WEEK 6 ACTIVITIES (Monday Holiday/Tuesday follows Monday Classes)

Great work on last week’s posts students. Keep in mind that today is a holiday and tomorrow (Tuesday) follows your Monday schedule. As such, I will not hold office hours tomorrow.

Ruth Ginsburg’s Lace Collar

For next week, keep reading The Scarlet Letter and watch the film version (and hopefully the RBG documetary). I also ask that you read the article below on Ruther Bader Ginsburg’s Lace Collar. Keep in mind that Hester Prynne’s Red Letter (“A”) is made of lace and that Hester makes a living sewing lace clothes for the ministers and community (they hate her but still buy her products!!!). Think more about the strength and importance of this fabric. Like Hester’s scarlet “A” it is a great example of “symbolism.” Also try to connect Hester Prynne’s strong will and character to Ruther Bader Ginsburg. I look forward to reading what you have to say.

Read : 1) from Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter (1850):

                Chapters XVI (“A Forest Walk”) and XVII (“The Pastor and the                      

                Parishioner”) (pages 231-245)

           2) “Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Lace Collar”

View:  1) The Scarlet Letter (Film 1995)  [On Amazon Prime] SIGN UP FOR A STUDENT VERSION OF AMAZON PRIOME FOR 1/2 PRICE FILMS!!!!

AND/OR

2) The Notorious RBG (A Documentary on the Life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg)

Post:  Post a response to one of the chapters from The Scarlet Letter (XVI or XVII) and the film version of novel OR the RBG documentary.

YOUR POST IS DUE BY SATURDAY, OCT. 3RD.

30 Comments

  1. Manija Shouff

    Hello Professor,
    The assignment for this week, is that due on Thursday (1st Oct)?

    • Mark

      No, by Saturday, Oct 3rd. I will make this clear. Thanks for checking with me.

  2. Jingquan Feng

    After I finished the film “RBG.” I feel that she looked weak, but she was stronger than anyone else. At Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s early age, she started to study law at Harvard Law School in 1957, and she was the only female student in the class. I am surprised about the percentage between the male and female students in the picture shown in the film. And she did mention she felt being watch constantly because there was not many female study law; at that time, people think that women should stay at home and take care of the family. In the film, Ginsburg also mentioned that she forbade to enter the library because of her gender. All the elements point to one thing, Sexism, and this is the reason that she wants to become a lawyer to change the situation. Also, the reason that I said Ruth Bader Ginsburg was stronger than anyone else is that she was studying her law and taking care of her family at the same time; not everyone can do it. After she finished her degree, she also got a lot of trouble when she tries to get into a law firm because of her gender. Therefore, being a woman at that time was not a good thing.
    In the movie, there was another example of Sexism. A female lieutenant named “Sharron Frontiero.” She did not get the benefits that she supposes to have in the army, and the people in the military said: “you are lucky that the air force allows you to serve.” Then the Ginsburg team found her and started the revolution of anti-sexism. In my opinion, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a fighter on anti-sexism. She did not only stand for women, but she also helps male to solve their problem like; in the film, there was a Single parent family father got trouble to claim the benefit with the social service because that benefit only for woman. About woman’s rights, I also want to point out something that some females use their right to take advantage of males. I heard some news about males being falsely accused of sexual harassment or domestic violence, which has become a new problem in modern society. When it comes to the victim shift from female to male, people seem like they don’t care about it. I think this doesn’t seem right and against the idea of anti-sexism.

    • Mark

      Excellent response Feng. I particularly like your pick-up that “Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a fighter on anti-sexism. She did not only stand for women, but she also helped malse to solve their problems as well” Nicely stated and an important point.

  3. Mark

    Great film. I loved it.

