Author: Zachary Mccallum

Virtual Coffeehouse – Optional

As the new semester started things were normal and off to a great start. Just like a few other people stated this new semester was kind of exciting. It was like a fresh start. However, once everything started to happen it started to happen fast. Things started to become confusing and I found myself getting frustrated. As much as I tried to get adjusted I could never really get fully adjusted. Even though there were negative effects there were positives too. I got to spend more time with my family, improve a new skill, and got to be in the comfort of my home more.

Essay 3 Draft

Zachary McCallum 

English 1121 (Prof. Scanlan) 

05/10/2020 

 

 

¬†‚ÄėNew York Day Women‚Äô Literary Research Paper¬†

 

‚ÄúNew York Day Women‚ÄĚ by Edwidge Danticat focuses primarily on a mother and daughter who immigrated to the U.S from Haiti. Suzette (the daughter)¬†is on a lunch break in Manhattan when she catches her mother out and about. This throws¬†Suzette¬†off guard because according to her, her mother has never¬†left Brooklyn and is wary about taking the train.¬†Suzette follows her mother around to see what she‚Äôs¬†up¬†to.¬†¬†

 

¬†In the article ‚ÄúOral narrative as short story cycle: forging community in Edwidge Danticat’s Krik?¬†Krak!‚ÄĚ,¬†Rocio G. Davis¬†dives into topics such as motherhood, womanhood,¬†class issues and much more.¬†While¬†Rocio G. Davis‚Äô¬†article dives into those¬†topics,¬†‚ÄúMothering the¬†Motherless:¬†Portrayals of¬†alternative¬†mothering, practicing within the Caribbean¬†diaspora‚Ä̬†by¬†Amanda Putnam adds the focus of¬†identifying¬†one’s¬†self¬†along with¬†motherhood.¬†Both¬†articles share¬†a strong message¬†of motherhood,¬†feminism, class issues and¬†self-empowerment.¬†With these documents, I will show how¬†‚ÄúNew York Day Women‚ÄĚ exhibits¬†self-awareness and¬†feminist ethics¬†which¬†the main character goes through due to the help of her mother¬†with the article by Amanda Putnam.¬†After this, I will go into detail about¬†the¬†strong¬†sense of¬†motherhood and¬†feminist ethics¬†in ‚ÄúNew York Day Women‚ÄĚ with Rocio G. Davis‚Äô article.¬†

 

Throughout the story Suzanne‚Äôs recalls bits of advice and messages¬†that her mother use¬†to give her throughout her lifetime. Through her mother‚Äôs¬†guidance and counsel Suzanne becomes¬†enlightened¬†towards the end of the¬†short story.¬†For instance, in ‚ÄúMothering the Motherless: Portrayals of alternative mothering, practicing within the Caribbean diaspora‚ÄĚ Amanda Putnam states ‚ÄúMerle Hodge‚Äôs Crick Crack Monkey and Edwidge Danticat‚Äôs¬†‚ÄúKrik?¬†Krak!‚ÄĚ,¬†offer similar collective mothering practices, showing women within a¬†community¬†nurturing¬†daughters¬†whose mothers are absent. Their purpose is to help the daughters acquire qualities which will allow them to develop into strong adult women‚ÄĚ (Putnam¬†1).¬†Even though Suzette‚Äôs mother in ‚ÄúDay Women‚Ä̬†(apart of Krik?¬†Krak!)¬†was not an absent parent, her mother gave her advice and taught her about life lessons¬†that makes Suzette reflect on her life.¬†This¬†results in her becoming a better woman.¬†For example, in the short story¬†‚ÄúNew York Day Women‚Ä̬†Suzette‚Äôs mothers¬†asks¬†her if she would give her seat up for an elderly lady.¬†Suzette‚Äôs¬†says sometimes she does but, sometimes she doesn‚Äôt.¬†In the third paragraph she says ‚ÄúMy mother, who is often right about that. Sometimes I get up and give my seat. Other times, I don‚Äôt. It all depends on how¬†pregnant the woman is and whether or not¬†he¬†is sitting down‚Ä̬†(Danticat 1).¬†However, at the end of the short story when Suzette is done with her reminiscent thoughts of her mother, she self reflects and decides that when she takes the subway from that day¬†forward,¬†she will give up her seat for an elderly¬†lady¬†or a woman who was pregnant. This not only shows self-awareness but the presence of¬†feminist ethics. She¬†takes¬†consciousness¬†of her actions and who she is and then changes her actions. The¬†feminist ethics kicks in when she finds a¬†newfound¬†appreciation for women. I say this¬†because¬†she doesn‚Äôt just say she‚Äôs going to give up her seat for and¬†elderly¬†woman like her mother but also a pregnant woman.¬†Feminist ethics is a type of ethic that values women and that is what Suzette did at the end of the short story.¬†¬†

