Films from Literature ENG 2400

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  • #68645

    Prof. Masiello
    Participant

    he first one is about POV (point of view) in films
    1) https://www.dropbox.com/sh/5ullhb1h17i2h7s/AAD9bYJ-8_DPZJr92bhODPG5a?dl=0&preview=POV+.mp4

    Questions for discussion

    A) Please list three things you may have learned in this compilation.

    B) Please list at least one question that you now have about POV.

    C) Please mention one thing you liked about this presentation.

    Slo-Mo

    2) https://www.dropbox.com/sh/5ullhb1h17i2h7s/AAD9bYJ-8_DPZJr92bhODPG5a?dl=0&preview=Slow+Mo.avi
    82 minutes 11 GB

    or the same in a different file type

    2) https://www.dropbox.com/sh/5ullhb1h17i2h7s/AAD9bYJ-8_DPZJr92bhODPG5a?dl=0&preview=Slo+Mo.f4v
    82 min 818 MB

    A) Please mention at least two things you may have learned in this compilation.

    B) Please think of a question you now have about slo-mo.

    C) Please mention one thing you liked about this video.

    D) When you have seen slo-mo BEFORE watching this, did you have any reaction: did you enjoy it, feel it is unnecessary, find any slo-mo scenes memorable, or not even noticed it?

    #68656

    afrina nishat
    Participant

    1. A. I have learned three things from this compilation which are sometime movies camera equals the point of view of main characters, sometimes POV shift to a eyeglass where it is a silent murder witness in the film, films POV is used to show physical and mental impairments.

    B. Why POV is different between filmmakers and story writer’s?

    C. “Lady in The Lake” movies unseen main character is only shown to us if the actor looks into a mirror, which is liked as a presentation.

    2. A. I have learned two things in this compilation which are slow motion is used sometimes a male characters fantasy to express about female characters beauty, slow motion shown us how an accident happened and destroyed car parts part by part and how human are injured seriously to be dead.

    B. When did slow motion starts in the film?

    C. In ” Enter The Dragon” 1973 film is shown Us slow motion is a technique to attract the audience with specific scene like fight , killed by dragon, how Dragon eat human or destroyed any city.

    #68664

    Virginia Sanchez
    Participant

    1

    A) Please list three things you may have learned in this compilation.
    In this compilation, we were introduced to a number of films using pov to incorporate different perspectives to aid the plot. One term I learned along the way was Subjective POV, where the viewer is told the character’s thoughts and feelings. An apparent fan of this was Hitchcock with the compilation using a scene from the film Birds as an example.

    It was interesting to see POV shots for non-human characters such as the shark in Jaws and the eyeglasses in Strangers on a Train. This taught me how useful it can be to understand everyone’s POV in the scene to add depth to the film.

    Originally when I heard the term POV I would think of films or games with a perspective similar to Hardcore Carry, where the viewer or character themselves is unable to see their body. However, after this compilation, I learned this technique has been used for quite some time, evolving into something more complicated than I originally thought.

    B) Please list at least one question that you now have about POV.
    As I have grown up with POV technique in it’s more evolved form when films use it I barely notice it, it feels natural. When POV began to be used in creative ways did viewers react negatively? Was it jarring?

    C) Please mention one thing you liked about this presentation.
    I really enjoyed the eyeglasses scene from Strangers on a Train in the presentation. It was very interesting to be in the perspective of the victim’s glasses.

    2

    A) Please mention at least two things you may have learned in this compilation.
    In this compilation, I learned superhero, or comic book, movies use the slo-mo technique often. Likely because characters in these films are beyond human making it hard to understand what they do in real-time.
    I also found I enjoy the extreme slow-mo effect more than the regular slo-mo. I enjoy how dramatic the extreme slow-mo effect is.

    B) Please think of a question you have about slo-mo.
    Professor do you have a favorite film that uses the slo-mo effect?

    C) Please mention one thing you liked about this video.
    I really liked the part of the compilation that showed the flash freaking out about superman seeing him. I thought it was really funny. The Doom slo-mo scene was really interesting as well with the people getting shot in the cheek. Those effects looked really good.

