All posts by seoyeonieee4

Glen

Ricketts_Glen_State_Park_Erie_Falls_5Glen (n) – a narrow valley

definition from Merriam Webster (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/glen)

From Beloved by Toni Morrison (page 95)

“When the busy day is done

And my weary little one

Rocketh gently to and fro;

When the night winds softly blow,

And the crickets in the glen

Chirp and chirp and chirp again; …”

Amy was singing her mother’s song. The lyrics describe a night when winds softly blow and the crickets in the small valley chirp.

 

Salsify

Salsify (n) : a European biennial composite herb (Tragopogon porrifolius) with a long fusiform edible root —called also oyster plant, vegetable oyster

definition from Merriam Webster

(http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/salsify)

salsify

 

From Beloved by Toni Morrison (page 27, 3rd line)

She who had never had one but this one; she who left a dirt floor to come to this one; she who had to bring a fistful of salsify into Mrs. Garner’s kitchen every day just to be able to work in it, feel like some part of it was hers, because she wanted to love the work she did, to take the ugly out of it, and the only way she could feel at home on Sweet Home was if she picked some pretty growing thing and took it with her.

Paul D thought the 124 house is not important or a big deal, but the house is the only thing that she owned. When she was at Sweet Home, she had to take salsify flowers into Mrs. Garner’s kitchen just to make it feel like her house.

Beloved looking at the murder

20150510_023747

This is a scene of a woman killing her baby girl at a woodshed. The woman can be assumed as Sethe because of her swollen foot. Behind by the open door, a young girl who is wearing a black dress with lace is Beloved with three vertical scratches on her forehead. Beloved, who is an embodied spirit of the murdered child, is watching her mother killing herself. Beloved is crying by the door but she cannot do anything about the murder because she is already dead. The point of view of this picture is Beloved, who is watching the scene in the back. Beloved in the back symbolizes that even though she knows she was killed by her mother, she does not know why Sethe killed her and how she felt when she was killing her own child, because she is looking from the back. Also in this picture, Sethe’s face is not fully shown, which also means that Beloved is not able to understand the feeling of Sethe when she was killing her child. Because Sethe killed her baby girl and the only thing that the murdered baby knows is the fact that she was killed by her mother, she comes back alive to her mother as Beloved with full of venom and anger.

Killing Beloved

In a novel “Beloved” by Toni Morrison, Sethe is a black slavery woman who suffers from the memory of her killing her own daughter. The daughter comes back to Sethe as Beloved, embodied spirit of the murdered daughter with venom and anger toward her mother. The moment of Sethe killing her daughter has tragic ramifications throughout the entire novel. Because of the infanticide, Sethe lost her two sons, Baby Suggs, the people in the town and the daughter Beloved. Without the occurrence of infanticide, the story would be totally different from the original novel.

When Sethe escaped from Sweet Home with her children, the four horsemen – schoolteacher, nephew, one slave catcher and a sheriff – came to the house on Bluestone Road where the runaway slaves were, including Sethe and her children. At first, the four horsemen thought they were too late to catch Sethe but they started to walk toward a shed when some other slave stared at the shed. “Inside, two boys bled in the sawdust and dirt at the feet of a nigger woman holding a blood-soaked child to her chest with one hand and an infant by the heels in the other. She did not look at them; she simply swung the baby toward the wall planks, missed and tried to connect a second time … “(Morrison 175). After Mr. Garner’s death, Sethe knew that unlike Mr. Garner, schoolteacher was same as other majority of whites, who can make the slaves to work, kill them, or dirty them. As she thought that she does not want their children to go through what she had been went through, she decided rather to kill their children by herself than to let it happen to the children. So she took all her children to the woodshed and killed her “Crawling Already?” girl, Beloved.

The fact that Beloved was killed by her mother led the entire story tragic that Sethe lost her sons and other people in the town. First, the baby girl who was killed by Sethe came back to Sethe’s house as a ghost. “124 was spiteful. Full of a baby’s venom.” (3) 124 is the house where Sethe and her alive daughter, Denver were living. Sethe’s sons, Howard and Buglar, left the house earlier “as soon as merely looking in a mirror shattered it (that was the signal for Buglar); as soon as two tiny hand prints appeared in the cake (that was the signal for Howard)” (3). Beloved was a baby when she was killed by her mother, so she returned to her mother as a ghost in the haunted house. If Sethe did not kill Beloved, the house would not be haunted with the baby’s venom. Because she killed her own daughter, people around her left her. For example, Howard and Buglar left the house not only because of the haunted house and the baby’s venom, but also because of the fact that their mother killed her own daughter and tried to kill them too. Also other black people in the town started to ignore the residents of 124.

