MB Kilkelly’s Profile

Faculty
Active 2 days, 20 hours ago
MB Kilkelly
Title
Adjunct Professor
Department
Communication Design

My Courses

COMD1100-HD02 Graphic Design Principles I-Fall 2021

COMD1100-HD02 Graphic Design Principles I-Fall 2021

This basic design and color theory course explores graphic communication through the understanding of the elements and principles of design, as well as the design process, including idea development through final execution. Students develop basic skills in two-dimensional design, color and content creation while employing the design process of research, sketching and experimentation. Communication designers use the concepts explored in this course in disciplines such as advertising, graphic design, web design, illustration, broadcast design, photography, and game design.

Communications Design Theory Spring 2020 COMD3504-E232

Communications Design Theory Spring 2020 COMD3504-E232

Course Description This course will offer an in-depth introduction to communication design theory, examining theoretical perspectives of design practice within the larger discourse of design and visual culture. Communication models, the nature of representation, the dimensions of context and semiotics will be explored through critical readings from key documents written between the early decades of the twentieth century and the present. In this context, “theory” doesn’t mean “a hypothesis to be tested” (as in the sciences), but rather points to a set of working beliefs about how the world—or in this case, visual communication—works. Some aspects of certain visual communication theories are based on observable “facts,” but the way these facts are woven together says more about how we construct meaning than it does about empirical answers to factual questions. So why does a design professional—typically an eminently practical, hands-on person working toward a specific end for the benefit of a specific client—want or need to engage with visual communication theories? First, “doing theory” promotes a sophisticated level of reflection about design work—far beyond the touchstones of “did they like it?” and “did it serve its purpose?” Second, it encourages designers to think holistically about the contexts for their work—beyond the immediate job at hand to the larger contexts of the social, the cultural, and the historical. And finally, it recognizes the obvious: today, graphic design shapes our visual world and puts each person at the nexus of thousands of messages each day. In this course, we, as senders and receivers of such messages, will attempt to make sense of all this through our verbal discussions in class, our blog postings, and our research poster design and presentations. We will be looking at two types of theories: generative theories, that explain the “how” of visual communication; and critical/sociocultural theories that explain the “what, where, and when” of design, or the historical, cultural and social contexts. By developing the ability to look at design through these different lenses, professional designers can enhance the quality of their decision-making and have a better grasp on the multiple contexts and frameworks for clients and audiences. We can better understand and evaluate the many issues about local usability and usefulness within broader contexts of ethics, aesthetics, professional and social responsibility.

Communications Design Theory Fall 2019 COMD3504-E304

Communications Design Theory Fall 2019 COMD3504-E304

Course Description This course will offer an in-depth introduction to communication design theory, examining theoretical perspectives of design practice within the larger discourse of design and visual culture. Communication models, the nature of representation, the dimensions of context and semiotics will be explored through critical readings from key documents written between the early decades of the twentieth century and the present. In this context, “theory” doesn’t mean “a hypothesis to be tested” (as in the sciences), but rather points to a set of working beliefs about how the world—or in this case, visual communication—works. Some aspects of certain visual communication theories are based on observable “facts,” but the way these facts are woven together says more about how we construct meaning than it does about empirical answers to factual questions. So why does a design professional—typically an eminently practical, hands-on person working toward a specific end for the benefit of a specific client—want or need to engage with visual communication theories? First, “doing theory” promotes a sophisticated level of reflection about design work—far beyond the touchstones of “did they like it?” and “did it serve its purpose?” Second, it encourages designers to think holistically about the contexts for their work—beyond the immediate job at hand to the larger contexts of the social, the cultural, and the historical. And finally, it recognizes the obvious: today, graphic design shapes our visual world and puts each person at the nexus of thousands of messages each day. In this course, we, as senders and receivers of such messages, will attempt to make sense of all this through our verbal discussions in class, our blog postings, and our research poster design and presentations. We will be looking at two types of theories: generative theories, that explain the “how” of visual communication; and critical/sociocultural theories that explain the “what, where, and when” of design, or the historical, cultural and social contexts. By developing the ability to look at design through these different lenses, professional designers can enhance the quality of their decision-making and have a better grasp on the multiple contexts and frameworks for clients and audiences. We can better understand and evaluate the many issues about local usability and usefulness within broader contexts of ethics, aesthetics, professional and social responsibility.