    D) When you have seen slo-mo BEFORE watching, did you have any reaction: did you enjoy it, feel it is unnecessary, find any slo-mo scenes memorable, or not even noticed it?
    Some movies I watched with slo-mo off the top of my head would be Hoodwinked, The Matrix, and Wanted. In all these, the technique worked well. I found it most memorable in Wanted. I really liked that movie and the added slo-mo effects made it really enjoyable to watch.

    I’d watch a lot of anime when I was younger as well and the slow-mo effect is used very often in scenes with fights. It makes the action much more powerful.

    #68674

    zeest
    Participant

    POV
    A) Please list three things you may have learned in this compilation.
    I learned about omniscient pov, how it’s all seeing like “God”. Pov adds perspective of the character, like low pov meaning from a kids eye. There’s a difference between the way writers and directors show pov, writers use words and directors use the placement of the camera. Also the fact POV can be used as aesthetics, like in “Hardcore Harry” 2016 it’s filmed in first person through a cyborg using no words like a video game.
    B) Please list at least one question that you now have about POV.
    What words can writers use to show different povs of different characters.
    C) Please mention one thing you liked about this presentation.
    I really like the scene from “The Wanderers” 1979 The POV is from boys, and I didn’t know they used associational montage by using 3 different actresses to show size difference as she was approaching the boy.
    Slo-Mo
    A) Please mention at least two things you may have learned in this compilation.
    I learned that slow motion in film is a more noticeable effect used, usually to pay attention to detail or things you wouldn’t be able to see at regular speed. Usually there will be no dialogue because of distortion. I also didn’t know it was improved through CGI.
    B) Please think of a question you now have about slo-mo.
    One question I have is why do contemporary films use longer slow motion sequences? Is it for more suspense?
    C) Please mention one thing you liked about this video.
    I liked the scene from “The shining” 1980 it keeps your attention and the camera lens appears red from the blood.
    D) When you have seen slo-mo BEFORE watching this, did you have any reaction: did you enjoy it, feel it is unnecessary, find any slo-mo scenes memorable, or not even noticed it?
    Slow motion is definitely necessary for detail purposes and to emphasize a particular scene. It’s also noticeable because of the speed difference. I’ve seen it in Die Hard 1988 where Hans is hanging off the building and suspense is building up.

    #68703

    Christopher Lobato
    Participant

    1.POV in films
    A) List three things you may have learned in this compilation.
    One thing I learned from the compilation was how POV is used to reflect or imply the mental states of characters. We can see this with Vertigo and how the man’s perspective is different when looking down the staircase implying, he has a fear of heights. In The Wanderers, because of the pov, we can assume that the POV is of the teenage male since he is so focused on the women walking by. In Trainspotting, the red carpet is in the shot while the character is high, and the carpet is visible from his POv until the point where he gets treated.

    Another thing I learned from the compilation is that a POV in a film can be unreliable, like in a novel. In a novel, the narrator will often not be aware of other character’s perspectives, and therefore be unreliable. We can see this with the film Atonement, and how the little girl’s point of view is different from the actual events that took place. A first-person POV can be visually limiting because we can only see through the camera that is mimicking the character’s point of view. This likely more prevalent is a subjective point of view.

    The last thing I learned is how POV can often change depending on the type of film. For example, first-person perspectives are common, but in horror movies, the first-person point of view is usually from the monster rather than from the main actor, which is what is more prevalent in other types of films.

    Overall, a unique POV can be a way for a film’s shots to feel less monotonous and give the audience some distinct and visually enticing perspectives. They can be an extension of the narrative or just an addition to the film’s overall visual style.

    B) List at least one question you now have about POV.
    It seems like what has been possible with POV shots has changed over time, and certain POVs have become more adopted over time. I believe the “found footage” POV seems relatively new, with the earliest example I can think of being The Blair Witch Project, which is in the compilation. Was this the earliest example, and if so, what has sparked it to become increasingly popular?

    C) Mention one thing you like about this presentation.
    I liked the inclusion of clips from the thriller and horror genres. I think this genre has a lot of opportunities to show some interesting points of view. As mentioned previously, horror movies often will include the point of view of the monster as they chase the victim. The Silence of the Lambs is an especially great choice since it’s a psychological thriller, and many of its POVs intend to create suspense or uneasiness.

