HW for Mon 3/18

HW: Work with your Essay 2 group to choose a word or phrase to focus your research on.  (You can change your mind later if you’re not pleased with your research results.)  Working individually: search for, find, and print a text dealing with your word/phrase that you want to read.  Bring this in next class.  In Packet 2, read “Intro to Summary Writing” and “MLA Citation Quick Guide.”  Reminder: a revised Essay 1 is due at the Midterm exam next Wed.
Prompt for Mon: In the text you’ve found for Essay 2, find five sentences that show interesting or important points the author is making.  Write out these sentences exactly as the author has written them.  At the beginning of each quote, introduce it using the title, the author’s name, and a signal verb.  At the end of each quotation, include an MLA-formatted in-text citation.  An example for you to follow is below: the introduction and MLA citation are color-coded.
EX:
In “The Viral Virus,” Lauren Duca points out that “Identity-bait listicles invite readers to indulge a kind of cyberchondria for attention, a like-driven version of Munchausen syndrome” (Duca 95).

9 thoughts on “HW for Mon 3/18”

  1. 1.) In “Self and Identity,” Ed. Malcolm L. Johnson. Cambridge Points out “Studies on self and identity are carried out in developmental, personality and social psychology, but also in educational and occupational psychology” (Malcolm, Johnson 275).  Dittmann-Kohli, Freya. “Self and Identity.” The Cambridge Handbook of Age and Ageing, edited by Malcolm L. Johnson, Cambridge University Press, 2005, pp. 275-291. Gale Virtual Reference Library, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX1311200038/GVRL?u=cuny_nytc&sid=GVRL&xid=139f945b. Accessed 17 Mar. 2019.

    2.) In “Self and Identity,” Ed Malcolm, L. Johnson points out “Identity construction is a life-long developmental task comparable to the (sociological) constructivist task of adapting one’s concept of the life-course to the changing social environment, and of continuing to adapt one’s life story to the growing number of events and experiences in the course of life” (Malcolm, Johnson 276). Dittmann-Kohli, Freya. “Self and Identity.” The Cambridge Handbook of Age and Ageing, edited by Malcolm L. Johnson, Cambridge University Press, 2005, pp. 275-291. Gale Virtual Reference Library, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX1311200038/GVRL?u=cuny_nytc&sid=GVRL&xid=139f945b. Accessed 17 Mar. 2019.

    3.) In “Self and Identity,” Ed Malcolm, L. Johnson points out “Adult identity development and the individual lifespan construct have been proposed by Whitbourne as important scientific constructs for long-term changes in personality and self” (Malcolm, Johnson 276). Dittmann-Kohli, Freya. “Self and Identity.” The Cambridge Handbook of Age and Ageing, edited by Malcolm L. Johnson, Cambridge University Press, 2005, pp. 275-291. Gale Virtual Reference Library, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX1311200038/GVRL?u=cuny_nytc&sid=GVRL&xid=139f945b. Accessed 17 Mar. 2019.

    4.) In Self and Identity,” Ed Malcolm, L. Johnson points out “These three terms are often overlapping. In many cases, the terms “ identity ,” “self” and “self-concept” are used interchangeably, in other cases not. For instance, the social psychologists Sedikides and Brewer (2001) refer to individual self, interpersonal self and collective self, where the latter covers group identity” (Malcolm, Johnson 277). Dittmann-Kohli, Freya. “Self and Identity.” The Cambridge Handbook of Age and Ageing, edited by Malcolm L. Johnson, Cambridge University Press, 2005, pp. 275-291. Gale Virtual Reference Library, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX1311200038/GVRL?u=cuny_nytc&sid=GVRL&xid=139f945b. Accessed 17 Mar. 2019.

