Category Archives: Chapter 3

Metacognition

Most students (and teachers) can identify with this even before reading it’s definition.  We can draw similar scenarios whenever we absolutely needed to learn anything in very short order.  We can literally assign keywords, mnemonic devices, or catch phrases to learn just about anything.

Chapter 3 – Responsibility in learning

  1. Are your students at the associates or baccalaureate level?

I have students at both levels.

2. Do you use different strategies for each level?

I generally use the same strategy for both levels, but I give the bachelor students more additional readings to spark their interest in the subject at a higher level. I do give them key terms in both classes so that they can have a ready reference to the subject matter if they can’t find it quickly in the text or notes. I do use case studies of actual situations to let them see that they must resarch an answer before they say something.

3. What is Metacognition  and what concept from the chapter resonates with you and why?

I believe that metacognition is making the students aware that  they can think for themselves and not rely on their telephones and the internet. They have to learn that the text or power points contain the basic principals of a lecture, but they must learn to take notes to supplement that information. In this manner, if they don’t understand the concept, they can come to class prepared to ask questions. I always state that they should not be afraid to ask questions they may think are “stupid” , since there may be others in the class that have the same question but are afraid to ask. They  have to think of what they are doing not rely on their friends.

4. What other factors might influence student learning?

Students must learn to communicate through the spoken word (face to face) and not rely on the internet, computer or social media. Since they don’t talk to each other it is hard for them to pose a similar or different view of a subject. I just had a situation where half the class got a homework wrong because they copied from one another and did not proof read what they copied. They even copied the misspelled words and dates, and that’s how I caught them. They tried to change the font and that didn’t work. The exercise was to recall the dates and subjects of all the information I issued during the semester (notes, tests, homework, case studies etc.) in chronological order. It was meant to teach them that they have to keep all information at the ready, in case they were called upon to prepare a report, a common occurrence in the business world.

Chapter 3 – Responsibility in Learning

  1. Are your students at the associates or baccalaureate level?

Associates Level

  1. Do you use different teaching strategies for associate level students than for baccalaureate level students? Why or why not?

If I were teaching both levels – I would probably employ the same teaching strategies. However, for the baccalaureate level students, already exposed the metacognition in the associates level, at the start of each semester, after the first meeting with the students – I would require each one to email me what in their opinion is their learning strategy and why? Then with this information I will help them to continue to excel through strategies that inspires them to be proactive learners.

  1. What is metacognition and what concept from the chapter resonates with you and why? (identify the page number)

Metacognition is the process of becoming consciously aware of oneself as a problem solver. This shift in thinking enables the individual to actively seek solutions to any problem they may encounter, rather than relying on others to tell them what to do or to answer their questions.

I was especially drawn to the concept at the top of page 26; “if we do not take the time to discover what our students already know and help them relate what they are learning to their prior knowledge, then they cannot learn in the most effective ways”.

This concept reinforces the principle that learning is effective when new information is absorbed and processed in relation what is already known and understood.

  1. What are other factors that might influence student learning?

Some factors that may influence student learning are as follows;

  1. Encouraging students to freely express what they “hear” from lectures and as instructors taking the time to listen with intention to their expressions.
  2. Help the students to engage with process and apply the information.

5. How can metacognition help us towards our goal of increasing retention 5-10% starting in the fall?

Metacognition can help us, help the students to implement learning strategies that work for them. Students will;

  1. Now be aware of the actions (monitor, plan, control) they need to take to improve their learning – they will learn to take responsibility for their learning.
  2. Identify ways to organize new information by relating that information to old ideas.
  3. Understand the material instead of just memorizing it.

 

 

Chapter 3 Response

 

1.     Are your students at the associates or baccalaureate level?

Both of them

2.     Do you use different teaching strategies for associate level students than for baccalaureate level students? Why or why not?

Usually, I don’t differentiate those levels during the teaching process, I track the student responses one to one to better understand their inclinations, strengths, and weaknesses.

3.     What is metacognition and what concept from the chapter resonates with you and why? (identify the page number)

I think metacognition is a reflective approach to frame self-awareness, with a focus on the process of understanding knowledge, seeing from a broader range to understand it as a whole

On Page 17 when a student submits something with enthusiasm and after reviewing it turn out to be not that good after all.

