDL, libraries own physical materials but make them available as digital copies. Libraries can digitize their books and lend out digital versions in place of print items. CDL has three core principles:

  1. A library must own a legal copy of the physical book.
  2. The library must maintain an “owned to loaned” ratio, lending no more copies than it legally owns.
  3. The library must use technical measures to ensure that the digital file cannot be copied or redistributed. 

The “fair use” section of copyright law allows libraries to responsibly lend materials through CDL. As long as the terms of loans are limited, and digitized books are locked so borrowers can’t download or otherwise copy them, libraries using CDL are within the boundaries of the law.

Michelle Wu, an attorney and law librarian, developed the concept of CDL. Her model of CDL had several goals, including:

  • Making print materials easier to discover;
  • Providing more efficient delivery of library resources;
  • Creating digital formats that are more accessible to those with disabilities; and/or
  • Preserving and protecting library collections, providing access to materials during natural disasters, severe weather, and health emergencies.

This short video is a fantastic explanation of CDL. 

Open Library  

Eighteen CUNY libraries, including City Tech, have partnered with the Open Library, a book digitization project of the Internet Archive that provides access to millions of books. Over 770,000 print books in CUNY collections across are now linked in OneSearch to electronic versions freely available in the Open Library. 

The browseable list of subjects can be found at http://openlibrary.org/subjects and the advanced search can be found at https://openlibrary.org/advancedsearch.

Once you create a free account, you may borrow up to ten books at a time for browsing (1 hour) or borrowing (14 days).  To borrow materials, please register for an account at: http://openlibrary.org/account/create and then go directly to the Borrowing landing page at http://openlibrary.org/borrow

Titles that are available will have the “Read in Browser” link, where users can borrow, download, and read in a variety of formats such as BookReader, Adobe Digital Editions, PDF, text, ePub, and Kindle editions. Most ebook reading platforms are available online for free download. Books with a lock icon are available to persons who are blind or with vision loss.

What’s New Spring 2021 in Podcast Form

We have released a new episode of City Tech Stories that highlights new happenings and workshops for the spring 2021 semester. Listen below!

City Tech Stories – Podcast episode 8 – What’s New Spring 2021

Transcribed by College Assistant Yu Lau

Junior: Welcome to City Tech Stories, a podcast highlighting the experiences and voices of the City Tech community. Each episode will center around a theme and include perspectives across the college. My name is Junior Tidal and I’m the web services and multimedia librarian for City Tech. This episode is about what’s new in the library in the Spring 2021 semester. First up is our new modern library system which has changed how we access library resources off campus. Faculty and students need to use our CUNY login credentials to access library databases off campus. You can use the MyLibrary account link on the library website. Students and faculty no longer need to activate their ID before logging into databases off campus either. Did you know you can change your preferred name on your CUNYFirst account? This will associate your preferred name with your library account. You can do this by logging into CUNYFirst and updating your account information. If you have other questions about checking out materials from the library while campus is closed, you can check out our frequently asked questions page on the library website.

Want to return the mountain of library books you borrowed last year? The library book drop has been moved downstairs to just inside the 60 Tillary St entrance of the college. Any CUNY library books, CD, DVD, or VHS that is in a case may be placed inside the book drop. If you have any other questions about returning materials at City Tech, you can email us at NYCCTcirculation, that’s all one word, @citytech.cuny.edu.

Did you know the library hosts workshops? We have a wide variety of workshops that you can attend via Zoom. The first workshop, Power Searching What You Need To Know, will be hosted on Tuesday, March 21st at 3 pm. This workshop conducted by Professor Nandi Prince will provide tips on advance searching and how to it efficiently. We will also cover how to organize your results. Our other workshop is an APA citation workshop. This workshop will teach the importance of documenting sources when incorporating other’s research into your own. Learn the fundamentals of using the APA style, this workshop will be held on Thursday, April 8th at 3 pm.

Do you know about ZoteroBib? ZoteroBib is a software program what will help you create a bibliography when you write. The program allows you to generate citations in popular styles when you write including APA and MLA instantly. This workshop will show our participates how to export your completed bibliography to your paper. It’ll be held on Monday, April 19th at 4:00 PM.