    5.) In Self and Identity,” Ed Malcolm, L. Johnson points out “In the present context, “ identity ” and “self-concept” (or self- and life concept) will be used as terms for a broad view of self-understanding and self-interpretation, leading to more or less structured self-knowledge in the sense of a subjective theory that can function as a cognitive map (with goal markers) to orientate and motivate behavior (Malcolm,Johnson 279). Dittmann-Kohli, Freya. “Self and Identity.” The Cambridge Handbook of Age and Ageing, edited by Malcolm L. Johnson, Cambridge University Press, 2005, pp. 275-291. Gale Virtual Reference Library, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX1311200038/GVRL?u=cuny_nytc&sid=GVRL&xid=139f945b. Accessed 17 Mar. 2019.

    1. Thanks for these, Andy—they’re great quotes.  A couple quick suggestions:

      –I believe the author here is Freya Dittmann-Kohl (the editor of the encyclopedia is Malcolm Johnson).  So use her name when introducing the quotations and in the parenthetical in-text citations—e.g., (Dittman-Kohli 279).

      –You’d want to use the word “that” before your quotations as it is part of the signal phrase “X points out that.”

      –You may want to vary your use of signal phrases using some of the options found here:

      https://department.monm.edu/english/mew/signal_phrases.htm

      Best, Monroe

  2. 1. In “The College Identity Crisis: Who Am I? ” Maverick Kohlhof points out that “The best way to shape our identities is by living and learning. Not one college course can tell us who we are, but it can shape what we believe or possibly change a custom of ours, but all of these are just minor parts to the whole. (Kohlhof 1)

    2. In “The College Identity Crisis: Who Am I? ” Maverick Kohlhof points out that “People and places have the strongest influence in shaping our identities, which completely changes when we get into college.” (Kohlhof 1)

    3. In “The College Identity Crisis: Who Am I? ” Maverick Kohlhof points out that “The only problem is that most college students go through identity crises because we have not fully answered the question of “who am I?”(Kohlhof 1)

    4.  In “The College Identity Crisis: Who Am I? ” Maverick Kohlhof points out that “No matter where we are, there will always be an identity struggle, but college is the time where it happens most.” (Kohlhof 1)

    5.   In “The College Identity Crisis: Who Am I? ” Maverick Kohlhof points out that  “Sometimes the identity we create for ourselves is not always the one we expect or want. Perhaps we are not always who we want to be, but maybe it is who we need to be.” (Kohlhof 1)

    1. Great quotes, Shanice.  Some quick ideas for improvement:
      –You will want to format the endings of your quotes differently.  Place the closing quotation marks before your parenthetical citation and then place the period after the citation.  For example:
      In “The College Identity Crisis: Who Am I? ” Maverick Kohlhof points out that  “Sometimes the identity we create for ourselves is not always the one we expect or want. Perhaps we are not always who we want to be, but maybe it is who we need to be” (Kohlhof 1).

      –Are all of these quotes from p. 1?  It’s fine if there aren’t page #s; if there aren’t, you can just put the author’s name in the parentheses.
      –You may want to vary your use of signal phrases using some of the options found here:
      https://department.monm.edu/english/mew/signal_phrases.htm
      Best, Monroe

  3. 1) In “From Clickbait to Fake News Detection: An Approach based on Detecting the Stance of Headlines to Articles” Peter Bourgonje, Julian Moreno Schneider, Georg Rehm explains “Traditional barriers to publishing content (like a press to print newspapers or broadcasting time for radio or television) have disappeared”           (Peter Bourgonje, Julian Moreno Schneider, Georg Rehm, 84).

    2) In “From Clickbait to Fake News Detection: An Approach based on Detecting the Stance of Headlines to Articles”Peter Bourgonje, Julian Moreno Schneider, Georg Rehm describes “The acknowledgment that teenagers increasingly rely on news coming from non-traditional news sources underlines the need for new ways of dealing with challenges related to these alternative sources”(Peter Bourgonje, Julian Moreno Schneider, Georg Rehm, 86).