    2.Slow motion
    A) Mention two things you may have learned in this compilation.
    I learned about how slow-motion effects can create drama and create anticipation. In the scene from 300, the slow-motion brings attention to the man approaching horseback and allows for the audience to anticipate Astinos’ death and make it more dramatic since, as the audience, all we can do is watch. Overall slow-motion can accentuate the ephemeralness of life. Death can be instant, but in a lot of these scenes, the act of dying is elongated to create a dramatic effect.

    Another thing I learned was the subtlety of not including dialogue or the inclusion of distorted sound for slow motion. Since this is a bit more subtle, I never paid attention to it, but it makes sense since slow-motion is mimicking how slowing downtime would feel. Slow-motion overall certainly can give an interesting dream-like feeling that could be difficult to do otherwise with other techniques.

    B) Think of one question you now have about slow-mo.
    Is there commonality with how many frames per second are needed to create a standard slow-motion effect? If the shot contains more frames like in super slow-motion, does it make it more impactful?

    C) Mention one thing you like about this presentation.
    I liked seeing some examples of slow-motion outside of action movies. It seems that the action genre has used this practice the most in recent years. It feels like the technique has been used a lot in these kinds of films to focus on the movement of characters and action sequences, so it was cool to see slow-motion as a way to focus on astounding and beautiful imagery.
    D) When you have seen slow-mo Before watching this did you have any reaction: did you enjoy it, feel it is unnecessary, find any slow-mo scenes memorable, or not even noticed it?
    As I mentioned previously, my encounters with slow motion in films have mostly been in action films. While these scenes can be visually enticing and exciting at the moment, if I think about it too much, the slow-motion can feel repetitious and dull. I think this is probably more prevalent in superhero movies and series like Fast and Furious, where the trope eventually gets worn out and becomes monotonous because, as the audience, we know what to expect. I think these movies can be fun, but if you think about it too much, it can become tiresome. A great example of slow-motion is a scene from Spiderman: Into the Spider-Verse. In this scene, the hero is leaping off of a building before the climactic fight of the movie. The slow-motion in this scene emphasizes the movement and beauty with the way the glass shards break off the window and reflect the hero’s hands and with the beautiful shot of the hero as he is falling upwards with the city in the background. It is also important to note that the film is animated, so the parts in slow-motion are animated with more frames than other parts of the film, which shows that the choice to include slow-mo is intentional. While in slow-motion, the film has no sound except the film’s soundtrack, and the speed of the scene parallels the pace of the song. The music and imagery, accompanied by the alternating speeds as he is falling, make the scene draw dropping.

    #68706

    Prof. Masiello
    Participant

    Christopher,
    You have many interesting opinions and examples showing that you paid attention to the videos.

    I do not know the frame rate differences between regular, slow, and what I called “super-slow” motion.

    You pointed out like in 300, slow-mo can help us see things better than if normal speed were used.

    As for the horror movie monster POV, very often, nowadays, when there are numerous victims as in the many “dead teenagers” horror movies, I would just say the prey is a victim, but doubtedfully the main character. In Evil Dead, it was, indeed, the main character that the evil entity was looking at.

    #68707

    Prof. Masiello
    Participant

    Zeest,
    Thanks for your responses.

    Writers are more limited, so they rely on words like “I” for first-person (think of Holden Caulfield in The Cather in the Rye) and “you,” stated or implied (reader,” “ladies and gentleman of the jury”) as per Humbert Humbert when he is talking directly to the reader. In The Great Gatsby, since the narrator is another character, Nick Carroway, he will use words like “he” and “she,” similar to the God-like use of pronouns, but Nick is not omniscient.

    It seems slow-mo can be used to intensify drama, but it has been used for comedies too, perhaps ironically.

    #68709

    Prof. Masiello
    Participant

    I think you are taking matters too literally.

    Enter the Dragon is not about a dragon. The eyeglasses in Strangers on a Train and the sunglasses in the young Humbert and Annabel scene in the novel are rare, so rather than say “sometimes” I would say “can be” used as a silent witness.

    #68710

    Prof. Masiello
    Participant

    Virginia,

    When I was researching slo-mo, I learned that even in silent film shorts (not feature films) when the cameramen had to crank the cameras at a certain rate, they sometimes slowed the speed down to indicate something dreamlike, or sped things up to make them seem funnier.

    Slow-mo was liked at the main start in the 1960s and was actually a talking point of film artistry.

