Syllabus

Course Description

A survey of the development of architectural and scenic styles in the physical structure of theatre from its beginnings in ancient Greece to its most current forms. Emphasis placed on the stylistic influences of theoreticians and artistic movements. Course co/prerequisite: ENG 1101

Interdisciplinary Option

This course is a conversation between theater history and architecture. As such, the work in class focuses on purpose-built and adapted spaces for live performance. Each week we will examine historical theatre spaces and technologies in the context of prevailing cultural and social forces in order to better understand audience/stage relationships. To fulfill the interdisciplinary requirements for this course, specialists from architecture, art history, and performance technology will guest lecture six times over the course of the semester. Students will learn a skill-set from architecture technology: GIS mapping.

Required Materials and Activities

Maintain an OpenLab account and join the class site. Readings, announcements, assignments, and study materials are disseminated through OpenLab. PDFs of published articles and lecture slides are held in password protected folder. The password is ā€œstageandtechā€. The course Blackboard site contains student grades and the Discussion Board.

Assignments and Grading

  1. Exam.Ā One exam late in the semester covering all historical material. Students will be given images of theaters and need to respond to questions about those theaters in essay form. Essays need to explain how historical technologies, ideas, and social class contributed to theater architecture and stage conventions. Students are expected to rehearse the names of architects, playwrights, and designers; names of theaters; descriptions of technologies; names of production designs; and definitions of theoretical and historical terms. (30%)
  2. Citizenship.Ā Citizenship means arriving to class on time and prepared, participating in large and small group discussions actively, attentively, and effectively, refraining from distracting or negative behavior, and consistently engaging and investing in the work of the course and in your own development as a researcher, writer, and thinker. One goal of a college education is to engage crucially in the material, which means summarizing your ideas persuasively, defending your interpretations with evidence, listening to those who disagree with you, and re-evaluating your claims based on other arguments or evidence. The citizenship grade is based on the degree to which you participate in discussions, contribute to collaborative work, ask questions, respond to verbal prompts, challenge assumptions, and carefully consider othersā€™ ideas.Ā (10%)
  3. Discussion Board: Students will respond individually to prompts on the Discussion Board (on Blackboard). Areas of discussion include the Greek Amphitheater, London Public Theaters, Noh, Harlem Renaissance, 20th century Avant-Garde, and Performative Architecture.Ā  (30%)Ā 
  4. Theater Research Project (see full instructions in Assignments)Ā see, for instance,Ā https://arcg.is/9L8vH. Scaffolded, four stages (30% total).

Grading ScaleĀ 

A 93-100 C 70-76.9
A- 90-92.9 D 60-69.9
B+ 87-89.9 F 59.9 and below
B 83-86.9 WU Unofficial Withdrawal
B- 80-82.9 WF Withdrew Failing
C+ 77-79.9

Plagiarism and Academic Integrity Statement: CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity

Students and all others who work with information, ideas, texts, images, music, inventions, and other intellectual property owe their audience and sources accuracy and honesty in using, crediting, and citing sources. As a community of intellectual and professional workers, the College recognizes its responsibility for providing instruction in information literacy and academic integrity, offering models of good practice, and responding vigilantly and appropriately to infractions of academic integrity. Accordingly, academic dishonesty is prohibited in The City University of New York and at the New York City College of Technology and is punishable by penalties, including failing grades, suspension, and expulsion. Use of cell phones, IPads, and headphones is strictly prohibited. If you are discovered using an electronic device during an exam you will automatically receive an ā€˜Fā€™ for the exam.

Humanities Department Attendance Policy

It is the conviction of the Humanities Department that a student who is not in a class for any reason is not receiving the benefit of the education being provided. Missed class time includes not just absences but also latenesses, early departures, and time outside the classroom taken by students during class meeting periods. Missed time impacts any portion of the final grade overtly allocated to participation and/or any grades awarded for activities that relate to presence in class. Students who miss a scheduled presentation, field trip, or exam due to illness or medically related emergencies will be referred to the Center for Student Accessibility. The CSA will review any documentation requested and give the student a letter to share with the relevant instructor if accommodations need to be made. The only kinds excused absence we will accept is one that comes from CSA.

Statement on Students with Disabilities

City Tech is committed to supporting the educational goals of enrolled students with disabilities in the areas of enrollment, academic advisement, tutoring, assistive technologies and testing accommodations. If you have or think you may have a disability, you may be eligible for reasonable accommodations or academic adjustments as provided under applicable federal, state and city laws. You may also request services for temporary conditions or medical issues under certain circumstances. If you have questions about your eligibility or would like to seek accommodation services or academic adjustments, please contact the Center for Student Accessibility at 300 Jay Street room L-237, 718 260 5143, orĀ http://www.citytech.cuny.edu/accessibility/.

Land Acknowledgement

We acknowledge that New York City is built on unceded land of the Lenape peopleā€“past, present, and future. We acknowledge that The New York City College of Technology is among the thousands of institutions and businesses in this city that were founded upon exclusions and erasures of indigenous people, including the Lenape who were displaced from this land. This acknowledgement demonstrates a commitment to beginning the process of working to dismantle the legacies of settler colonialism. Adapted from statement at: http://landacknowledgements.org/

Interdisciplinary Learning Outcomes / Assessment Methods

Learning Outcomes Assessment Methods
Upon successful completion of this course the student shall be able to: To evaluate the studentsā€™ achievement of the learning objectives, the professor will do the following:
1. Purposefully connect and integrate across discipline knowledge and skills to solve problems. 1. Review student reflections and the final report to evaluate integrative, multidisciplinary thinking.
2. Synthesize and transfer knowledge across disciplinary boundaries. 2. Review student reflections and the final report to evaluate integrative, multidisciplinary thinking.
3. Comprehend factors inherent in complex problems. 3. Review the studentsā€™ research methodology proposal and bibliography to evaluate critical thinking and analysis across disciplines.
4. Think critically, communicate effectively, and work collaboratively. 4. Review the students research notes and diagrams; Review the final report to evaluate critical thinking, effective communication, and effective collaboration.
5. Become flexible thinkers. 5. Review the studentsā€™ notes, sketches, and photographs to evaluate the discovery process.

Course Intended Learning Outcomes / Assessment Methods

Learning Outcomes Assessment Methods
Upon successful completion of this course the student shall be able to: To evaluate the studentsā€™ achievement of the learning objectives, the professor will do the following:
1. Use the city as a laboratory for learning. 1. Review the studentsā€™ notes, sketches, and photographs to evaluate the care of observation and the reflection of important issues discovered.
2. Develop a methodological approach to research. 2. Review the studentsā€™ research methodology proposal and bibliography to evaluate critical thinking and analysis across disciplines.
3. Understand the cultural, social and economic processes that guide the physical development of the built environment. 3. Review the students research notes and diagrams; Review the final report to evaluate integrative, multidisciplinary thinking.
4. Use analytical skills to investigate places. 4. Review the studentsā€™ notes, sketches, and photographs to evaluate the care of observation and the reflection of important issues discovered.
5. Develop, document, catalogue, and organize information to make it accessible to the public. 5. Review the studentsā€™ notes, sketches, and photographs to evaluate the care of observation and the reflection of important issues discovered; Review the final report to evaluate integrative, multidisciplinary thinking.
6. Apply observational skills to research and analysis. 6. Review the studentsā€™ notes, sketches, and photographs to evaluate the care of observation and the reflection of important issues discovered.

Image result for broadway theater