  4. Jannatul Fateha

    Response to “The Scarlet Letter” chapter 16:

    According to the narrator, Pearl “wanted [lacked] grief that would deeply touch her and thus humanize and make her capable of sympathy.” This passage foreshadows grief in Pearl’s future that will, indeed, “humanize” her as she transcends the “symbolic” role she performs in her mother’s life. Apart from the foreshadowing of Pearl’s fate, this passage offers (it seems to me) a wise perception regarding the human psyche. Throughout “The Scarlet Letter”, Nathaniel Hawthorne uses the motif of sunshine to not only symbolize Hester’s place in society but to describe Pearl’s place as well. From the start of the book, Hester has been the character ostracized by society. Because of her sins, they look down on her, and she looks down upon herself. In the novel, the sunshine avoids Hester. Instead, a shadow is always cast on Hester. The sunshine is a symbol of purity and innocence. Since birth, Pearl has always been in the sunshine. She has not sinned like her mother, and society does not view her like she is the daughter of a sinner. Until she ignores her own self-loathing and the society’s dislike of her, the sunshine will not shine on Hester. Pearl, on the other hand, has not sinned and does not feel self-loathing; therefore, the sunshine is drawn near her.

    Response to the film version of the novel OR the RBG documentary:

    RBG is an American documentary film focusing on the life and career of the second female Supreme Court of the United States Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg famously known as Notorious RBG. The movie was very inspiring, moving, and relevant to the present because we are still trying to change archaic laws and bumping up against people who don’t want change because of their fears of what it might mean and how it could affect them in the future. It was also a beautiful love story of husband & wife who loved, encouraged, and supported each other through hardships. It is a stunning tale about a woman who was instrumental in changing the course of the American landscape for both women and minorities by being the voice of dissent and standing up for it.

    • Mark

      Wonderfully insightful responses to both the SL chapters and the film on RBG, Jannatul.
      I particularly liked your point that “sunshine not only symbolized Hester’s place in society described Pearl’s place as well. From the start of the book, Hester has been the character ostracized by society.” You picked up on the key point of the novel. It’s also important that by the end of the novel, Hester plays an important role counseling members (especially young women) of society (a little like RBG!)

  5. Lisbeth Rivas

    After watching The Scarlet Letter, I got to see how the relationship between Hester Prynne and Dimmesdale began. Which we do not get to see much of that in the book considering that in the book Hester lover was unknown at first. Hester immediately caught the attention of many of the townspeople because of how different she was from others, mainly the women. Many thought that it was bizarre for a woman to live by herself since her husband was not there to keep her company, but Hester did not see the problem. Hester is not like most of the women in town; I think it is what intrigued Dimmesdale the most. Both Hester and Dimmesdale held off their love for one another once Dimmesdale finds out Hester is married. Shortly after it is found out that Hester’s husband was captured by the Native Americans and presumed dead. Hester and Dimmesdale then go on to have their affair. Hester received very harsh punishments and was publicly humiliated several times. In the movie, Dimmesdale’s character goes through a great debate about whether or not he should come forward so that Hester does not take all the fault for the sin they both committed. Later on, just like the book, Hester’s “dead” husband tries to seek revenge against Dimmesdale once he finds out that he is the father of Pearl and the lover of Hester. In the movie, they do not go into great detail about her skill of sewing or what it is like having to raise Pearl in a community that is shameful towards her and her mother. The book and the movie have different ending’s nonetheless, the characters were nearly the same as in the book. Hester did not once break instead she kept pushing forward. In the end, the letter A no longer held such a negative connotation but rather something beautiful. In chapter 16, Pearl begins to become more aware of her surroundings and begins to wonder why her mom wears the letter A on her dress and why people treat her mother the way they do in town. She begins to analyze interactions between Dimmesdale who, she refers to as “Black man.” Pearl notices that Dimmesdale always has a hand over his heart making her wonder if he has a mark just like her mother. Hester does not want to explain the reason why she has the letter A to pearl because she feels that she is too young to understand, but Pearl herself is beginning to take notice.