Planning on doing a poster presentation? Our poster presentation will show you how to layout content and make quantitative data pop and review the best practices for ascending poster design. The poster design workshop will be held on April 20th at 3:00 PMB.

Ever wonder what Google thinks of what kind of person you are based on the ads you see? Does Facebook accurately reflect your true self? Our library workshop called Algorithmic Autobiographies and Fictions will explore how social media platforms and search engines create identities of our digital selves. Participates will learn about search engines and social media algorithms, how to access their ad preferences for Google, Facebook, and Instagram, and then create a short story, poem, drawing or other creative product about their algorithmic self. The workshop will conclude on ways to keep your ad preferences private. It’s not necessary but highly recommended that workshop attendees have a Google, Facebook, or Instagram account. This workshop has been adapted from the work of Dr. Sophie Bishop and Dr. Tanya Camp. It will be held on Wednesday, April 21st at 2:00 PM.

At the end of the semester, we will also have drop-in research sessions. These will be held on Monday, May 3rd at noon and Thursday, May 6th at 3:00 pm. We will also have an upcoming Linkedin and resume writing workshop which will be announced shortly. If you need help with your research or writing a resume, these workshops are for you.

Besides library workshops, the library also hosts open education resource workshops. These will be conducted remotely over Zoom. Part time faculty who participate will be compensated at their hourly, non-teaching adjunct rate for their time. The first workshop, Introduction to OER and the open textbook library, will be held on March 2nd from 10:00 to 11:30 AM. Peer Review and the OER Landscape workshop will be offered on Tuesday, March 23rd at 10 AM and Wednesday, March 24th at 2:00 PM. This workshop will examine existing and possible approaches to peer review evaluating open educational materials and scholarly engagement around OER creation. Participates will explore some current models from the open textbook library, Merlot, and Rebus community. Participates are encouraged to bring questions and no level of familiarity with OER is required. Our creating and customizing OER workshops will be offered on two dates that include Tuesday, April 20th from 10 AM to 11:30 AM and Wednesday April 21st from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM. If you want to learn how to get started with customizing and creating OERs, this is the workshop for you. Participates will learn tips and best practices, platform publishing venues and ways to showcase work.

Besides workshops, the library can also support you in finding things that we may not have. You can use interlibrary loan to continue to fill article and individual book chapter requests and deliver them electronically. ILL is great for scholarly research and course assignments. Because many other libraries are closed across the country, we might not be able to fill all your requests, but we’ll try our best. If you have questions, you can email us at interlibaryloan@citytech.cuny.edu.

Besides ILL, we can also support you for your scholarly publishing. Do you need help with any aspect of scholarly publishing? Our scholarly publishing clinic is available for virtual consolations. Learn how to pick the best journal or publisher for your article or book, retain rights as an author, create a Google scholar profile or search alert, or use Academic works and citations managers and more. Office hours are by appointment, every last Thursday of each month this semester at noon via Zoom or over the phone. If you would like some consolation regarding scholarly publishing, contact Professor Monica Berger or you can email Professor Berger through the library website.

If you need further help, including research needs or any other library services, you can access the library’s 24/7 chat reference service. Go onto the library website, https://library.citytech.cuny.edu, our chat reference is available Monday through Thursday, 10:00 AM to 7:00 PM and Fridays, 10:00 AM through 5:00 PM. Outside of those hours, you can connect to other librarians. We can help your research strategy, finding pop sources for your project and evaluating information, citations and more. If you’d like to get in touch via email, you can also email asknycctref@cuny.libanswers.com, that’s asknycctref@cuny.libanswers.com.

Thanks for listening to City Tech Stories. You can continue to listen to us anywhere you get your podcasts and be sure to hit the subscribe button. Thanks.

African American Studies Department presents “Black Lives Lead: We, Too, Sing America!” Virtual Exhibit

The African American Studies (AFR) Department at CityTech presents a virtual exhibit to celebrate Black History Month, entitled Black Lives Lead: We, Too, Sing America! See the exhibit below. (Transcript forthcoming).


Dr. Yelena Bailey, AFR Adjunct, is the author of the newly published How the Streets Were Made (UNC Press). Join Dr. Bailey as she uses historical and contemporary photographs to examine the creation of “the streets” not just as a physical, racialized space produced by segregationist policies, but also as a sociocultural entity that continues to shape our understanding of Blackness in America.