 

In ‚ÄúOral narrative as¬†Short¬†Story¬†Cycle¬†Forging¬†Community in Edwidge Danticat‚Äôs Krik? Krak!‚Ä̬†by Rocio G. Davis, the speaker¬†emphasizes¬†motherhood and feminist ethics within his article.¬†The article says ‚ÄúCorollary to this, the story entitled ‚ÄėNew York Day Women‚Äô has a daughter watching,¬†unobserved, as her mother makes her way from her home in¬†Brooklyn, to Madison Avenue where in Central Park¬†she cares for a young child while her Yuppie mother goes jogging : ‚ÄėThis mother of mine, she stops at another hot-dog vendor and buys a frankfurter that she eats on the street. I never knew that she ate frankfurters… Day women come out when nobody expects them‚Äô (150,153). Both stories emphasize the different worlds mothers and children inhabit while linking their mothers. Furthermore, issues of race and class oppression suggested in both stories serve as factors that¬†complicate¬†maternal relationships because they lead the mothers to find ways of surviving or of asserting independence they cannot, or will not,¬†share with their children‚Ä̬†(Davis 76).¬†This quotation from the article highlights¬†motherhood¬†in ‚ÄúNew York Day Women‚Ä̬†because it¬†correlates¬†with Suzette‚Äôs mother taking care of other people‚Äôs children¬†but also touches on the mothership¬†that¬†Suzette‚Äôs mom¬†has with her daughter.¬†For example, Rocio G Davis talks about how Suzette‚Äôs mother¬†didn‚Äôt¬†tell¬†her daughter about her¬†day job¬†which¬†affected her¬†relationship with her child. Even though, Suzette found a new¬†appreciation¬†for her¬†mother¬†I am pretty¬†sure she still wondered why her mother never told¬†her anything about her babysitting job.¬†¬†

 

The speaker also¬†shows feminist ethics within¬†his article¬†when he states ‚ÄúIn a note distributed by her publisher, Danticat defines the challenge she set herself: “I look to the past to Haiti-hoping that the extraordinary female story tellers I grew up with the ones that have passed on will choose to tell their stories through my voice. For those of us who have a voice must speak to the present and the past” (qtd. in Casey 525-26). Danticat’s narrative presents the voices and visions of women, usually mothers and daughters, whose personal tragedies impel them to form community¬†in the midst of¬†oppression and exile‚Ä̬†(Davis¬†68).¬†This shows¬†feminist¬†ethics¬†because¬†it shows how Edwidge Danticat‚Äôs writing displays how women overcome¬†persecution and expulsion. She shows woman in a strong light that does not conform into traditional¬†normative¬†ethics.¬†¬†

 

The writing of Edwidge Danticat is a writing that is not common to find. She writes with experience, emotion and warmth. With ‚ÄúNew York Day Women‚ÄĚ she manages to teach the readers a lesson or two about self-assurance and respect whether the reader be man or woman.¬†‚ÄúNew York Day Women‚ÄĚ did an excellent job of publicizing¬†self-empowerment, motherhood, and feminist ethics.¬†¬†

Essay 3 First Page – Zachary M.