    In the article “Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Lace Collar.” talks about how Ruth would wear these beautiful collars from all around the world and what they signified, and the reason why the collar became her thing. She started wearing these collars to feminize a traditional uniform that was mainly worn by men. When Ruth joined the court, a lot of women were wearing suits so that women; can be taken seriously. It was already hard being a woman and more so being a woman in the workforce during the 1930s. Dressing too girlie would make others not perceive women as serious. Ruth’s point in wearing her collar was for others to understand “why could a woman not be both feminine and substantive.”

    • Manija Shouff

      After reading both chapters, the chapter that got my attention was chapter XVII. I did not expect the reverend to be the father of Pearl, that was a surprise. People usually see a priest to repent and here is the priest who has committed a sin. Interesting how Hester took all the blame for everything, even after 7 years she still wearing the scarlet letter. When she met Arthur in the woods, Pearl noticed that he always has his hand on his heart. At first, I thought he must have had heart problems; 7 years did pass but it is the guilt that has been disturbing him. It is ironic, a priest that helps people not to commit a sin but himself could not resist. This scene also tells me that Hester and Arthur love each other, it explains now why Hester took all the blame for all those years.

      The “Scarlet letter” movie, is completely different from what I have read. The movie starts off with a native American running in the woods with a flame, later Hester arrives to the new land with others. There was one man that said something to Hester “Madam, you will do well if you use less lace” this “lace” foreshadows the sin that Hester later will commit. The movie talks about witches and how the savages are cruel, while in the reading I have not seen that. After the reverend tells Hester about her husband’s death, that’s when Hester commits adultery. Also, in the reading Pearl is 6 yrs. old or 7yrs old and talks while in the movie she is about 4 or 5 years old and does not talk. In the movie, Chillingworth brainwashes everyone into believing that Pearl is a witch just because she has a witch’s mark. I did not like the movie as it had too many differences. But one thing for sure, Hester is blunt about everything, she speaks her mind, she has read books, highly intelligent woman.

    • Mark

      Very thorough discussion of the novel Lisbeth. You also make fine points about the film on RBG. Clearly, Hester and Ruth are true individuals as you suggest and both help to make women (and men — as with Dimmsdale) better individuals themselves.

  6. Brianna Lesperences

    Response to Chapter XVI
    Once reading chapter XVI ( A Forest Walk) from the novel “The Scarlett Letter” I was able to get an insight on Pearl and Hester’s relationship as mother and daughter. In the beginning of the chapter Pearl talked about the sunshine not liking her mother while also pointing out the embroidered letter on her mother’s chest “”mother” said little Pearl “the sunshine does not love you. It runs away and hides itself, because it’s afraid of something on your bosom””. As the story continues you are able to see how Pearl is quite a lonely child due to her mother’s actions, later on in the chapter she is compared to the brook tree “Pearl resembled the brook, inasmuch as the current of her life gushed from a well-spring as mysterious…” As Pearl continues to talk about the sunshine with her mother she makes an inference that she would have to eventually carry on that scarlett letter once she gets older.

    Response To RGB Documentary
    After watching the RGB documentary I’ve learned a lot about the second woman on the supreme court. Ruth Bader Ginsburg was 1 of 9 female among the males in Harvard in which she talked about her struggles of wanting to showcase her intelligence while also feeling like she was constantly being watched by the men in her class. One man that was not threaten by her intelligence would be her husband Martin, he fully supported her and even gloated about her work ethic to others. Ruth Bader Ginsburg was very much about woman empowerment and encouraging woman of all backgrounds to continue to work hard no matter the circumstances. Ruth going to law school, studying hard while also helping her husband and taking care of their child shows how women are able to accomplish so much more than they think.

    • Mark

      Wonderful readings of the both the novel and the film on RBG Brianna. I found your point about Pearl very intriquing: (As Pearl continues to talk about the sunshine with her mother she makes an inference that she would have to eventually carry on that scarlett letter once she gets older.) Are all women in American society somehow “disgraced by society” and its unfair codes and attitudes?