4.     What are other factors that might influence student learning?

I often sense when the students are overwhelmed when they are given new information, that causes a sudden stop in the learning process. I feel the need to break that pattern when I see it because the learning process will be compromised otherwise.

5.     How can metacognition help us towards our goal of increasing retention 5-10% starting in the fall?

Using the tools, and or creating a strategy to dissect the problems to identify why they have been assigned, behind this response usually transpires what they really need to learn.

what is metacognition?

1. Are your students at the associates or baccalaureate level?

Both levels.

2. Do you use different teaching strategies for associate level students than for baccalaureate level students? Why or why not?

Dissimilar nature of courses I teach demands different approaches. My associate level course is more focused on fundamentals, in contrast to the design-intensive course I teach in BTech.

3. What is metacognition and what concept from the chapter resonates with you and why?

Metacognition (MC) is thinking about thinking process, or simply, MC is self-awareness of thought process. Learners with metacognative awareness can better monitor, control, and assess their learning process, and hence become active-learners, and eventually self-learners.


The metacognative exercise on counting vowels was an interesting reminder to show: “we see only what we are looking for”, and easily can miss (or, deliberately filter out) other patterns, or information. Also, there is a line in the chapter that goes like this: “…it is absolutely not about what we say to our students, it’s about how they hear it.” It is very critical to constantly remind ourselves, and our students how open-mindedly we should see, hear, or in general perceive any sort of knowledge.

4. What are other factors that might influence student learning?

I hope forthcoming chapters will help us to get a more intimate knowledge on metacognition and how it impacts learning process in more details.

Chapter 3 Response

  1. Are your students at the associates or baccalaureate level?  Both
  2. Do you use different teaching strategies for associate level students than for baccalaureate level students? Why or why not?  I don’t differentiate between the two levels.  Many of my students are freshman and need the same level of approach.
  3. What is metacognition and what concept from the chapter resonates with you and why? (identify the page number)  Metacognition is essentially thinking about thinking.  The topic brings to the foreground the question of how engaged a student is in their own learning processes.  Active learning, as described on page 26, is a concept that is key to guiding students towards taking responsibility for the benefits they get from class, or ‘how much they will get out of it’.  Encouraging students to take a step back, assess their role in learning, and start to question how they learn best, which strategies work for them and which do not, can be an important tool in changing their narrative from passive to active.  Helping students understand how the concepts learned in class can be applied in real life can be critical in starting this process.  I find my students are engaged most when discussing real life applications and what type of job they are looking for.  I also frame the lecture as learning ‘tools’, which I find is helpful when students feel stuck.  Each class the students add to a list of tools they have learned, which is summarized in the presentation, and thus have at their fingertips a toolkit for solving problems.  When they are stuck, first I point out that I am there for questions but that I also use F1 and look up problems online, then I point them to our list of tools and ask which one might help solve the problem.
  4. What are other factors that might influence student learning?  As also described on page 26, students relate the information we relay to them back to their own personal experiences.  Hence, each student brings something unique to the learning environment.  Likewise, each student has their own challenges that they bring to the equation.  I’ve had several students that are faced with personal issues that add difficulty to their performance in class in the form of distraction or being absent.  These issues are obviously paramount for the student compared to learning how to draw or read plans, which is what I am trying to teach them in class.  It is important to be empathetic towards these issues, while helping the student find a path forward where they can take care of their personal needs while meeting their goals academically/professionally.
  5. How can metacognition help us towards our goal of increasing retention 5-10% starting in the fall?  I found the reading very exciting because I’ve seen in my classroom, especially with freshman, that personal habits and approaches to learning have a significant impact on the student’s performance.  Introducing students to metacognition and these basic strategies could have a tremendous impact in helping students develop the personal tools they need to be successful, especially those that are struggling.

Chapter 3 Response

1.     Are your students at the associates or baccalaureate level?

My two courses are freshmen and sophomore level classes and apply to both degrees.

2.     Do you use different teaching strategies for associate level students than for baccalaureate level students? Why or why not?

I use the same teaching strategies for both degree levels because 1) I don’t know the pathway that the students are in 2) many of the students are unsure of the level they want to pursue

3.     What is metacognition and what concept from the chapter resonates with you and why?

Metacognition is “the ability to think about one’s own thinking, be consciously aware of oneself as a problem solver, monitor, plan, and control one’s mental processing, and accurately judge one’s level of learning” (p. 17).  For students to be aware of themselves as a problem solver, monitor, and planner is an imperative skill.  Being self-aware of their learning, learning style allows them to become self-advocates.  They can understand what tools they may need in order to become more successful students and can ask for help, permitting more personal control, responsibility and confidence in their learning process.