Zachary McCallum 

English 1121 (Prof. Scanlan) 

05/10/2020 

 

 

¬†‚ÄėNew York Day Women‚Äô Literary Research Paper¬†

 

‚ÄúNew York Day Women‚ÄĚ by Edwidge Danticat focuses primarily on a mother and daughter who immigrated to the U.S from Haiti. Suzette (the daughter)¬†is on a lunch break in Manhattan when she catches her mother out and about. This throws her off guard because according to her, her mother has never¬†left Brooklyn and is wary about taking the train.¬†Suzette follows her mother around to see what she‚Äôs¬†up¬†to.¬†¬†

 

¬†In the article ‚ÄúOral¬†narrative as short story cycle: forging community in Edwidge Danticat’s Krik?¬†Krak!‚ÄĚ,¬†Rocio G. Davis¬†dives into topics such as motherhood, womanhood,¬†class issues and much more.¬†While¬†Rocio G. Davis‚Äô¬†article dives into those¬†specific¬†topics ‚ÄúMothering the¬†Motherless:¬†Portrayals of¬†alternative¬†mothering, practicing within the Caribbean¬†diaspora‚Ä̬†by¬†Amanda Putnam adds the focus of¬†identifying¬†one’s¬†self¬†along with¬†motherhood.¬†Both¬†articles share¬†a strong message¬†of motherhood, feminism, class issues and¬†self-empowerment.¬†In an effort to¬†show this, I will show how¬†‚ÄúNew York Day Women‚ÄĚ exhibits¬†a strong sense of motherhood and feminist ethics¬†which allows the main character to grow into a more¬†well-defined¬†woman. After this, I will go into detail about¬†the¬†self-awareness¬†the¬†main character goes through¬†due to the help of her mother.¬†¬†

 

Throughout the story Suzanne’s recalls bits of advice and messages that her mother used to give her throughout her lifetime. Through her mother’s guidance and counsel Suzanne became enlightened.  

 

 

 (251 words)

Research Prospectus – Zach McCallum

Zachary McCallum 

Research Prospectus  

English 1121 (Prof. Scanlan) 

May 3, 2020 

  

  1. The author of ‚ÄúNew York Day Women‚ÄĚ is Edwidge Danticat. I¬†liked¬†this story because it¬†shows how the readers mother overcame¬†and easily adjusted into the new world.¬†¬†

 

  1. The speaker catches her mother out and about in a place where she never pictured her mother to be. Her mother (according to the speaker) has never left Brooklyn. However, she finds her mother in Manhattan. She stealthily follows her mother around. While she follows her mother, she remembers advice and memories of her mother when she was younger.     

  

  1. The Daughter- Moved to Brooklyn from Haiti with her family when she was a young girl. A decision she makes is to follow her mother to the park where she surprisingly founds out what her mother does on a day to day basis. She also makes the decision to give up her seat for an older woman or pregnant woman.  

       The Mother- Came to Brooklyn from Haiti with her husband and young daughter. A decision she makes is to take care of the children of others in the day at the park along with other women. In addition, another choice she chooses to make is to take control of her life and get a grip on this new world she’s never experienced. 

 

  1. Mother¬†(Ethics)–¬†In this short story the speaker‚Äôs mother exhibits feminist ethics. The reason is because¬†her taking babysitting/taking care of other children is a traditional normative for women. She also shows¬†¬†

¬† ¬† ¬† Daughter (Ethics)- In ‚ÄúNew York Day Women‚ÄĚ the daughter (speaker) shows deontology ethics. I say this because in the¬†beginning she said that she usually wouldn‚Äôt give up her seat for an elderly but, in the end she remembers her¬†mother’s¬†words and realizes that giving up her seat is the right thing to do.¬†¬†

 

(312 worlds) 

