Mark’s Profile

Faculty
active 3 days, 8 hours ago
Mark
Title
Professor
Department
English
Academic interests

Urban Studies; Periodical Studies; American Studies; 19th-century American Literature

My Courses

The Place Where We Dwell: Reading and Writing About NYC

The Place Where We Dwell: Reading and Writing About NYC

The essays collected in your anthology are focused on New York City and urban issues. Reflecting on your own urban experiences alongside these essays will help you become an active participant in discussions about communities, public space, urban art forms, education, homelessness, crime, gentrification, the environment, and other topics of debate. Thinking critically about cities will also help you learn to use writing as a technology for managing competing ideas and clarifying and defending your own.

ENG1151, Journalism, D204

ENG1151, Journalism, D204

This course has two main components: first, a history of journalism and, second, experience creating a wide range of journalistic pieces. Students will gain an understanding of the issues surrounding journalism in the United States as they have developed over the past two centuries, and will apply what they have learned in their writing tasks.

ENGLISH2200, FA2018

ENGLISH2200, FA2018

In this course, we will explore the history and literature of the United States from its first settlement by Europeans until the end of the Civil War. We will discuss the political, economic, and philosophical roots of democracy, migration, and religion; contact between Native American and European populations; race, class, gender, war, nature, and expansion. Our readings, including firsthand accounts, poetry, short stories, slave narratives, political writing, sermons, and letters, will raise a variety of ethical, social, and aesthetic problems that we will examine. I welcome and encourage you to draw connections with other contemporaneous disciplines (science, art, etc), American and otherwise, as well as with current political events.

EG1121: Literature for Composition

EG1121: Literature for Composition

This is an advanced course in communication skills, including the expository essay and the research essay. This course further develops students’ reading and writing skills through literary and expository readings.

ENG2201 AmericanLiterature II, Spring 2017

ENG2201 AmericanLiterature II, Spring 2017

This course explores the history and literature of the United States starting from the end of the Civil War till the present day. Students will read a mix of genres and a number of classic tales, focusing not just on aesthetics but on the history embedded in these texts. We will cover a variety of issues relating—but not limited to—religion, class, gender, race, politics, human rights, and the history of publishing and authorship. All told, we will try to come to terms with the ethical, social, and aesthetic problems that our readings raise to both better understand our past and present.

My Projects

First Year Writing @ City Tech

First Year Writing @ City Tech

FYW@City Tech is a program and a digital forum for sharing curricular and pedagogical resources related to teaching and learning about writing at City Tech. The First Year Writing Program @ City Tech (FYW@City Tech) offers professional and curricular support for faculty teaching First Year Writing Courses (ENG1101 and ENG1121) at the college. As a repository of materials related to best practices in teaching writing, the FYW@City Tech Web site is a place where FYW instructors and faculty across the college can learn more about teaching writing and archive their unique disciplinary resources related to teaching writing at a college of technology.

English Department

English Department

Online space for faculty members of the English Department to collaborate, share resources, have conversations, and archive departmental materials. *Avatar Photo Credit: magnetic fridge poetry, Steve Johnson, July 3, 2007: https://flic.kr/p/86hhuk

Literary Arts Festival

Literary Arts Festival

Each year, the English Department at New York City College of Technology organizes the Literary Arts Festival. This event highlights the work of students, staff, and faculty, as well as accomplished writers outside of the City Tech community. There is also a writing competition that awards prizes to students in a variety of writing categories, as well as to faculty and staff in their own category.

Living Lab 2nd Year Fellows

Living Lab 2nd Year Fellows

This is a collaborative space for use by the Second Year Faculty Fellow participants in the General Education Seminar, part of City Tech’s Title V grant-funded initiative A Living Laboratory. This seminar will concentrate particularly on the second year of the student experience at our college, a critical year for our students that focuses on collaborative assignments and projects, and associate degree capstones.

The Place Where We Dwell

The Place Where We Dwell

The OpenLab Project is a companion public website to the anthology The Place Where We Dwell: Reading and Writing about New York City. Students taking their first or second composition class might approach writing and critical thinking as overwhelming, much like New York City to the newcomer. The aim of the third edition of the textbook–and this website–is to try to contextualize critical reading, writing, and thinking, while exploring this place we call home.

My Clubs

Student Government Association

Student Government Association

The Student Government Association is the representative body for students. We are responsible for recommending student activity fee allocations, shaping policies affecting student life, coordinating extracurricular events and chartering new organizations. Feel free to contact SGA President, Lucas Almonte, with any questions, suggestions or concerns. He can be reached at SGAPresident@CityTech.Cuny.Edu If you wish to start a club on campus contact SGA Vice President, Sylwester Dombroski, at SGAVP@CityTech.Cuny.Edu