Sethe killed her own child because she loved her and wanted to protect her from living as a black slave at Sweet Home – or anywhere in the world. In page 194, after Paul D found out that Sethe killed her child as she was escaping from Sweet Home, he said Sethe’s love is too thick. But Sethe replied to him that “Love is or it ain’t. Think love ain’t love at all … It ain’t my job to know what’s worse. It’s my job to know what is and to keep them away from what I know is terrible. I did that.” She told Paul D that she had to kill the children to keep them away from being slave, but Paul D said that decision was wrong. He added that “’You got two feet, Sethe, not four …’” Even Paul D who loved Sethe deeply in his heart, could not accept the fact that Sethe killed her own baby, and made him leave her.

Because Sethe killed Beloved her only alive daughter, Baby Suggs and Denver had to go through hardships as well. When Stamp Paid kept trying to get to 124 to talk to Sethe, he realized that he understood Baby suggs’ feeling too late. “The heart that pumped out love, the mouth that spoke the Word, didn’t prove or condemn Sethe’s rough choice. One or the other might have saved her, but beaten up by the claims of both, she went to bed” (212). Baby Suggs used to say the Word at the Clearing every Saturdays, but she refused to preach after Sethe’s act of infanticide. Also when Denver used to go to Lady Jones to learn to spell and count, she had to stop going to Lady Jones because of her mother’s past. Nelson Lord was a smart classmate, “who put a stop to it; who asked her the question about her mother that put chalk, the little I and all the rest that those afternoons held, out of reach forever.” Nelson Lord asked Denver the question about her mother’s infanticide out of curiosity, and she could not just laugh about it because Denver was actually wondering what happened for what reason. After that, she stopped going to the class and she became deaf because she did not want to hear the answer from her mother. Baby Suggs and Denver are important families to Sethe but she made them have hard time because of her past.

Lastly, Sethe’s act of infanticide made the murdered daughter to bear a grudge against her mother and return to Sethe as Beloved, the embodied spirit of murdered child. After Sethe found out that Beloved was the embodied spirit of her own daughter, she tried hard to explain how much she had suffered for her children for her whole life, but Beloved never listened. “None of which made the impression it was supposed to. Beloved accused her of leaving her behind. Of not being nice to her, not smiling at her. She said they were the same, had the same face, how could she have left her? And Sethe cried, saying she never did, or meant to – that she had to get them out, away … that her plan was always that they would all be together on the other side, forever. Beloved wasn’t interested. She said when she cried there was no one. That dead men lay on top of her. That she had nothing to eat” (284). Even though Sethe tried to explain and make Beloved understand what she went through and what she meant, Beloved was too young to understand her mother and the murder. She already had inveteracy deep inside.

There are moments or occurrences that have ramifications throughout the story in novels like Beloved. In Beloved, the moment when Sethe killed her own daughter made the tragic of the entire story and if this did not happen the story would be totally different than the original story. Because the daughter was murdered by Sethe, people in the town ignored Sethe and her family for a long time, and Sethe lost her sons and grandmother Baby Suggs, and the most important person, Beloved.

 

Morrison, Toni. Beloved: A Novel. New York: Knopf, 1987. Print.

reckon

Reckon (verb) : to think or suppose

(Merriam-Webster. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/reckon)

From Beloved. (Red book page 311. Paragraph 4)

“Used to be voices all round that place. Quiet, now,” Stamp said. “I been past it a few times and I can’t hear a thing. Chastened, I reckon,…”

Stamp Paid said there used to be voices in the place but now it’s quiet. He reckons (thinks) it had been chastened.