Virtual Coffeehouse

Zachary McCallum 

English 1121 

May 3, 2020 

  

During this pandemic I’ve been trying to learn how to bake. I never really been hands on in the kitchen.¬†I‚Äôve been baking with my sister and grandmother. My grandmother has been our baking mentor since quarantine. She‚Äôs not much of a baker herself but she‚Äôs been trying to help us anyway. So far¬†me and my sister have made apple pie,¬†cookies, and brownies. It‚Äôs been¬†pretty exciting¬†because I‚Äôm not used to being in the kitchen. Also, eating something you‚Äôve put work into has a satisfactory feeling.¬†¬†

I’m looking forward to baking more desserts. Hopefully, my skills will increase as time flies by and I’ll be able to bake more advance desserts.  

Journal 6 – Zachary McCallum

Zachary McCallum

Professor Scanlan

Journal 6

04/26/2020

 

In ‚ÄúNew York Day Women‚ÄĚ by Edwidge Danticat the speaker tells a short story of a Haitian family who moved to the U.S. It focuses on the mother and daughter of the family who are the main characters. The story takes place in New York and is spoken in present tense. The daughter catches her mother out and about in a place where she never pictured her mother to be. Her mother (according to the speaker) has never left Brooklyn. However, she finds her mother in Manhattan. She stealthily follows her mother around. While she follows her mother, she remembers advice and memories of her mother when she was younger.

For example, she recalls when her mother asked if she would give up her seat for and ‚Äúold lady‚ÄĚ like her. The speaker said that she would give up her seat sometimes but, not all the time. However, towards the end of the story she shows growth and says when she gets on the subway later that day, she will give up her seat for somebody her mother‚Äôs age. What motivates her to give up her seat is her newfound appreciation and respect for her mother and all women. While she followed her mother, she gained admiration for her mother to see the hard work she puts into a day to day basis. She ends up finding out that her mother babysits other people‚Äôs children along with other women.

The story shows how the speaker’s mother has assimilated into the new world. In the beginning, she remembers how her mother would have difficulty getting adjusted into American culture. Watching her interact easily with the vendors, bikers, and children showed the speaker that her mother was going to be okay. It a pleasant turnaround for her to see her mother adjust well into the new world.

 

(312 words)

“Where I’m From” Explication Essay – Zachary McCallum

Zachary McCallum

04/08/2020

English 1121-D398 (Prof. Scanlan)

Poetry Explication

 

 

Explication of Where I’m From by Willie Perdomo

 

‚ÄúWhere I‚Äôm From‚ÄĚ gives a deep description of the area in which the author lives. When a woman asks where the speaker is from, he remembers the positive and negative occurrences in his neighborhood. Willie Perdomo‚Äôs description gives the poem a tone in which things that appear to be alarming compared to the norm is quite standard to where he lives. With his words he manages to show the readers the hidden allure of where he is from masked by negative occurrences. The speaker subtly describes the injustice in his community with a tone of aggravation. He gives the readers a glimpse of the relationship his neighbors have with the police in his area. This includes him describing the pointless harassment and murders of the people in his neighborhood. The two lines in the middle of the poem; ‚ÄúWhere I‚Äôm from, the police come into your house without knocking. They throw us off rooftops and say we slipped,‚ÄĚ are one of the most significant lines in this poem. These lines represent symbolism and have assonance that describe the exploitation in his area. The explication of these two lines will describe the injustice of the people in his community that seem to be a norm.

In the first line, ‚ÄúWhere I‚Äôm from, the police come into your house without knocking,‚ÄĚ Willie Perdomo shows the readers the abuse of power by authority in his neighborhood. The tone of this line shows that the author is annoyed. I can tell he is irritated through his choice of words. He says ‚Äúwithout knocking‚ÄĚ as if the police do not have the right to be in his or anybody else‚Äôs house without warning. Even though, this line is very straight forward it also symbolizes the lack of freedom that the people in his area have. The police in his community have made people feel unsafe in their own home just because they are able to. The author uses assonance in the first line with the words from and come which gives that part of the poem a certain flow.

