Komron – Cover Letter

Network Engineer job position at Bloomberg

http://jobs.bloomberg.com/job/New-York-Network-Engineer-Job-NY/246898400/?feedId=93400&utm_source=Indeed&utm_campaign=Bloomberg_RD_US&sponsored=ppc&utm_campaign=RDUS

Dear Hiring Manager:

I came across a Network Engineer position on CareerBuilder and I think you will find me right fit for this position. I have 4 years of experience working with small and enterprise size networks. I proudly can say I build Networks from day one, starting with gateways to Multi-Vlan trunking switches and clients.

I can contribute to clients who wants to start network from building the first server rack to clients who has vast networks of switches and servers. My knowledge is not limited by networking, I am also familiar with Linux,  Windows Servers, Points Of Sale, security and surveillance systems and electronics. PBX systems of different vendors such as Cisco and Avaya. I hope you find my skills and experience a fit  for this position.

Please Find my attached resume. You can contact me any time by my email or cell phone

Sincerely

Komron Zokhidov

 

2 thoughts on “Komron – Cover Letter

  1. Maisha Price

    •Reverse Engineer the Letter: Without looking at the job ad/listing, read the letter. Then write down what you think the job ad says—you are reverse engineering the letter/ad by doing this—trying to see if you can figure out the job ad just from the letter.
     The job is for an opening/position for a Network Engineer with someone who has at least 2-3 years of experience.
    •Read the job ad. Were you close in your reverse engineering attempt? If you were, then the letter probably meets with some of the employer’s needs. If you weren’t, has the author missed understanding the employer’s needs? Or have they just emphasized certain things and overlooked others?
     I believe the letter does specify a general description relative to the job’s responsibilities.
    •Does the letter make the person applying seem like a good applicant; an unappealing applicant; or an outstanding applicant?
     The applicant matches what the employer is looking for, however, there are grammatical errors that would take away from the individual’s qualifications.
     The applicant is a good applicant.
    •Explain why and how you made the judgment in #3. If the applicant was not an outstanding candidate, explain what you think the author needs to do to get into a higher pile.
     The author needs to proofread and scan for grammatical errors and possibly at least an extra line or two to each paragraph describing skills and qualifications.
    •Is the letter free of spelling, mechanical, and grammar errors? Let the author know about the errors you see.
     Enter a capital “I” for every lower case “I” in the letter and eliminate the space between “Linux “and “Windows”.

    Reply
  2. Kenny

    1. Reverse Engineer the Letter: Without looking at the job ad/listing, read the letter. Then write down what you think the job ad says—you are reverse engineering the letter/ad by doing this—trying to see if you can figure out the job ad just from the letter.

    I believe the job ad is about computer networking. An engineer base field for computing servers in Bloomberg.

    2. Read the job ad. Were you close in your reverse engineering attempt? If you were, then the letter probably meets with some of the employer’s needs. If you weren’t, has the author missed understanding the employer’s needs? Or have they just emphasized certain things and overlooked others?

    Yeah, I was close to in my reverse engineering attempt. The company’s name is Bloomberg. They have an exciting opportunity for a Network Engineer with both operational and design experience to be a part of the Network Operations Engineering team. You will work with Bloomberg’s R&D, Operations and Product teams, as well as our telecom and hardware vendors to leverage Bloomberg’s international private MPLS network for business and client needs.

    3. Does the letter make the person applying seem like a good applicant; an unappealing applicant; or an outstanding applicant?

    The letter make the person applying look like a very good applicant.

    4. Explain why and how you made the judgment in #3. If the applicant was not an outstanding candidate, explain what you think the author needs to do to get into a higher pile.

    The letter makes the applicant look very good because he explains about his skills, as well other talents that might benefit to the company as a networking engineer.

    5. Is the letter free of spelling, mechanical, and grammar errors? Let the author know about the errors you see.

    After the writer’s proof read from peer review one, the letter is free of spelling, mechancal, and grammar errors.

    Reply

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