example: Because of the traffic, he couldn’t make it to the meeting, I reckon

Farewell to My Duty

Farewell to My Duty

Ever since Miss Emily’s father passed away, she had been staying in her house for years. I was the only connection to the town- but only when I need grocery or something for Miss Emily or for the house. When Homer Barron, a foreman of the construction company, came to the town for paving the sidewalks, Miss Emily started to come out to the town, driving in the yellow-wheeled buggy on Sunday afternoons. I saw the town people were surprised that she actually came out to the town. Not only that, but also it might be a shock that Miss Grierson, with dignity of her family and noblesse oblige, came out to the town because of this day laborer nigger like me. There cannot be any relationship between a nigger laborer and a noble family in any places in the world – even if the Grierson is being corrupted and Miss Emily might be the last person in the Grierson, I think. I grew up with Miss Emily in this house, and I saw her going through hard time after Mr. Grierson passed away, and even before that. I think I knew her feeling better than anyone else because I was the only one who had been staying with her in this house for years. It was just my duty that I have to take care of her and do anything to protect her, but I also have loyalty and compassion to her. So when the people in the town talked about Miss Grierson and Homer Barron, I pretended I did not hear anything as I have done for my whole life.

Miss Emily might know what other people in town would think about her falling in love with Homer Baron. I was sure that she cared about the town’s thoughts when I saw her getting poison. It was arsenic. She even went out to the town to get the poison by herself. If it was for rats, she would have told me to get it. I knew she got the poison because of Homer Barron but I did not know how she would use it. Is she going to kill herself? But I know she is not the type of person to kill herself because she cares about other people’s eyes. She is the tradition and the noble in Jefferson, and she can’t just kill herself because of love for a Northern laborer. But I cannot ask or tell her what to do because I am not in the position; luckily, regardless of my concern, she did not use the poison for herself.

Later Miss Emily ordered a man’s toilet set in silver with the letters H.B. on each piece. She also bought a complete outfit of men’s clothing, including a nightshirt. I wondered what she was planning to do; even her two cousins came over to the house. On the day the cousins came to the house, I overheard that they came because the town sent them a letter saying it would be a disgrace to the town and a bad example to the young people if Miss Emily and Homer Barron marry. When I looked at them, – they did not see me looking at them because I pretended I was just serving them a cup of tea – I felt like they were little different than Miss Emily. They looked full of egoism and prejudice that they were not even considering Miss Emily as a member of family. Maybe that was why they did not let me be next to Miss Emily when they were talking. And maybe, that was the reason why they left back to their home because they think nothing would happen. And even if anything happen to Miss Emily, it would not matter to them.

After the two ladies left, I had to clean a room in upstairs and furnish the room as for a bridal and Homer Barron came to the house couple of days later. I opened the door for him at dusk, Miss Emily, with sad smile on her face, greeted him. She took him to the bridal room, and that was the last time I saw Homer Barron.

It has been years now, and Miss Emily’s corpse is laid in this house and I know some other corpse is still in the abandoned room. In this morning I announced the town people that there is going to be funeral held for Miss Emily today. There are people coming: the men through a sort of respectful affection for a fallen monument, the women mostly out of curiosity to see the inside of her house. Poor my lady, poor Miss Emily, I thought. She had been a tradition, a history, and the last real lady in this town. But now she is laid dead, and the whole town does not look like they really came for Miss Emily’s farewell sincerely. How hollow and meaningless life she had lived! But now, after I have done with all of my duty for Miss Emily, after all these years in this dreadful house, I am leaving the house through this back door, and I say farewell to this house, to this town, and to Miss Emily.

 

Comparison of “A Rose for Emily” and retelling

“Farewell to My Duty” is a rewrite of William Faulkner’s story “A Rose for Emily” in a different point of view. The protagonist of the stories is Miss Emily. While the original story is narrated by the town people as in first person plural, the new version’s point of view is only one person, Tobe. Because the narrator is the town people in the original story, the story is developed by the facts that they observe outside of the house, and the thoughts how they feel about Miss Emily. However in the rewrite, the narrator is Tobe who lives together with Emily, probably for a long time, so he is able to observe her even inside of the house. The new narrator here, Tobe, is probably the one who knows about Miss Emily the most. Therefore the way how he describes about Miss Emily would be different from the town people’s point of view. In the original story, the town people talk about Miss Emily as a neighbor in their town, but Tobe is Miss Emily’s closest person; Tobe supposed to know more about Miss Emily. Therefore the original story shows the relationship between other people in the town and Miss Emily, whereas the new version focuses on describing the relationship with her closest person Tobe as well as with the town people. Therefore the description of the relationship between Tobe and Miss Emily is more credible and detailed in the new version than in the original version.