Transcript

2021 Black History Month Virtual Exhibit, Black Lives Lead: We, Too, Sing America!
Transcribed by College Assistant Yu Lau

My name is Dr. Yelena Bailey and I am so grateful to have this opportunity to share a little bit with you about my book project How the Streets Were Made: Housing Segregation and Black Life in America. I want to thank the Department of African American Studies for making this possible and extending the invitation. I also want to thank the City Tech library for cosponsoring this event. You’re going to hear me, um, do a voice over and show you some images of kind of Black urban space in my hometown of Minneapolis-Saint Paul area.

Many of you will be familiar, um, with the Twin Cities that were in the news this past year with the murder of George Floyd and I think that, um, those events are closely tied to my book and the main ideas there. So I am going to walk through some of that and then I am also going to share with you the ways in which one of the authors I talk about in the book, Ann Petry, shows us that these places can also be spaces of liberation and empowerment.

Soon after musician Nipsey Hussle was murdered on March 31, 2019, social media was flooded with the reactions of Black artists, authors, and activists mourning his death. In the wake of this loss, writer and creative strategist Duanecia Evans tweeted, “The hood is a construct. The deepest underbelly of survival and poverty. The science project of classism and elitism. If you get out you have survivors’ guilt forever, if you stay in… man. Ain’t no middle.” This description of the hood or the streets is something more than physical geography is the heart of this book.

How the Streets Were Made examines the streets as a sociocultural construct that stems from the U.S. geographic segregation and continues to define the contours of Blackness and belonging in the U.S. today. This notion of the streets resonates with me on a personal level. Although I did not grow up in the streets, I was raised by a mother whose parenting was in no small way shaped by her determination to keep me from them.

My mother spent most of her childhood in the projects of North Minneapolis. She is intimately familiar with the streets and the threats they pose to Black life. She’s equally familiar with the way such spaces foster community and belonging. Although my mother made it out of the hood, throughout my childhood she was painfully aware of just how little separated us from that life. This awareness created a ferocious determination in her.

Although we did not have much money, she was resolved to keep me from the fate of other poor Black folks. This often meant moving us from place to place, actively fighting against the social, economic, and cultural forces that attempted to corral us back into poor urban neighborhoods. Even we lived in the projects, my mother moved us across town just so we could get into one of the few available suburban public housing projects. We may have been poor; she would be damned if I didn’t get a middle-class education. When those housing and school opportunity ran out, my mother was willing to relocate to another suburb or another area of the city. I say this not to exalt her as an example of exceptional perseverance but rather to highlight the way the streets, even in their strict absence, radically shaped my childhood.

My mother accepted a life of transience just so her daughter could have a shot at a decent education and a childhood free from the violence of the streets. Reflecting on my own experience has helped me to recognize the streets as much more than a physical space.

How the Streets Were Made explains why racialized spaces like the streets exist and why it is that urban and ghetto most often signify Black. The streets have shaped perceptions of Black identity, community, violence, spending habits, and belonging. They produce myths about urban Black pathology, financial irresponsibility, and inherent violence. These myths have fielded the economic and social divestment of Black communities as well as a boarder divestment from Blackness as a part of U.S. identity. How the Streets Were Made explores these topics as well as how we might approach the topic of redress in a practical and robust way.

While How the Streets Were Made explores the history of geographic segregation and how that lead to narratives that negatively impact Black life, often reinforcing economic disparities, it is also a book about how Black people have fought against these forces and how racism takes place. George Lipsitz argues that people who do not control physical places often construct discursive space as sites of agency, affiliation, and imagination. In the case of Black urban inhabitance, literature became one of the primary means through which Black intellectuals constructed these discursive spaces. While government policies, economic rationales, and marketing campaign worked to create a derogatory narrative around urban Blackness, Black authors were simultaneously wrestling with the cultural and ideological impact of living in racialized urban spaces.

In chapter two of my book, I analyze Ann Petry’s The Street, a novel that exemplifies the way the streets have been depicted and theorized in African American literature. Ann Petry published The Street in 1946, just twelve years after the National Housing Act was established. Set in 1944 Harlem, the novel follows the journey of the protagonist, Lutie Johnson, as she attempts to build a life for herself and her son Bub. Lutie migrated to Harlem after her marriage fell apart.