The second line, ‚ÄúThey throw us off rooftops and say we slipped,‚ÄĚ the speaker uses graphic imagery to show the readers the perilous injustice that goes on in his neighborhood. Based off this line it shows the deaths of people in his community in which the police have not taken accountability for. He also shows how the police can get away with their wrongdoing by being untruthful. This line is very straight forward and easy to understand. He narrates his community‚Äôs unpleasant run ins with the authority. Willie Perdomo describes it in a way as if it is something that he is not pleased about but accepts. He realizes that there are just some things that cannot be changed where he is from. Even though, he comes to terms with the tyranny in where he lives, it is clear it still puts on him edge.

With these lines combined, Willie Perdomo exposes the inequality that the people in his community face. The speaker skillfully describes his everyday life in which the things that seem to be normal to him should not really be normal at all. Even though, I chose two lines from the poem that highlight the negative, the author also chose to show the positive in his neighborhood. He ends his poem on a positive note which shows the multidimensionality of where he is from. Although most of the poem is related to violence, class issues, and the grapple of the author’s neighborhood, the last stanza exhibits an instance of beauty, morality, and the affinity that we have with family.

 

(623 words)

 

Zachary’s Reflection

Ever since the outbreak, it seems that it’s getting worse day by day. People are out of jobs, filing for unemployment is at an all time high, kids are out of school (etc.). It definitely sucks having to stay home for so long. I like being outside and hanging out with friends. It’s just something I’m going to have to adjust to for a while.

During these past two weeks, I’ve been spending more time with my family. We usually don’t get to spend a lot of time together due to work and education. However, since we’re stuck here together it’s not like we have a choice. I’ve also been watching movies and new television shows to occupy my time.

Zachary McCallum – Explication Draft

Zachary McCallum

04/08/2020

English 1121-D398 (Prof. Scanlan)

Poetry Explication

 

 

Explication of Where I’m From by Willie Perdomo

¬†‚ÄúWhere I‚Äôm From‚ÄĚ gives a deep description of the area in which the author lives. When a woman asks where the speaker is from, he remembers the positive and negative occurrences in his neighborhood. Willie Perdomo‚Äôs description gives the poem a tone in which things that appear to be alarming compared to the norm is quite standard to where he lives. With his words he manages to show the readers the hidden allure of where he‚Äôs from masked by negative occurrences. The speaker subtly describes the injustice in his community with a tone of aggravation. He gives the readers a glimpse of the relationship his neighbors have with the police in his area. This includes him describing the pointless harassment and murders of the people in his neighborhood. The two lines in the middle of the poem; ‚ÄúWhere I‚Äôm from, the police come into your house without knocking. They throw us off rooftops and say we slipped,‚ÄĚ are one of the most significant lines in this poem. It describes the injustice of the people in his community that seem to be a norm.

In the first line, ‚ÄúWhere I‚Äôm from, the police come into your house without knocking,‚ÄĚ Willie Perdomo shows the readers the abuse of power by authority in his neighborhood. Even though, this line is very straight forward it also symbolizes the lack of freedom that the people in his area have. The police in his community have made people feel unsafe in their own home just because they are able to. In addition, the author uses assonance in the first line with the words from and come.

In the second line, ‚ÄúThey throw us off rooftops and say we slipped,‚ÄĚ the speaker uses graphic imagery to show the readers the perilous injustice that goes on in his neighborhood. He also shows how the police are able to get away with their wrongdoing by being untruthful. ¬†This line is very straight forward and easy to understand. He narrates his community‚Äôs unpleasant confrontations with the authority. Willie Perdomo describes it in a way as if it‚Äôs something that he‚Äôs not pleased with but accepts. He realizes that there are just some things that cannot be changed where he‚Äôs from. Even though, he comes to terms with the tyranny in where he lives, it is clear it still puts him on edge.