In the original story, the relationship between Miss Emily and the town people is well-described. In the town people’s point of view, “Miss Emily had been a tradition, a duty, and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town” because Miss Emily didn’t pay tax after her father passed away (section 1, paragraph 3). Even though most of the neighbor didn’t like her, they eager to know about Miss Emily just out of curiosity; some felt pity for her; some expected downfall of the Grierson. The town people care about what was happening to Miss Emily not because they really concerned about her health and comfort, but because they were just curious about her. People in the town considered her as some unsolved topic which they can gossip in gathering over years. Throughout the story, the neighbors knew all the details about Emily. For example, in section 3 paragraph 1, the narrator described the appearance of Miss Emily and Homer Barron with details. “Presently we began to see him and Miss Emily on Sunday afternoons driving in the yellow-wheeled buggy and the matched team of bays from the livery stable.” Also the town people knew that she bought arsenic and that she ordered a man’s toilet set and clothing. As we can see in the original story, the whole town had interests in her but just out of curiosity. Even though she didn’t interact with the people at all, they knew about Miss Emily quite well. Also in the story, the town assumed that Tobe would know everything about Miss Emily and tried to get some information about her from him. However they gave up asking him about her later. The narrator in the original story says “He[Tobe] talked to no one, probably not even to her, for his voice had grown harsh and rusty, as if from disuse” (section 4 second to the last paragraph). The only clue of their thoughts about the relationship between Miss Emily and Tobe was his voice; it was rusty from not using it and people can conclude that he doesn’t even talk to Emily. The original story describes well about the relationship between the town and Miss Emily, but there is a limitation of carrying the details about the relationship of Miss Emily and Tobe.

In the new version of the story, however, the narrator Tobe has access to in and out of the house. He has the ability to hear the gossips about Miss Emily when he goes out to the town, and he can watch Miss Emily’s movement as well. Also Tobe as a narrator can easily express his feelings and thoughts about Miss Emily so there are more details which describe the relationship between Tobe and Miss Emily. When Tobe as a narrator talks about the scene when Miss Emily greeted Homer Barron at dusk in paragraph 4, he describes Miss Emily’s face as “with sad smile on her face”. He already knew Miss Emily had bought a poison and furnished Homer Barron’s room as for a bridal. Also he knew “some other corpse is still in the abandoned room” because he never saw Homer Barron again after he went inside the room. He still didn’t mention it to anybody because of the duty to protect Miss Emily. Yet, it was stressful and gloomy staying in the “dreadful house”, but he still had respect for her and admitted that “she had been a tradition, a history, and the last real lady in this town.” (last paragraph). When Tobe found out that Miss Emily bought arsenic, he questioned to himself “Is she going to kill herself?”(paragraph 2) But soon he assumed that she would not kill herself because of a Northern laborer guy. Later even when she ordered a man’s toilet set and outfit, Tobe was wondering about the reason why she bought them, but he never asked her. He did not have any conversation with her not because he did not care about her, but because he trusted her. Also he knew he was “not in the position” to ask or tell her what to do (paragraph 2). Miss Emily was Tobe’s duty to take care of, but at the same time he also felt loyalty and compassion to her. He was the only one who really had respect for her and cared about Miss Emily. He says in the second paragraph; “luckily, regardless of my concern, she didn’t use the poison for herself.” Also when the town guessed that Miss Emily and Tobe didn’t have much of conversation because of his voice, it is not credible because they were just assuming. But when Tobe as a narrator actually mentions that he is not in the position to have conversation with Miss Emily, the readers can have accurate information compared to the imagination of the town people. Therefore the description of the relationship of Tobe and Miss Emily is more credible and detailed in the new version.

To conclude, the original story’s narrator focuses on the relationship between the town people and Miss Emily, whereas the new version’s narrator describes the relationship between Tobe and Miss Emily more effectively. Each point of view can provide us different information even though it is about a same story.

