Brian Ringley’s Profile

Faculty
active 4 years, 10 months ago
Brian Ringley
Title
Fabrication Lab Coordinator / Fuse Lab Technology Coordinator / Adjunct Lecturer
Department
Architectural Technology
Office Location
V824
Academic interests

social media and web-based learning, digital fabrication pedagogy, parametric software, cnc fabrication, rapid prototyping, composite materials and thin-shell structures, embedded computation, renewable energy collection, transportation infrastructure and infrastructural urbanism, Gothic vaulting and tracery, fortifications and stereotomy, seashell and feather-based biomimicry

Bio

Prior to working at City Tech, Brian was the Digital Fabrication Coordinator for the College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning and an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he also earned his MArch. Brian has worked in the architectural offices of KPF in New York and London, Dellekamp Arquitectos in Mexico City, and R&Sie(n) in Paris and has been an invited critic at Columbia GSAPP, Cornell AAP NYC, Pratt Institute, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Work Phone
718-260-5458
Twitter
Flickr
NYCCTfab, periph.fluide
Skype
brianringley

My Courses

ARCH 1210 | ARCH 1291 DESIGN FOUNDATION II | VISUAL STUDIES II

ARCH 1210 | ARCH 1291 DESIGN FOUNDATION II | VISUAL STUDIES II

Design Foundation and Visual Studies are integrally linked courses. Many of the projects feed on the knowledge derived from the paired course. This site contains course assignments, student work examples, resources, and readings.

Introduction to Computation and Fabrication

Introduction to Computation and Fabrication

This course is an introduction to digital fabrication. It will explore the qualities of materials such as wood, concrete, and plastics in the context of computational design and digital fabrication thinking and techniques. Projects will provide students with experience in the use of a variety of tools, equipment, concepts, and emerging digitally-driven technologies, including parametric rule-based design, subtractive fabrication, assembly techniques, and iterative design processes

Introduction to Industrial Robotic Automation for Architectural Manufacturing

Introduction to Industrial Robotic Automation for Architectural Manufacturing

This Perkins-funded, non-credit bearing pilot course will give students a basic introduction to the world of industrial robotic arms and automated manufacturing. An architectural assembly will be proposed, simulated, and prototyped using graphical programming in Robot Studio, the ABB RAPID code language, and the ABB IRB 140 industrial robotic arm.

My Projects

Center for Performative Design and Engineering Technology

Center for Performative Design and Engineering Technology

The School of Technology and Design at New York City College of Technology proposes to create a new Center for Performative Design and Engineering Technology that will pioneer performative design education. The project takes as its inspiration the broad focus on laboratory-based learning that brings technological education to a higher level of integration and broader faculty engagement across an entire division. The Center will become the focus of interdisciplinary project-based learning for faculty and students from its nine constituent departments where they will conduct research projects using state-of-the-art technologies in cross-cutting applications that mirror industry practice. The project will produce a laboratory design to support interdisciplinary research by configuring equipment and instrumentation for optimal collaborative use. A faculty team will create a web-based tutorial system for asynchronous learning to accompany interdisciplinary applications of cutting-edge technology. They will also design a new interdisciplinary capstone course and four cross-disciplinary projects for baccalaureate-level students. This project will provide a model for other institutions with similar programs to emulate. By bringing project-based interdisciplinary team collaborations to the fore, the project will contribute to an on-going paradigm shift in the way engineering design is taught. The project will also broaden participation since New York City College of Technology serves a high percentage of underrepresented minority students and is one of the nation’s top producers of underrepresented minority associate degree graduates in STEM fields.

Fuse Lab

Fuse Lab

Fuse Lab: Collaborative Education for Tomorrow’s Technology in Architecture, Engineering & Construction is a collaborative curriculum project funded by the National Science Foundation’s Advanced Technology Education grant program. Select the Project Site link to the right to enter the Fuse Lab Project Website.

Closing the Loop

Closing the Loop

The Closing the Loop Project explores how recent technological advances in the AEC industry have increased the potential of façade performance. In this project we are implementing an interdisciplinary student initiative, where various courses collaborate on portions of the design process of façade panels, and through this process, fully close the design/analysis/fabrication/validation loop. Data sets arising from digital models can now be shared synchronously between various disciplines as well as iteratively throughout the design process. These data exchanges are facilitated by the integration of natural programming languages into traditional modeling environments and a profusion of open source software development. The increased efficiency and corresponding cost- effectiveness of a collaborative, performance-based design process has led to a heightened call for this practice by clients and building industry legislators alike. The pedagogical challenge of a collaborative approach is not only to teach the technical skills of computational design, like scripting and parametrics, but also instill a sensibility of how to begin an adaptive, intelligent digital model that will be efficient for downstream interoperability, moving from parametric modelers to BIM families, to energy analyses, and on to direct fabrication. A new Center for Performative Design & Engineering, at NYCCT, created with National Science Foundation funding, brings together different disciplines involved in BIM (Building Information Modeling), Building Performance, and Fabrication, to teach new research methodologies and concepts through design, assembly, and testing. This project illustrates actionable responses to environmental inputs that feed into the fabrication of innovative developable and deployable surfaces.

My Clubs

Brian Ringley hasn't created or joined any clubs yet.