Marketing Wine

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For the Brown Veal stew, I would make a wine that has a medium body, and medium acid content. The reason for this is because of the synergy that these two have together, the way these pairings work is like when you squeeze lemon onto your oysters, or when you add Parmesan cheese over spaghetti marinara that further enhance the dish. The strong flavors of fatty veal, and spices would be more flavorful due to the acid and body of the wine, if you were to take a spoonful of stew and drink wine after it would restart your taste buds, and give the dish a clear flavor instead of being repetitive and one sided, with the wine it would allow those flavors to stand out and highlight the dish.

The best way to train servers to sell the wine would be to know the essential flavors of the wine by describing the notes that come from the varietal of grape and the flavors that come from the earth. To explain how the flavors would combine together and create a different experience compared to having the wine alone or pairing it with the dish. Asking the guest if they prefer a certain wine is also good practice, and giving some background of the wine that is being presented.  

References:

Zraly, K. (2016). Windows on the world complete wine course. New York: Sterling Epicure.

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Sommelier Speak

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Sommelier Speak

Dish:

Brown Veal Stew

Three new wines of the new world that would pair with this dish:

  1. Fielding Hills Estate Riverbend Vineyard Merlot Wahluke Slope 2013
  2. Russian River Valley  Pinot Noir Sonoma-Cutrer 2014
  3. Dakota Shy Cabernet Sauvignon Napa Valley 2014

Characteristic and viticulture/vinification of Pinot Noir from Sonoma California.

California Pinot Noir tend to have a clear appearance with a garnet and ruby color, this wines tend to be a little more whole body providing a medium viscosity. On the Nose it’s clean with a high intensity giving off fruit forward notes of strawberry and raspberry with undertones of earth, wood, and pepper with a medium plus alcohol. On the palate it’s clean, light intensity with ripe fruit, and cherry being the prominent flavor, with a medium acidic finish and high mineral content. This wine would pair perfectly with the veal dish because of the rich body, and high in acid finish. Picture takes a flavorful bite of this fatty veal and rich sauce, afterwards taking a sip of this wine to clean your palate and restart all those flavors on your second bite.

 

Sonoma has a abundant amount of sunshine, warm daytime weather with cool evening and a long growing season that are all prime conditions for growing different types of grape varieties. The soil in this area (russian river valley) tends to be filled with limestone and chalk contributing to the wines light finish, and acid due to being close to the river, allowing the grabs to not ripening as much and allowing sugars to produce. Harvest normally happens a little earlier in this area starting off in september and ending at the start of November.

References.

Zraly, K. (2016). Windows on the world complete wine course. New York: Sterling Epicure.

Chalk Hill Wine Region and Appellation. (n.d.). Retrieved October 15, 2017, from http://www.sonomacounty.com/articles/chalk-hill-wine-region-and-appellation

 

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Marketing Wine

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  • For the entrée, Baked Fish Fillet with Tomatoes and Mushrooms, I believe that the white wine with a light body, high in acidity, along with a crisp and refreshing flavor would pair wonderfully with this menu item. In order to create a wine with such qualities, it is important to consider that such wine needs to have less residual sugar content, lower alcohol and higher acidity level, like Riesling. To achieve this goal, it is also important to consider that climate and growing conditions of the grape variety will help to create a delicious wine. In this case, all the grapes must be grown in cool to cold climates, and must be young aged wine, so that it could have its fresh and crisp flavors to it. Since, the alcohol content is the primary contributor to the body of wine, it is also important to consider the amounts of residual sugar in a wine. More sugar would mean that there is more sugar to transform into more alcohol, while less sugar means that there is a less sugar to transform into alcohol. Lastly, to mention, white wines must be fermented in temperature-controlled tanks at 50°F to 65°F. “Temperature-controlled stainless-steel tanks are usually double-skinned, wrapped on the outside with a cooling jacket through which glycol runs, … and will preserve a white wine’s freshness and delicacy.” (pg. 44-48). (MacNeil, 2015).
  • To sell this wine, a restaurant server would need to know about the basic characteristics of this wine, which is going to be described as light bodied white wine, with a crisp and refreshing flavor that has enough acidity to pair wonderfully with oily, lighter meats, like duck, fish and some fresh oysters. I believe, it is also equally important to mention that this wine was created by the students from CityTech who were enrolled in an advanced wine course, with the support of the Red Hook Winery and The Julia Child Foundation.

References

MacNeil, K. (2015). The Wine Bible (2nd Edition ed.). New York, New York, United States: Workman. Retrieved October 2017

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Sommelier Speak

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Entrée: Baked Fish Fillet with Tomatoes and Mushrooms

Wines from the New World wine region, which would pair well with an entrée that is selected above are the following:

  1. Red Tail Ridge Estate Dry Riesling 2014 (Riesling from New York);
  2. Smoke Tree Chardonnay 2015 (Chardonnay from Sonoma County, California);
  3. Babich Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc 2015 (Sauvignon Blanc from Marlborough, New Zealand)

Characteristics of the taste, smell and color of the Sauvignon Blanc from Marlborough, New Zealand:

According to our tasting note, the appearance of 2015 Sauvignon Blanc is clear; pale yellow color; with a brightness of day bright and low viscosity. On the nose, it is clean; medium high intensity; has a strong smell of grapefruit, melon and passion fruit; no evidence of oak; vinous; and the alcohol level is medium low. Moreover, on the palate, it is also clean; medium high intensity; has a strong taste of grapefruit, gooseberry, lime, blackcurrant and some other tropical fruits; sweetness level is dry; no evidence of tannin or wood; light bodied; and lastly, the balance is fresh and lingering. This wine can be well paired with Baked Fish Fillet with Tomatoes and Mushrooms, in addition to foods like goat cheese.

Viticulture/Vinification Practices: Sauvignon Blanc from Marlborough (South Island), New Zealand

Climate: Cool climate conditions, marked diurnal (day/night) temperature variations which are the key to the unique character of Marlborough grapes. (MacNeil, 2015).

Soil: Vineyards are primarily situated on sites with moderate to low fertility with stony, sandy loam top soil overlaying deep layers of free-draining shingle (mix of clay and silt).

Topography: Planted mostly on plains; protected by Kaikoura Range (Cold Southerly Winds); and protected by North Island (North Easterly Winds).

Grape Varieties: Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Noir, and Chardonnay.

Harvest: Can take place anytime from March to May in the Southern Hemisphere, and grapes are harvested in the cool of the morning by machine.

Pressing: Juice is gently squeezed from the grapes in the wine presses and sent to either tanks or barrels.

Fermentation: Clear juice fermented with specialized yeast in tanks give the most fruit-expressive wines, while the cloudy juice naturally fermented in oak vessels has more emphasis on texture and complexity.

Aging: Dependent on the variety the wine may age in tanks or barrels until it reaches a harmonious stage in its development.

Stabilizing & Bottling: Once the wine is ready to blend, the components are combined in tanks. After settling, the wine is chilled to below freezing to prevent crystals appearing in the wine later. It is then filtered clear to remove any sediment. Finally, the finished wine is bottled and labeled. (Spy Valley Wine, 2016).

References 

MacNeil, K. (2015). The Wine Bible (2nd Edition ed.). New York, New York, United States: Workman. Retrieved October 2017

Spy Valley Wine. (2016). From Wine To Wine . Retrieved from Spy Valley Wines: https://www.spyvalleywine.co.nz/secrets/wine-making-process-white/#jump

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