 

 

Comparison of “A Rose For Emily” and retelling

“Farewell to My Duty” is a rewrite of William Faulkner’s story “A Rose for Emily” in different point of view. The protagonist of the stories is Miss Emily. While the original story is narrated by the town people as in first person plural, the new version’s point of view is only one person, Tobe. In the original story, because the narrator is the town people, the story is developed by the facts that they observe outside of the house, and the thoughts how they feel about Miss Emily. However in the rewrite, the narrator is Tobe who lives together with Emily, probably for a long time, and who is able to observe her even inside of the house. The new narrator here, Tobe, is probably the one who knows about Miss Emily the most, therefore the way how he describes about Miss Emily would be different from the town people’s point of view.

The point of view of the new version is Miss Emily’s closest person. In the original story, the town people talk about Miss Emily as a neighbor in their town, but Tobe is Miss Emily’s closest person; Tobe supposed to know more about Miss Emily. Therefore the original story shows the relationship between other people in the town, but the new version describes the relationship with her closest person Tobe as well as with the town people.

For the town people’s point of view, “Miss Emily had been a tradition, a duty, and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town” because Miss Emily didn’t pay tax after her father passed away (section 1, paragraph 3). Even though most of the neighbor didn’t like her, they eager to know about Miss Emily just out of curiosity; some felt pity for her; some expected downfall of the Grierson. In the original story, the relationship between Miss Emily and the town people is well-described. The town people care about what was happening to Miss Emily not because they really concerned about her health and comfort, but because they were just curious about her. People in the town considered her as some unsolved topic which they can gossip in gathering over years. Throughout the story, the neighbors knew all the details about Emily. For example, in section 3 paragraph 1, the narrator described the appearance of Miss Emily and Homer Barron with details. “Presently we began to see him and Miss Emily on Sunday afternoons driving in the yellow-wheeled buggy and the matched team of bays from the livery stable.” Also the town people knew that she bought arsenic and that she ordered a man’s toilet set and clothing. As we can see in the original story, the whole town have interests in her but just out of curiosity. Even though she didn’t interact with the people at all, they knew about Miss Emily quite well.

In the story, the town assumed that Tobe would know everything about Miss Emily and tried to get some information about her from him. However they gave up asking him about her later. The narrator in the original story says “He[Tobe] talked to no one, probably not even to her, for his voice had grown harsh and rusty, as if from disuse” (section 4 second to the last paragraph). The only clue of their thoughts about the relationship between Miss Emily and Tobe was his voice; it was rusty from not using it and people can conclude that he doesn’t even talk to Emily. In the new version of the story, however, there are more details which describe the relationship between them. When Tobe found out that Miss Emily bought arsenic, he questioned to himself “Is she going to kill herself?” (paragraph 2) But soon he assumed that she would not kill herself because of a Northern laborer guy. Later even when she ordered a man’s toilet set and outfit, Tobe was wondering about the reason why she bought them, but he never asked her. He did not have any conversation with her not because he did not care about her, but because he trusted her. Also he knew he was “not in the position” to ask or tell her what to do (paragraph 2). Miss Emily was Tobe’s duty to take care of, but at the same time he also felt loyalty and compassion to her. He was the only one who really had respect for her and cared about Miss Emily. He says in the second paragraph; “luckily, regardless of my concern, she didn’t use the poison for herself.” Lastly, when Tobe as a narrator talks about the scene when Miss Emily greeted Homer Barron at dusk in paragraph 4, he describes Miss Emily’s greeting “with sad smile on her face”. He already knew Miss Emily had bought a poison and furnished Homer Barron’s room as for a bridal. Also he knew “some other corpse is still in the abandoned room” because he never saw Homer Barron again after he went inside the room. He still didn’t mention it to anybody because of the duty to protect Miss Emily. Yet, it was stressful and gloomy staying in the “dreadful house”, but he still had respect for her and admitted that “she had been a tradition, a history, and the last real lady in this town.” (last paragraph).

To conclude, the original story’s narrator focuses on the relationship between the town people and Miss Emily, whereas the new version’s narrator describes the relationship between Tobe and Miss Emily more effectively. Each point of view can provide us different information even though it is a same story.

Astonishing

Astonishing (adj) – causing a feeling of great surprise or wonder

source : merriam-webster

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/astonishing

Found in “The Cottagette” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman (page 51 paragraph 7)

So I was pleased, though it did interfere with my work a good deal. I always work best in the morning; but of course housework has to be done in the morning too; and it is astonishing how much work there is in the littlest kitchen.

She needs to do her work in the morning but at the same time she has to finish her housework as well. The amount of work in the small kitchen makes her surprise or wonder because there is a lot to do in the kitchen in the morning.

