Animatics

Animatics

Animatic

Noun. a preliminary version of a movie, live-action scene or animation, produced by shooting successive sections of a storyboard and adding a soundtrack.

Source: wiktionary

  1. Why animatics developed
    1. To show complex movement and sfx
    2. Test viability (budget and space/time constraints)
    3. Gives distance to the filmmaker – first time you can be a passive viewer/ let something “sit”
  2. uses of animatics
    1. Timing (rhythm) – things that are hard to time
    2. Special effects/ transitions
    3. Audio (choosing music/ voice)
    4. Camera movements
    5. Distance
  3. Who uses animatics?
    1. Director
    2. Actors especially working with animated characters or objects
    3. Sound booth – VO actors
  4. Types of animatics.
    1. Hand-drawn animatics (hand drawn storyboards) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8Iys-KXfFc
    2. Pencil tests (motion of characters or objects) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMLMQtFVQuU
    3. Motion preview (inspiration media that deals with motion within the frame)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLxI6kW7bFU

Videomatic

Noun. A rough videotaped version of a scene that uses actors or production staff in blocking the action, actor placement, timing and camera angles.

Source: Exploring Storyboarding, Wendy Tumminello (chapter 12)

Bluescreen/ greenscreen – an area of the picture with a designated color to “key” out. There are two types of keying : chroma and luma.

Exploring Adobe Premiere.

  1. How to import jpgs
  2. How to create pans and zooms
  3. How to make and import temporary/ rough VO

3D animatics

  1. Low cost 3D model (proxy model) instead of stand-ins allow filmmakers to experiment with camera positions.

Timing

  1. Length (rt= running time)
  2. mood/pacing
  3. rhythm/ changes in pace

Frame Rates

  1. Film vs. TV
  2. NTSC vs. PAL
  3. Calculating frames for animation
  4. Fast and slow motion

Timing for expressive results

  1. Consider the following rules:
    1. Sad shots have soft and slow motions
    2. Energized sequences have fast action/ movements and more cuts
    3. Anxious shots have fast motions but with long pauses

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