Determined to work her way up the social ladder, Lutie pursues a number of careers all while her son Bub finds himself alone on the streets. The novel is a tragedy that highlights the specific impact the streets have on Black familial relationships and the pursuit of the American dream. More relevant, however, is the way Petry works to narrate the transformation of A street, 116th in Harlem, from the figurative representation of everyday life in Black spaces in a menacing sociocultural entity, The street. Despite the harsh realities of the streets, depicted in the novel, they are also depicted as a safe space where Black people build community and live free from the constricting gaze of White supremacy. There is a moment in the novel when the protagonist, Lutie, is returning to Harlem after working in another part of the city and she expresses the sentiment in a clear nuanced way.

Rather than summarize it, I’ll read a short excerpt because Petry’s skill as an author is highlighted here and is a primary example of what I mean when I say that Black authors were using their writing to claim space. The book narrates that Lutie got off the train, thinking that she never really felt human until she reached Harlem and thus, got away from the hostility in the eyes of the White women who stared at her on the downtown streets and in the subway, escaped from the openly appraising looks of the White men whose eyes seem to go through her clothing to her long brown legs. These other folks felt the same way, she thought, that once they are freed from the contempt in the eyes of the downtown world, they instantly become individuals. Up here, they are no longer creatures labeled simply colored and therefore, alike. She noticed that once the crowd walked the length of the platform and started up the stairs towards the street, it expanded in size. The same people who had made themselves small on the train, even on the platform, suddenly grew so large, they could hardly get up the stairs to the street together. She reached the street at the very end of the crowd and stood watching them as they scattered in all directions, laughing and talking to each other. This is a powerful moment, both within the text and outside of it. In the novel, this realization stands in stark contrast to Lutie’s fears for her son, the dark dank apartment she lives in, and the harassment she receives on a daily basis as a Black woman. Harlem becomes a safe space where she is free to be herself and to feel fully human.

Outside of the novel, Petry uses Lutie’s realization to reclaim Black space, even space that was initially created through anti-Black policies. She writes these spaces as fostering community and freedom. This passage in Petry’s novel reminds me of the chant “Whose street, Our street.’’ When Black protesters make this statement, it’s a bold reclaiming of power over the space we live in.

In her book Demonic Grounds, Catherine McKittrick says that Black matters are spatial matters in that we produce space, reproduce its meanings, and we work very hard to make geography what it is. When we look at Black organizers today and the protests that take place in the streets, this is a prime example of giving space meaning, of turning the streets into a space of liberation.

Resources from the Professional Development Center

The Professional Development Center (PDC) helps City Tech students and alumni cultivate essential skills for achieving their personal and professional objectives. During Spring 2021, PDC is offering Front Desk Appointments, Virtual Drop-in Hours, and many other services including the Four Year Road Map.

During Front Desk Appointments, Ms. Contreras can help students and alumni with questions relating to professional development. City Tech students and alumni can:

  • Ask general questions relating to professional development and career services
  • Receive assistance with CityTechConnect – Symplicity or resetting your password
  • Access drop-in hours for with a Program Coordinator
  • Receive information about upcoming virtual events and workshops.

PDC’s Virtual Drop-in Hours are conducted via Zoom, on a first-come, first served basis. Sessions are 15 minutes in length. Counselors are available to talk about:

  • One-on-One Career Coaching
  • Resume and Cover Letter Critiques
  • Interview Preparation and Mock Interviews
  • Professional Development Workshops
  • Networking Events
  • Internship Opportunities
  • Employer Information Sessions
  • Graduate School Exploration.

Finally, PDC’s Four-Year Road Map offers recommendations for you to begin learning and exploring your interest and building a path to career achievement. Counselors can work with students as early as their freshman year.

If you are interested in any of the above services, please contact the Professional Development Center at 718-260-5050 or via email at pdc@citytech.cuny.edu.