  7. Marjan Ahmed

    The line from chapter XVI caught my attention where little pearl tells her mom, “the sunshine does not love you. It runs away and hides itself, because it is afraid of something on your bosom. Now, see! There it is, playing, a good way off. Stand you here and let me run and catch it. I am but a child. It will not flee from me; for I wear nothing on my bosom yet!” Little did she know the reason behind the thing in her mother’s bosom is Pearl herself. That moment must have been hard for Hester since her own child is saying something does not love her, just like everyone else does not in the town. Also, Pearl talks about a story she knows where a black man puts letters in peoples bosom upon a sign with blood. I think pearl was thinking that how her mother got the Thing on her chest from the black man. Hester asks how peals heard the story, in reply Pearl mentions an Old lady who told her the story about how her mother got the letter in the bosom but Hester clarifies it’s a false made up story by the old lady. In chapter XVII we see that Hester and Arthur meet and Hester tells Arthur about her Husband. Arthur was angry at first considering he blamed himself for the pain of Hester for 7 years. Later on, Arthur forgives her which kind of proves that their love bond is really strong. Chillingworth intentionally commits the sin of seeking revenge against his fellow man even though he was supposed to be the good guy. One thing that hit me that Hester could have left Boston and remove the letter of shame. She could have led a simple and normal life, but she decided to stay there, facing all the hate and trouble. I guess if she left, the society would win, and she could never return to Boston. Instead she wanted to keep the letter, reminding her about the past. A part of her life’s struggle and it demonstrates her strength. Similar to Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who was one of the few females to study law at that time of History. It was awkward for her that others were giving her looks for being a female in the class but that did not stop her from achieving her goal. Almost everyone was against her studying the law but her husband. He was the only person stood by her side and encouraged her in perusing her drams career.

    • Mark

      Very subtle discussion Marjan of the novel (and film). Your analysis of Pearl as both naive and knowing is very perceptive.

  8. Amoy Russell-Jonas

    Feminism is not about making women stable. Ladies are now solid. It’s tied in with changing how the world sees that quality. The Scarlet Letter is a women’s activist novel that portrays a lady who believes that they should have similar rights as men and battle for equity. The word is frequently misjudged repeatedly by individuals who feel that women’s activists put men down to make ladies look better. It makes them have a helpless reputation from a man’s perspective. The puritan culture gave Hester an exceptionally dishonorable discipline: to remain on the framework for three hours and wear the speaking to infidelity on her chest for a fantastic remainder. Individuals would take a gander at the letter and judge the wrongdoing she submitted. Observe, verily, the lady of the red letter, and, of reality, there is also the resemblance of the red letter running along with close. Come, subsequently, and let us throw mud at them.
    Ruth Bader Ginsburg was complimentary towards both Justice Kavanaugh and Justice Gorsuch following their affirmations as credited. She said that it was his recruits who created another first, more female agent than male representatives at the country’s most high Court. Much was made of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s alleged last words. Offered her on-the-record thoughts on the sectarian idea of affirmations and court-pressing, the implied last proclamation on when she needed to purported ought to be seen with care. She had solid assessments about politicizing the Court.

  9. Lionel Desroses

    ven though Hester has been outlook by the village because she has now carried the scarlet letter, she did not let that discourage her or get in the way of raising her daughter pearl and kept on pushing on. In chapter XVI, “ the forest walk, show how Hester did not the scarlet letter ruin her child happiness by doing everything in her power to keep her daughter happy. At the beginning of the chapter, Hester and her daughter pearl were out in the wood, and pearl was saying how the sun did not love her mother. It keeps running away from her because of what was on bosom, yet Hester did not let that get in the way of her daughter playing in the sun. As she would tell pearl to go and catch the sun, and she would stand behind so Pearl could catch the sun since the sun did not love her. The text stated that “Mother,” said little Pearl, “the sunshine does not love you. It runs away and hides because it is afraid of something on your bosom. Now, see! There it is, playing, a good way[225] off. Stand you here, and let me run and catch it.”
    Furthermore, Hester did not let her daughter find out why she had the scarlet letter on her, so her daughter would not see her as a sinner and not ashamed of her. According to the text, “And why not, mother?” asked Pearl, stopping short, just at the beginning of her race. “Will not it come of its own accord when I am a woman grown? ”Runaway, child,” answered her mother.” as seen in this text, little pearl believes that the letter will come to its own once she had grown up to be a woman. Yet, it also looks like her mother is also trying to tell her indirectly to run away from that letter because it will take away the sun from her, which is her happiness. Hester and her daughter were playing. She met a man who is also seen as a disappointment to the village and laughed. Her meeting the man in the forest show that it does not matter where or what you have done. You will always find someone who is the same boat as you.