    3) Within the article “From Clickbait to Fake News Detection: An Approach based on Detecting the Stance of Headlines to Articles”Peter Bourgonje, Julian Moreno Schneider, Georg Rehm express in words “One concrete example with the headline “Small Meteorite Hits Managua” in its article body mentions “the Nicaraguan capital” but not “Managua” and “a chunk of an Earth-passing asteroid” instead of ‘small meteorite’ “(Peter Bourgonje, Julian Moreno Schneider, Georg Rehm, 87).

    4)Inside  “From Clickbait to Fake News Detection: An Approach based on Detecting the Stance of Headlines to Articles”Peter Bourgonje, Julian Moreno Schneider, Georg Rehm states” The authors claim that “authenticity” is highly valued among teenagers consuming news, hence their explained preference for blogs, satirical shows, or basically anything other than traditional media outlets, which they consider “identical”, lacking contextual information and any authenticity.”(Peter Bourgonje, Julian Moreno Schneider, Georg Rehm, 85,86).

    5)According to  “From Clickbait to Fake News Detection: An Approach based on Detecting the Stance of Headlines to Articles”Peter Bourgonje, Julian Moreno Schneider, Georg Rehm gives feedback on an experiment by stating   “Although they have a slightly different definition of “fake news” than the one we use in this paper, the study presents a relevant overview of the consumption of news and the important aspects with different social groups.” (Peter Bourgonje, Julian Moreno Schneider, Georg Rehm, 85).

  4. Nice quotations, Justin.  Below are some suggestions:

    –You will want to format the endings of your quotes somewhat differently.  Place the closing quotation marks before your parenthetical citation and then place the period after the citation.  For example:
    In “The College Identity Crisis: Who Am I? ” Maverick Kohlhof points out that  “Sometimes the identity we create for ourselves is not always the one we expect or want. Perhaps we are not always who we want to be, but maybe it is who we need to be” (Kohlhof 1).
    –For your citations, you can use the first author’s last name followed by the phrase et al. (meaning “and others”).  Otherwise, your citations will be too long with 3 or more names.  You can use the same abbreviation when introducing your quotes too.
    EX: In “From Clickbait to Fake News Detection: An Approach based on Detecting the Stance of Headlines to Articles,” Peter Bourgonje et al. give feedback on an experiment by stating that “Although they have a slightly different definition of  ‘fake news’ than the one we use in this paper, the study presents a relevant overview of the consumption of news and the important aspects with different social groups” (Bourgonje et al. 85).
    –You will want to use the word “that” before your quotations as it is part of many of the signal phrases you are using: e.g., “X explains that ‘...’”  For the verb describes, you will want to add the word how because it is part of the signal phrase “X describes how ‘…'”
    –Other signal phrases to consider can be found here:
    https://department.monm.edu/english/mew/signal_phrases.htm
    Best, Monroe

  5. 1)         1) “WHO IS A “CRIMINAL”? “Sloppy Assumption: the noun “criminal” can be predicated truly of any person who knowingly violates a law.” (Leeuwen 8)
    2)”WHO IS A “CRIMINAL”? “It’s easy to see why this assumption is wrong. If it were true, then anyone who drives over the speed limit is a criminal.”(Leeuwen 9)

    3)”WHO IS A “CRIMINAL” “the noun “criminal” can be predicated truly of any person who knowingly violates a law, where that law satisfies the condition.”(Leeuwen 21)

    4)”WHO IS A “CRIMINAL” Alternately, anyone who doesn’t pay taxes on the $25 they get for cat sitting the neighbor’s cat would be a criminal. (Leeuwen 11)

    5)”WHO IS A “CRIMINAL” “the difference between laws that one can violate without becoming a “criminal” (like speeding) and laws that one becomes a “criminal” in violating (like robbing a bank).”(Leeuwen 22)

  6. 1. In the article “11 Reasons We’re Too Dumb to Resist Clickbait, David Tomar explains clickbait, ” Clickbait may refer to a link whose resulting article doesn’t actually deliver on its promise, or to one that delivers on its promise, but poorly, or to one whose promise inherently has no merit.” (Tomar)