Anti-Racism Resources

A tintype portrait of a woman from Weeksville, Brooklyn

“A white ally acknowledges the limits of her/his/their knowledge about other people’s experiences but doesn’t use that as a reason not to think and/or act. A white ally does not remain silent but confronts racism as it comes up daily, but also seeks to deconstruct it institutionally and live in a way that challenges systemic oppression, at the risk of experiencing some of that oppression. Being a white ally entails building relationships with both people of color, and also with white people in order to challenge them in their thinking about race. White allies don’t have it all figured out, but are deeply committed to non-complacency.”  White Allyship 101 by the Dismantle Collective

February is Black History Month in the United States. As 2020 demonstrated, the situation of Black people in the US is still challenging, often unfair and discriminatory. One way we can honor the historical struggles of Black Americans is to invest in the ongoing work to make our society and ourselves (if we are not Black) less racist. For nonBlack people, February 2021 is a good opportunity to educate ourselves on how to be better allies to our Black family, friends, and neighbors. There are many excellent educational online materials on Anti-Racism free and open to all:

Films

The PBS website offers several films about racism in America, adding historical context to racial issues. PBS’ programs include profiles of police departments, documentaries that cover the treatment of African Americans since slavery, and films about both past and current civil rights activism.

Readings

The case for reparations

“I used to lead tours on a plantation. You wouldn’t believe the questions I got about slavery.”

Allyship and accountability glossary

Podcasts

1619  An audio series on how slavery has transformed America, connecting past and present through the oldest form of storytelling.

Code Switch: “fearless conversations about race…hosted by journalists of color, our podcast tackles the subject of race head-on. We explore how it impacts every part of society — from politics and pop culture to history, sports and everything in between.”

Seeing White: “Just what is going on with white people? Police shootings of unarmed African Americans. Acts of domestic terrorism by white supremacists. The renewed embrace of raw, undisguised white-identity politics. Unending racial inequity in schools, housing, criminal justice, and hiring. Why? Where did the notion of ‘whiteness’ come from? What does it mean? What is whiteness for?”

Uncivil: “Uncivil brings you stories that were left out of the official history of the Civil War, ransacks America’s past, and takes on the history you grew up with. We bring you untold stories about resistance, covert operations, corruption, mutiny, counterfeiting, antebellum drones, and so much more. And we connect these forgotten struggles to the political battlefield we’re living on right now. The story of the Civil War — the story of slavery, confederate monuments, racism — is the story of America.”

Other Online Resources

The Color Line: “A lesson on the countless colonial laws enacted to create division and inequality based on race.” from the Zinn Education Project

Facing History and Ourselves: “Facing our collective history and how it informs our attitudes and behaviors allows us to choose a world of equity and justice. Facing History’s resources address racism, antisemitism, and prejudice at pivotal moments in history; we help students connect choices made in the past to those they will confront in their own lives.”

Talking About Race is a comprehensive, multimedia site produced by the National Museum of African American History & Culture, with rich offerings.

Weeksville Heritage Center is an historic site in Central Brooklyn that preserves the history of Weeksville, one of the largest free Black communities in pre-Civil War America.

Our own wonderful African American Studies Department has its own list of recommended resources, well worth checking out. Beyond the City Tech campus, there are hundreds of CUNY events celebrating Black History Month.

African-American Studies Department hosts Black Feminist Project and Black Panther events for Black History Month

The African-American Studies Department is hosting two events for Black History Month. See below for more details.

Tanya Denise Fields Keynote Event on Tuesday, Feb. 16. For more information visit https://www.citytech.cuny.edu/african-studies.
Tanya Denise Fields Keynote Event on Tuesday, Feb. 16. For more information visit https://www.citytech.cuny.edu/african-studies.

Tuesday, February 16
2021 BLACK HISTORY MONTH KEYNOTE EVENT

“Black Lives Lead: We, Too, Sing America!” Tanya Denise Fields, Founder & Executive Director of the Black Feminist Project, in conversation with Dr. Emilie Boone View Virtual Event on http://www.citytech.cuny.edu/african-studies/

Black Panther screening on 2/17 with a roundtable discussion on 2/18. Register at http://tiny.cc/va2etz .
Black Panther screening on 2/17 with a roundtable discussion on 2/18. Register at http://tiny.cc/va2etz .


Wednesday, February 17 at 7:00pm
Black Panther Movie Screening with cast member Q&A afterward  

Thursday, February 18 at 7:00pm “Black Panther: The Women Warriors of Wakanda” roundtable conversation with cast members of Avengers: Infinity War and Black Panther