 

Farewell to my duty.

Ever since Miss Emily’s father passed away, she had been staying in her house for years. I was the only connection to the town- but only when I need grocery or something for Miss Emily or for the house. When Homer Barron, a foreman of the construction company, came to the town for paving the sidewalks, Miss Emily started to come out to the town, driving in the yellow-wheeled buggy on Sunday afternoons. I saw the town people were surprised that she actually came out to the town. Not only that, but also it might be a shock that Miss Grierson, with dignity of her family and noblesse oblige, came out to the town because of this day laborer nigger like me. There cannot be any relationship between a nigger laborer and a noble family in any places in the world – even if the Grierson is being corrupted and Miss Emily might be the last person in the Grierson, I think. I grew up with Miss Emily in this house, and I saw her going through hard time after Mr. Grierson passed away, and even before that. I think I knew her feeling better than anyone else because I was the only one who had been staying with her in this house for years. It was just my duty that I have to take care of her and do anything to protect her, but I also have loyalty and compassion to her. So when the people in the town talked about Miss Grierson and Homer Barron, I pretended I didn’t hear anything as I’ve done for my whole life.

Miss Emily might know what other people in town would think about her falling in love with Homer Baron. I was sure that she cared about the town’s thoughts when I saw her getting poison. It was arsenic. She even went out to the town to get the poison by herself. If it was for rats, she would’ve told me to get it. I knew she got the poison because of Homer Barron but I didn’t know how she would use it. Is she going to kill herself? But I know she is not the type of person to kill herself because she cares about other people’s eyes. She is the tradition and the noble in Jefferson, and she can’t just kill herself because of love for a Northern laborer. But I cannot ask or tell her what to do because I am not in the position; luckily, regardless of my concern, she didn’t use the poison for herself.

Later Miss Emily ordered a man’s toilet set in silver with the letters H.B. on each piece. She also bought a complete outfit of men’s clothing, including a nightshirt. I wondered what she was planning to do; even her two cousins came over to the house. On the day the cousins came to the house, I overheard that they came because the town sent them a letter saying it would be a disgrace to the town and a bad example to the young people if Miss Emily and Homer Barron marry. When I looked at them, – they didn’t see me looking at them because I pretended I was just serving them a cup of tea – I felt like they were little different than Miss Emily. They looked full of egoism and prejudice that they were not even considering Miss Emily as a member of family. Maybe that was why they didn’t let me be next to Miss Emily when they were talking. And maybe, that was the reason why they left back to their home because they think nothing would happen. And even if anything happen to Miss Emily, it wouldn’t matter to them.

After the two ladies left, I had to clean a room in upstairs and furnish the room as for a bridal and Homer Barron came to the house couple of days later. I opened the door for him at dusk, Miss Emily, with sad smile on her face, greeted him. She took him to the bridal room, and that was the last time I saw Homer Barron.

It has been years now, and Miss Emily’s corpse is laid in this house and I know some other corpse is still in the abandoned room. In this morning I announced the town people that there is going to be funeral held for Miss Emily today. There are people coming: the men through a sort of respectful affection for a fallen monument, the women mostly out of curiosity to see the inside of her house. Poor my lady, poor Miss Emily, I thought. She had been a tradition, a history, and the last real lady in this town. But now she is laid dead, and the whole town doesn’t look like they really came for Miss Emily’s farewell sincerely. How hollow and meaningless life she had lived! But now, after I’ve done with all of my duty for Miss Emily, after all these years in this dreadful house, I am leaving the house through this back door, and I say farewell to this house, to this town, and to Miss Emily.

 

Atrocious

Atrocious (adj) – very bad, of very poor quality, horrifying

Source: Merriam-Webster

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/atrocious

Found in “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. page 59, paragraph 7

I am sitting by the window now, up in this atrocious nursery, and there is nothing to hinder my writing as much as I please, save lack of strength.

She (the narrator) came to this new house for cure of her depression with her husband, but since the beginning of the story, her description of this house is very unpleasant and negative. And she is not getting better at all although she is staying in the house for her nursery.  So the nursery she is having right now is not really good or effective. Also she feels like the house is haunted and she doesn’t like the house where she has to stay for the summer for nursery. She might feel like she is in horrifying or cruel nursery.