    2.  In the article “11 Reasons We’re Too Dumb to Resist Clickbait, David Tomar introduces his idea by stating, “This article isn’t what the headline suggests. It’s actually about how you clicked on the headline, how you followed the link, how you took the bait.” (Tomar)

    3. In the arcticle “11 Reasons We’re Too Dumb to Resist Clickbait”, David Tomar states, “clickbait peddles in innately dishonest language, adorning otherwise straightforward headlines with exaggeration, hyperbole or fabricated specificity.” (Tomar)

    4.   In the arcticle “11 Reasons We’re Too Dumb to Resist Clickbait”, David Tomar states, “So for the person writing a clickbait-y headline, the key is to manipulate in a way that appeals to the reader’s emotions and curiosity (as opposed to the reader’s intellect).” (Tomar)

    5. In the arcticle “11 Reasons We’re Too Dumb to Resist Clickbait”, David Tomar states, “On its face, clickbaiting is pretty obvious. It’s manipulative but you know you’re being manipulated. So for the person writing a clickbait-y headline, the key is to manipulate in a way that appeals to the reader’s emotions and curiosity (as opposed to the reader’s intellect).”

  7. 1  1)  In the article “We Shouldn’t Have to Trend to Make You Listen”: Queer Fan Hashtag Campaigns as Production Interventions”,  by Annemarie Navar-Gill and Mel Stanfill said that “If media is often approached through one or more of the lenses of production, text, and audience, then queerness can be present at any of these points” (Navar-Grill and Stanfill 85).
         2) According to the article “We Shouldn’t Have to Trend to Make You Listen”: Queer Fan Hashtag Campaigns as Production Interventions”, by Annemarie Navar-Gill and Mel Stanfill stated that 8, what we are calling queer fan hashtag campaigns are new. They are, in fact, new for each of their constituent parts—new because the cultural position of LGBTQ+ people has changed, new because fandom social norms have changed, new because technology has changed, and new because industry itself has changed” (Navar-Grill and Stanfill 85).
    3) As illustrated in the article “We Shouldn’t Have to Trend to Make You Listen”: Queer Fan Hashtag Campaigns as Production Interventions”,  by Annemarie Navar-Gill and Mel Stanfill indicated that those in the queer community “They are also an important enough audience to “queerbait,” a term that refers to “situations where those officially associated with a media text court viewers interested in LGBT narratives—or become aware of such viewers—and encourage their interest in the media text without the text ever definitively confirming the nonheterosexuality of the relevant characters” (Ng, sec. 1.2). This is ultimately indicative that, as Alexandra Chasin has argued, LGBTQ+ folks are a valued market”. (Navar-Grill and Stanfill 86)
    4)  In “We Shouldn’t Have to Trend to Make You Listen”: Queer Fan Hashtag Campaigns as Production Interventions”, by Annemarie Navar-Gill and Mel Stanfill pointed out that “The last piece of the puzzle is fans themselves and their social norms, and they too are different than they used to be. Historically, there was much stigma around being a fan(Ballinger; Jenkins, “Introduction”; Lewis; Penley)”. (Navar-Grill and Stanfill 87)
    5)  When reading the article “We Shouldn’t Have to Trend to Make You Listen”: Queer Fan Hashtag Campaigns as Production Interventions”,  by Annemarie Navar-Gill and Mel Stanfill indicated “Fan reactions on social media are often negatively characterized as demonstrating “Fan entitlement.” In this model, hashtags such as #LexaDeservedBetter are understood as not much more than belligerent tantrums from people “uninterested in conflict or personal difficulty in their narratives,” preferring that the character they care about “be happy and get whatever [s/]he wants—ie, the exact opposite of what you want from good drama” (Faraci)”. (Navar-Grill and Stanfill 89)

     
     
     

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