    • Mark

      Very intriguing discussion Lionel of the SL. You make an excellent point about how Hester “did not get discouraged in the way of raising her daughter and just kept on pushing on. ” She certainly, like RBG, is a strong female role model for Pearl. Your last point also speaks to the difficulty all women have living in a male-centric society (in a way aren’t they all marked eventually — you seem to be saying).

  10. Najeh Marcus

    Chapters 16 and 17 of “The Scarlet Letter” revealed a lot new things about Hester Prynne. Chapter 16 takes place at least 7 years later as Hester’s daughter is now 7. Chapter 17 was the bigger chapter out of two for because of all the information in it. I didn’t expect Arthur Dimmesdale, the minister would be pearls father and the man Hester committed adultery with. But knowing this helps me understands Hester’s reasons for being quiet and not outing him. One reason we can see is out of love. The second I think is that it would forever ruin his reputation in the church and in Boston. But it seems him not confessing his sin has affected him mentally or physically. I think Arthur always clutching at his chest/heart is symbolic to the pain he is feeling whether it is physical or emotional. It is also alluded that Chillingworth now knows about Hester and Arthur’s affair so he must have found out in an earlier chapter. Arthur seems scared of Chillingworth’s goal of vengeance towards him. It also sounded like Hester wants to reveal Chillingworth’s true identity. Another thing Hester suggests is that she, Arthur, and Pearl all go to Europe to escape Chillingworth and the opinions of the people in Massachusetts, but Arthur refused. From the reading “Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Lace Collar” I can tell Ruth Bader Ginsburg was an important person to many people. The one thing that made her stand out from other judges was the collars that she would wear. If I had to connect Ruth Bader Ginsburg to Hester Prynne it would be the different reasons they had for wearing their collars. For Ruth Bader Ginsburg the reason she wore a collar necklace was to feminize the male uniform. She even had different collar necklaces for things like majority opinions and dissent. Even though I don’t exactly had proof I think the scarlet letter she was forced to wear for seven years has changed her for better or for worse. In the second paragraph of chapter 18 the narrator states how the scarlet letter made strong and allowed her to go into territory that not even other women would go. So, if Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a strong woman and her use of collar necklaces made her stronger than I think the scarlet letter that Hester is forced to carry also made her stronger.

    • Mark

      Najeh,

      You do a fine job comparing Hester to Ruth Bader Ginsburg. I think you are completely right in analyzing Hester’s protection of the Reverend is done “out of love” . I also agree that in the end, wearing the scarlet “A” and staying strong made Hester (like RBG) even stronger. Nicely written.

  11. Ashley

    Before her passing, I did not have any knowledge on Judge Ruth, but when I saw “The Notorious RBG,” I began to learn all the things that she’s done for us women and overall sexism. Right away when the documentary started, there were audio recordings of men calling her all types of names such as vile, a disgrace, a witch, someone who no respect for the constitution and many more crazy words. On the contrary, she was everything but those degrading words, she was an icon for women equality, feminism and did not tolerate sexism. However, for her to get to the level that she was known for, she had to go through many obstacles and one of the main obstacles was her getting discriminated because she was a woman. Around those times, the ideal woman was one that had to stay home and do all the duties that were stereotypical at the time for women to do, so of course when she tried to get into that law firm, no one took her seriously. One of the many cases that stood out to me was the Stephen Weisenfeld case, because she had a good strategy to show that “gender-bases discrimination hurts everyone.” Of course, there were plenty other cases that could be used as an example for what she has done when it comes to equality, but for some reason I feel like this is what gender equality is all about, its’s not that women should be superior to men, it’s the moral fact that men and women should be treated the same, and should be given the same opportunities that the other gender has. Overall, I can agree that she’s an icon for women’s rights, feminism and equality for genders, she has changed the game for this generation and for the rest to come and here legacy will continue.