    As for a favorite slow-mo scene, that is a great question. The one that I enjoyed seeing the most is the one I used from X-Men: Days of Future Past with Quicksilver. It brought a smile to my face.

    #68720

    Prof. Masiello
    Participant

    Zeest,

    If a slo-mo scene is longer than in the past, it is merely an artistic choice. Directors sometimes may exaggerate certain things to “push the envelope” by being a little different. When slo-mo was far newer in the 1960s, it tended to be in shorter lengths since audiences were just getting used to it. I think the same holds true for super slo-mo. Since audiences already know slo-mo, director Christopher raised the bar in Inception by going extremely slow.

    #68721

    Prof. Masiello
    Participant

    Here is a link to an article about “found footage” in genre films, mostly horror.

    https://www.latimes.com/entertainment/la-et-found-footage-films-photos-photogallery.html

    Unfortunately, the film titles are missing! Now that this style is a horror film “trope,” we should wait for someone in a different genre to try it, like in a comedy, just to be clever,

    #68723

    Anderson Uribe
    Participant

    POV Presentation

    A) Please list three things you may have learned in this compilation.

    1. Most films use omniscient, god-like point of view. I did not know the name, but I suspected this was the case.
    2. Sometimes the POV is very subtle and I don’t feel I am looking through any one character’s eyes. For example, in Jaws, the police chief’s POV appeared omniscient, instead. On the opposite extreme, looking through a hole is indeed obvious.
    3. Interference of edges helps to amplify the first person POV effect. For example, in Atonement, the girl’s point of view included the edge of the window. Even though it was only one side of the window, and a small piece of it, the technique was effective.

    B) Please list at least one question that you now have about POV.
    Are the reasons for choosing a character for first-person POV changed over time? After watching the film Get Out, I wondered if more films than usual will be produced showing a black person’s POV given the current social climate. The camera technique raises the emotional stakes and people are now more eager to understand a black character’s emotions.

    C) Please mention one thing you liked about this presentation.
    I simply liked the variety in the presentation. An interesting one was Silence of the Lambs, where the camera alternated between the FBI agent and the prisoner. The distance for her was much farther, than for him; clearly contrasting the emotional discomfort the director sought of the audience.

    Slo-mo Presentation
    A) Please mention at least two things you may have learned in this compilation.
    1. It can be used to heighten emotion, not only to show details of fast paced scenes. More specifically, one can linger on an emotion the director wants us to experience. The kiss in Lolita 1997 is a good example; lingering on the kiss gives a special meaning to Humbert’s reaction that follows.
    2. I was unaware of the term super slow motion. It makes sense to separate them when classifying them.

    B) Please think of a question you now have about slo-mo.
    Nowadays, slo-mo is done with computers, but how was it done in the past? Also, where did slo-mo in films come from? I’m interested in its history.

    C) Please mention one thing you liked about this video.
    I enjoy seeing some of the more creative uses for slo-mo, such as in American Beauty and Snatch.

    D) When you have seen slo-mo BEFORE watching this, did you have any reaction: did you enjoy it, feel it is unnecessary, find any slo-mo scenes memorable, or not even noticed it?
    The slo-mo shots that are most noticeable to me are those that do not use it in a context I am familiar with. When it is used to slow down action scenes, I’m not as aware of the slo-mo, or ignore it, but if it is during a scene where slo-mo is unexpected, then I notice it. I liked how it was used in Scott Pilgrim vs The World. The film sped scenes up as well, what is the name for that, I wonder.

    #68724

    Ajay
    Participant

    A) Please list three things you may have learned in this compilation.

    The three things, I have learned in this compilation was that we were introduced to a couple of films that were using POV to imply a particular shot, a scene, or an entire movie and incorporate different views from a character to who we saw and where and when to speak.

    Another thing, I learned was about POV shots and they are implied to what the camera is looking at is what the character is seeing – it is usually shot at that person’s eye height, whether they are sitting, sprawled on the ground or standing up.

    Another thing, I learned was about not all movies have a specific POV, but when you work them into your story, you often strengthen your movie’s plotline and give it better direction. And sometimes, it’s fun for the audience to figure it out.

    B) Please list at least one question that you now have about POV.

    The one question that I have now about POV is that How could you change this narrative so that it is written from a third person point of view of a film?

    C) Please mention one thing you liked about this presentation.