4.     What are other factors that might influence student learning?

Other factors that influence student learning can be their socio-economic status, family obligations, race and culture, gender, and previous exposure to the subject matter.

5.     How can metacognition help us towards our goal of increasing retention 5-10% starting in the fall?

It’s important that students become aware of what type of learning and teaching best suits them.  We can provide our students with additional resources to best cater to those learning styles.  Also, students who understand that we want them to succeed will also feel more supported in our classrooms.

Ch.3 Responses

Do you use different teaching strategies for associate level students than for baccalaureate level students? Why or why not? The students that take surveying I are typically in their first or second year working towards either an associates or a bachelors degree. Because surveying I is an introductory course most of the students will not have had any prior experience so the playing field is level.

What is metacognition and what concept from the chapter resonates with you and why? Metacognition is being aware of the difference between active learning and passive studying and knowing how to get students to become active learners. (p.26)

What are other factors that might influence student learning?
Access to resources such as the internet from home so that students may check blackboard for assignments and other lecture materials.

How can metacognition help us towards our goal of increasing retention 5-10% starting in the fall?
By using teaching strategies that require active participation in the classroom rather than just lecturing, such as asking the students to paraphrase what you have said. This provides feedback to the teacher and the students that allows them to assess their own strategies.

Chapter 3 Response

  1.    Are your students at the associates or baccalaureate level?

Associates Level

  1.    Do you use different teaching strategies for associate level students than for baccalaureate level students? Why or why not?

If I was teaching on two levels, I think I would teach the BTech level differently since the students would have more exposure to draw on for discussion. I think I would try to push their thinking more with assignments, trying to explore their creativity in approaching solutions.

  1.    What is metacognition and what concept from the chapter resonates with you and why? (identify the page number)

Metacognition is “thinking about thinking”. What resonated with me was the discussion on page 26, how ‘it is not what we say to our students, but it’s about what they hear’. I do find myself sharing examples of how I see things and what helps me understand, but I see the importance of asking them more about their connections to the material to better gauge their understanding and see what is “the most efficient path for them”.

  1.    What are other factors that might influence student learning?

Other factors that may influence student learning is their desire/motivation to learn the material. If a student feels that a course/topic is not relevant to their career path, they may view it as a class that they just need to pass and never use again. In teaching fluids, I try to draw some motivation by highlighting how fluids ties into the five major civil topics (for the PE). For example, we discuss how a structural engineer may be concerned with water inside a tank being designed or a construction manager may be concerned with water on site after a storm.

  1.    How can metacognition help us towards our goal of increasing retention 5-10% starting in the fall?

Metacognition can help retention by boosting confidence of students. An example in the book noted how a student may withdraw and stop attending classes if they do not feel they do not understand the material (and maybe feel helpless to change). Also, having students realize they can achieve a higher level of understanding may inspire them to reach for higher goals (perhaps going on to obtain a BTech instead of stopping at the Associates degree).

Chapter 3

 

  1. Are your students at the associates or baccalaureate level?

My students are at the BTech level.

  1. Do you use different teaching strategies for associate level students than for baccalaureate level students? Why or why not?

I only teach at the BTech.

  1. What is metacognition and what concept from the chapter resonates with you and why? (identify the page number)

Metacognition is being aware and understanding one’s thought process. I enjoyed the author bringing up metacognition and how it is a key ingredient in students’ success. In page 16-17 it introduced what metacognition is and how it is beneficial for students. I like this because it is important that students are aware of what they are learning and thinking since most of the time it is really easy for them to get distracted and not follow the material that they are taught.

  1. What are other factors that might influence student learning?

I feel that self motivation is a key factor that influences student learning as well. This is all due to the fact that without motivation and the will to do well in a course, a student will not successfully grasp the material taught and do well in not only the class itself, but real world problems that apply later in the future. Students need to come into class with a clear mind and motivation set with them to want to understand what they are being taught.

  1. How can metacognition help us towards our goal of increasing retention 5-10% starting in the fall?

I feel that metacognition can help our students be more focused on their courses and what are asked of them. This could help them be less distracted when they are doing homework, completing a project, and most importantly taking a test.