    • Mark

      Ashley,
      I’m glad you clearly learned so much watching this amazing documentary on RBG. Your lines on her are very eloquent and spot on: “On the contrary, she was anything but those degrading words; she was an icon for women’s equality and feminism, who did not tolerate sexism.” How true!

  12. Amoy Russell-Jonas

    Feminism is not about making women stable. Ladies are now solid. It is tied in with changing how the world sees that quality. This will is confirmed in Hester’s story in The Scarlet Letter and Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
    The Scarlet Letter is a women’s activist novel that portrays a lady who believes that they should have similar rights as men and battle for equity. The word is frequently misjudged repeatedly by individuals who feel that women’s activists put men down to make ladies look better. It makes them have a helpless reputation from a man’s perspective. The puritan culture gave Hester an exceptionally dishonorable discipline: to remain on the framework for three hours and wear the speaking to infidelity on her chest for a fantastic remainder. Individuals would take a look at the letter and judge the wrongdoing she submitted. Observe, verily, the lady of the red letter, and, of reality, there is also the resemblance of the red letter running along with close. Come, subsequently, and let us throw mud at them!
    Ruth Bader Ginsburg was complimentary towards both Justice Kavanaugh and Justice Gorsuch following their affirmations as credited. She said that his recruits created another first, more female agent than male representatives at the country’s most high Court. Much was made of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s alleged last words. Offered her on-the-record thoughts on the sectarian idea of affirmations and court-pressing, the implied last proclamation on when she needed to purported ought to be seen with care. She had solid assessments about politicizing the Court.

    • Mark

      Amoy,

      You do a good job here comparing Hester Prynne to Ruth Bader Ginsburg as strong feminists. It would be interesting to work this comparison out a bit more for your first essay.

      Nicely done.

  13. Afshan S (Lil B)

    The 1995 movie version of The Scarlet Letter was weird and entertaining, and is very loosely based on the book. Being that it’s a Hollywood movie with A-list actors like Demi Moore, Robert Duvall, and Gary Oldman, it needed to have sex scenes, and very long ones at that, I’m assuming to get more people to pay to see the movie. While I did appreciate the screenwriter’s desire to fill in the gaps to show more details of Hester and Dimmesdale’s relationship, I did not really think it was necessary portray the slave Mituba so badly. Not only did they make her “mute,” and not have any speaking roles, but they showed her watching over Hester and Dimmesdale making love, or at least sexualizing her in a weird way. On top of that, they showed her being tortured and had her killed in the movie, which didn’t seem necessary to advance the story at all. There were no other black people in the movie, perpetuating this stereotype that black people get killed off in movies where the cast is mostly white. Other than that, the movie was entertaining with how they made Hester to be a very strong, learned, and well-read feminist figure who is constantly pushing back against the society that the puritans have set up. I think the push for Hester to be such a strong feminist in this 1995 version of the movie came at a time where women were gaining momentum towards equality for women in American society, especially after Ruth Bader Ginsberg becomes the second woman to be a supreme court justice in 1993. The women act a little differently than they do in the book, constantly berating Hester and calling her a “slut,” and the scarlet letter on her chest doesn’t change meaning overtime like it does in the book. The acting was well done, too. Robert Duvall, Demi Moore, and Gary Oldman really carried this film in a way I didn’t think was possible for a movie made in the 90s. I appreciated the happy ending of the movie, where the reverend, Hester, and Pearl run away to live happily ever after, it’s a nice contrast to what happens in the book.