    The one thing that I liked about this presentation was that in the film of Forrest Gump as the audience, we get his perspective on events, but we also can use our superior smarts to figure out what’s really going on in situations that go straight over sweet, dumb Forrest’s head. That’s the narrative irony when the audience knows something, the character doesn’t.

    A) Please mention at least two things you may have learned in this compilation.

    The two things that I have learned in this compilation was about the slo-mo technique. Slow motion was key in the days of silent films, when camera operators would overcrank their cameras (to slow down footage) or undercrank them (to speed it up). These experiments could range from goofy to dreamy. Soon after the addition of sound, Hollywood embraced a standard speed for movies, and slow motion became an even more important tool.

    Another thing that I learned was about there are instances when slow motion becomes less about the moment and more about the aesthetic of a film or filmmaker. This is something that’s always fascinated me.

    B) Please think of a question you now have about slo-mo.

    The one question I have now about slo-mo is that when was slow motion first used in film?

    C) Please mention one thing you liked about this video.

    The one thing I liked about this video was that in Superman Returns someone is shotting bullets in slow motion at superman and he is not dying.

    D) When you have seen slo-mo BEFORE watching this, did you have any reaction: did you enjoy it, feel it is unnecessary, find any slo-mo scenes memorable, or not even noticed it?

    I really enjoy it because from a human perspective, slow motion videography is a technology that allows us to extend our senses beyond their natural capacities. It allows the revelation of data hidden in the folds of time, just as a microscope allows us to appreciate the wonders of a fly’s wing or a microbe’s choreography. I have not even noticed it Fast and Furious 6 back in 2013 when I saw the film because each character worth their salt had their flying, slow-motion jump moment.

    #68774

    Jennifer Apuango
    Participant

    Questions for discussion

    A) Please list three things you may have learned in this compilation.
    * In motion pictures, subjective POV sequences are typically brief since the unusual angles.
    *First-person shot is a short film scene that shows when a character is looking at a represented through the camera.The technique of POV is one of the foundations of film editing.
    *Many POV Shots are subtle and invisible. Some are subtle since the frame may include the person whose POV is being depicted.

    B) Please list at least one question that you now have about POV.
    *What are some POV differences between films and television show?

    C) Please mention one thing you liked about this presentation.
    *One thing I liked about the presentation is that POV can help the audience understand the differences between narrations and their purpose. This video gave us different examples to understand the different approaches.

    2.) Slo-Mo

    A) Please mention at least two things you may have learned in this compilation.
    *It allows suspense to build as the viewers wait for the climax of the action to happen. This buildup of suspense and encourage the viewer to pay close attention than they would if it was regular speed.
    *Through CGI, impossible images become possible enhance with reverse action and slow motion.

    B) Please think of a question you now have about slo-mo.
    *Other than action movies, what other kind of film is slow mo used the most?

    C) Please mention one thing you liked about this video.
    *One thing that I liked about this video is that whether is just a few seconds or a couple of minutes in length, once it’s viewed in slow motion it seems to make an indelible impression. It also showed different scenes of slow motion and super slow motion.

    D) When you have seen slo-mo BEFORE watching this, did you have any reaction: did you enjoy it, feel it is unnecessary, find any slo-mo scenes memorable, or not even noticed it?
    *I actually did enjoyed it, when it slows down and then speed up again it builds up excitement. A slow motion scene in which I like is “Dredd” where the entire scene was slow down to reflect their heightened emotional and mental states. It demonstrated that slow motion is a powerful way for an audience to share a characters experience of intoxication.

    #68825

    Prof. Masiello
    Participant

    Jennifer,

    Thanks for your posts.

    I think POV is decided in advance by the directors and cinematographers, rather than the editors since editors cannot change the angles as the others can.

    As far as the differences between films and TV, it used to be that films were more adventurous and creative, but with all the streaming shows, lots of TV series have a very cinematic look and will use the same techniques. For a recent example, there is a series called Ratched, which is the backstory of the evil-minded nurse in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. It is gorgeously designed and photographed, uses split-screens and POV shots, and even samples music straight out od Psycho and other films. It is a TV series that is just like a feature film in it artistry.

    The differences may as well be gone by now between film and TV. Now that people are watching even brand new films on Netflix and the films can even qualify for movie awards (as opposed to TV awards) depending on the kind of show/series there almost is no difference anymore.

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