Communication Design Theory Spring 2019 COMD3504-E232

Communication Design Theory Spring 2019 COMD3504-E232

Course Description This course will offer an in-depth introduction to communication design theory, examining theoretical perspectives of design practice within the larger discourse of design and visual culture. Communication models, the nature of representation, the dimensions of context and semiotics will be explored through critical readings from key documents written between the early decades of the twentieth century and the present. In this context, “theory” doesn’t mean “a hypothesis to be tested” (as in the sciences), but rather points to a set of working beliefs about how the world—or in this case, visual communication—works. Some aspects of certain visual communication theories are based on observable “facts,” but the way these facts are woven together says more about how we construct meaning than it does about empirical answers to factual questions. So why does a design professional—typically an eminently practical, hands-on person working toward a specific end for the benefit of a specific client—want or need to engage with visual communication theories? First, “doing theory” promotes a sophisticated level of reflection about design work—far beyond the touchstones of “did they like it?” and “did it serve its purpose?” Second, it encourages designers to think holistically about the contexts for their work—beyond the immediate job at hand to the larger contexts of the social, the cultural, and the historical. And finally, it recognizes the obvious: today, graphic design shapes our visual world and puts each person at the nexus of thousands of messages each day. In this course, we, as senders and receivers of such messages, will attempt to make sense of all this through our verbal discussions in class, our blog postings, and our research poster design and presentations. We will be looking at two types of theories: generative theories, that explain the “how” of visual communication; and critical/sociocultural theories that explain the “what, where, and when” of design, or the historical, cultural and social contexts. By developing the ability to look at design through these different lenses, professional designers can enhance the quality of their decision-making and have a better grasp on the multiple contexts and frameworks for clients and audiences. We can better understand and evaluate the many issues about local usability and usefulness within broader contexts of ethics, aesthetics, professional and social responsibility.

COMD4801 E284 PORTFOLIO Spring 2017

COMD4801 E284 PORTFOLIO Spring 2017

Professor MB Kilkelly Spring 2017 PORTFOLIO Monday, 6:00-9:20 pm G-203

My Projects

Office of the Provost

Office of the Provost

City Tech’s Source for Academic Affairs Information

Undergraduate Research

Undergraduate Research

Realizing the value of the research experience at the undergraduate level, this project is committed to fostering research opportunities for City Tech students. Faculty and students can use this project as a place to share announcements about research opportunities, as well as a place to offer information about the experiences students and faculty have had in their research endeavors. A handbook on effective mentoring, developed by the Undergraduate Research Committee, is currently available for download.

COMD CLT Remote Access

COMD CLT Remote Access

The COMD CLT Staff is hard at work making resources and support for the department easily accessible and available for all. This Project and associated blog will make it easier for you to find the tools and resources you need to best meet the needs of your classes. Email: comdclt@gmail.com Phone: (929) 320-0338 Skype: comdclt@gmail.com Zoom: comdclt@gmail.com

PORTFOLIO COMD 4801-D284 Fall 2016

PORTFOLIO COMD 4801-D284 Fall 2016

Company Research of the PORTFOLIO Cohort

My Clubs

Art + Design Club

Art + Design Club

We are a design club at New York City College of Technology. We host Meet the Pros (facebook.com/meetthepros) speaker series and we release an annual design magazine, Command+J.

EXP Club

EXP Club

A space to build & playtest creative tech projects. Come make video games, immersive art, virtual worlds, VR/AR experiences, 3D models, and anything else you can think of — every Thursday from 1-2pm. All skill levels + majors welcome! (We’re 100% online for Fall 2020! Hang out with us via voice chat on Discord: https://discord.gg/sQUjMN6) Every 2 weeks, we pick a new topic (apps, environment art, interactive fiction, 3D modeling…) and challenge you to make a mini project on it. Each one comes with tutorials, inspiration + download links— so you don’t need any experience to join. Find your favorite role, team up with other students for passion projects, have a support system for when you get stuck, and try something new. Check out our website for free 2D/3D assets, project ideas, scholarships, jobs, and more :)