Fernweh

fernweh (noun)

Pronounciation: foun-vih

  1. A longing for far off or unseen places
  2. The German translation for “wanderlust”

I actually found this word from an article I was reading about different travel words, it is linked down below. It is an actual word, not made up. The antonym for this word would be homesickness.

Sources: The Local, SoloSophie, Minafi

Project #5 Final Draft

“You never know what you have until it’s gone”. This quote represents exactly how I feel about this semester coming to an end. It went by much faster than I had expected, and I am quite sad to know that I most likely won’t have the same professors for any one of my future classes. It’s not like high school where you most likely have classes with the same people and teachers every year. It almost feels like a shorter school year, and a transition to a different school because of how different each semester is going to be.

This semester I have learned so much about writing, college life, and even myself as a person. I don’t even know where to begin. Doing the projects for this class made me fall in love with writing even more because when you write about yourself it doesn’t just reflect who you are as a writer, but also as a person. Seeing my posts on the blog have helped me see myself from a different point of view, my “glows and grows”; my strengths and weaknesses. As much as I love to write, I never really had the chance to see myself from another perspective until Project #2.

I was used to doing much more formal essays, writing five or more paragraphs making a claim and using evidence to support it, but this particular project had a different format. When we had the ability to choose the questions and do the interviews, it threw me off at first as I had never written anything like it before, let alone an interview on myself. Knowing myself, I wanted to make it perfect. I was always a perfectionist, making sure even the smallest of mistakes were fixed. To be honest, the perfectionism caused me to grow a bit of an ego. I thought that whatever I did, it was the best and no one could say anything about it. If there was a fault in my work, I would get quite frustrated. One day though, my mother noticed my frustration and said, “You will burn yourself out trying to be perfect. You need to relax, give it your best, but don’t try to be perfect because it won’t work out. Besides, perfection is boring”. Perfection is boring. It reminded me of my favorite show, Sense8, a show that embraces originality and all things imperfect. One of the directors Lana Wachowski had said the same thing to one of the actors who was also a perfectionist: “Perfection is boring”. It allowed me to see things a bit differently, and relax. Live a little.

I began reading my classmates’ interviews and posts, and thought about about what my mother and Wachowski had said. I was inspired, which has ever happened before. I realized that we were all the same deep down, somehow connected. We all want to do something within the art and design industry, whether it is UX/UI or being a freelance designer. Everyone was putting themselves out there, stepping out of their comfort zone, and I did the same with my posts. I am in no means a social person, but as I have stated before, I express myself through my work, whether it is through design or writing. It all helped me realize that everyone at some point during their lives do something because they got inspired by someone else. From the words of Pablo Picasso, “Good artists copy. Great artists steal”. Not everyone picks that up as a college student, but they will at some point.

Another project that allowed me to see my strengths and weaknesses was Project #3, the juxtaposition project. This was a very tricky project for me, as this was even more out of my element. I’ve seen many juxtapositions in the city throughout the years, but never really paid much attention to it. I’ve known about rezoning and gentrification becoming a bit of an issue here, but it is a style of writing that I haven’t done before nor was I particularly used to. I still gave it a try because I want to try as many styles of writing as I can, as I know that in the near future I will be writing much more. I think the most difficult part for me was talking about the building I did in particular, the Dime Savings Bank. I didn’t really know much about the building, but I know it’s been under construction for quite some time now. I wasn’t familiar with the bank itself, and being as descriptive as possible with everything was something I normally do not do. It’s something I can definitely improve on, and the project in general has now made me much more aware of my surroundings. The skills needed to write this kind of project beautifully are necessary for working in many different fields, so I hope to improve on that so it can help me in the long run. Now whenever I walk around I point at every juxtaposition I can find, it’s almost like a game to me: who can find the most juxtapositions?

Project #5 First Draft

“You never know what you have until it’s gone”. This quote represents exactly how I feel about this semester coming to an end. It went by much faster than I had expected, and I am quite sad to know that I most likely won’t have the same professors for any one of my future classes.

This semester I have learned so much about writing, college life, and even myself as a person. Doing the projects for this class made me love writing even more because when you write about yourself it doesn’t just reflect who you are as a writer, but also as a person. Seeing my essays and posts have helped me see myself from a different point of view, my “glows and grows”, which is another term for my strengths and weaknesses. As much as I love to write, I never really had the chance to see myself from another perspective until Project #2. When we had the ability to choose the questions and do the interviews, it was something rather strange to me at first as I had never done an assignment as such before. However, when I began reading my classmates’ interviews, I got inspired, which actually never happened before. I’m so used to doing my own thing and being a perfectionist, but writing has helped me change that.

As a college student, writing helped me realize that it’s okay to gain inspiration from others, even if they’re your peers. Everyone at some point during their lives do something because they got inspired by someone else. From the words of Pablo Picasso, “Good artists copy. Great artists steal”.

Designer Statement Part 4

Cristal Castro is a European-American communication design student at the New York City College of Technology, pursuing a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. She hopes to refine her skills in all types of design to expand her knowledge in the field and become successful.

For this project, I decided to do a designer statement. A designer statement is similar to an Artist’s Statement, which is a brief description of the creative process and the work produced. A designer statement allows the reader to gain insight on the designer’s inspirations and style, along with their creative perspective. They are often written as a short (50-100 word) and/or a long (500-1000 word) version of the same statement, and they may maintain and revise these statements throughout their careers. They would be edited to suit the requirements of specific funding bodies or galleries as part of the application process.

When you are writing a designer statement, you don’t just want to discuss the process of creating your artwork; you want to think about your thought process, what your work and inspirations say about you as a designer. Some questions that you should have while writing this kind of statement would be: “What does your work express? Why are you doing this? What inspired you to make this?” Creating a mind map before putting your designer statement together is a great way to jot down all of your ideas.

I chose this type of statement because it allows me to express myself in a way that others can understand me. I like to look at it as the grand tour of your mind, you show the steps you took to create the product, how your creative perspective reflects on your work, etc. I believe that as a designer it is important for your audience to see from your perspective and understand why you do what you do/how you create something. because once they see it, that’s when their entire perspective of your work changes. For example, if I were to create an orange blob, your first thought may be, “Okay, this is just an orange blob. What is the point of making a blob?” However, if I were to write about how it represents my love for making slime and that the first one I ever made was the color orange, you may see it differently. You see how much impact a designer statement can have on your work? It’s amazing.

Sources

“Artist/Designer Statement.” PacificGraphicDesign, 16 Nov. 2015, https://pacificgraphicdesign.wordpress.com/becoming-an-art-student/job/artistdesigner-statement/.

“Artist & Design Philosophy Statements.” Artist and Design Philosophy Statements | Fashion Institute of Technology, http://www.fitnyc.edu/writing-studio/guides/art-design-statements.php.

“What Is a Design Statement?Print.” Auckland Design Manual, http://www.aucklanddesignmanual.co.nz/resources/design-statements/DesGuideDS/guidance/designstatement/definition.