    Chapter XVII of The Scarlet Letter reveals that Dimmesdale is the father of Pearl, which is something that he finds out way earlier in the movie version, and that Chillingworth is actually Hester’s husband. We learn how spiritually and mentally tortured Dimmesdale became over the past seven years, the first thing he asks Hester is “Have you found peace?” and Hester’s asking him the same made him reveal that he’s found “nothing but despair!” Dimmesdale seems to have been suffering on his own without Hester, especially with the arrival of Chillingworth into his life, he feels as though he doesn’t “have the strength or the courage to venture into the wide, strange, difficult world alone!” The movie and book version of Dimmesdale seem to be very similar, yet Dimmesdale doesn’t seem to be as spiritually tortured in the movie.

    • Mark

      Very thoughtful response to both the film and the text Afshan. You bring up a very important failing of the film (the depiction of Tituba) which reflects, I believe, the year it was filmed (1990s), before attention was really being given to this topic in Hollywood. And yes it’s very much a HOLLYWOOD film but well-acted and produced as you discuss. The happy ending is also very Hollywood but of course the novel — leaving Hester to return to the community by herself to continue her work to “redeem” it — is far more philosophical and feminist even. Excellent pick-ups!

  14. chris castellon

    After watching the film “RBG” I learned that she was stronger than she looked because of her educational history and her determination for setting an example for all women that they can no longer have to be oppressed for being a women. What also made her strong “and” determined is studying law and at the same time supporting her family. Ginsburg had some struggles in her life because of her gender, most men believed that a women’s main role in life is to just stay home all day cook, clean and be at everyman’s beckn call. Ginsburg’s will was stronger however so she can be an example for every women who were oppressed and to eliminate sexism most of all. My favorite statement she quoted during a case was when she said “gender bases discrimination hurts everyone”. Ginsburg studied law to become a lawyer I have forgotten to mention and has successfully won cases that involves equality. In Ginsburg’s book men and women are equal and should be treated equal because if a man can be a top earner or a fighter than so can a women if she had confidence and determination.

    • Mark

      Thanks for your thoughtful response Chris. Your final point is particularly well-said:
      For Ginsburg “men and women are equal and should be treated equal because if a man can be a top earner or a fighter than so can a women if she has the confidence and determination.”

  15. Daniela Martinez

    Response to The Scarlet Letter (Film)

    “Uncanny” was the word used to describe Hester Pryne in the colony. Hester Prynne arrived in the New World, anticipating a warm welcome from the Puritans. However, she will not expect them to conspire against her in the future. During the movie, I was overwhelmed by how different I envisioned the movie’s scenery than the novel. Moreover, I was amazed at how well Demi Moore interpreted being an independent woman against the colony’s society. The actress truly portrayed the bravery and resilience of Hester Prynne when the minister and the officials condemned her for her sin. Unfortunately, Hester Prynne lived in a very ancient time and got judged by the Christian religion’s strong prejudices. As once I mentioned before, religion used to be and still be a “double-edged weapon.” If the Church were not as vital as today, Hester would not have been judged.

    In the present day, the feminist movement would consider Hester Prynne as a symbol of woman empowerment. She faced constant judgments from the town because she was not “following” the rules of being controlled by a man. Even though Hester knew that she was married, she did not accept waiting for her husband to independently get home and horse. Even when she was told not to do labor that was only for men, she eventually demonstrated that she could do it. No man in her life was necessary for Hester, even after she met the minister and fell in love with him.

    Response to The Notorious RBG (A Documentary on the Life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg)

    On the other hand, when we talk about a pop icon in these days that have fought for both sexes’ equality, we think of “Notorious RBG.” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg marked a difference since she attended Harvard not for marriage but to become successful. I recognized that her mother was Ruth’s inspiration to be the way she told her to be: “Be a lady” and “Be independent.” The documentary explained what her mother meant with “Be a lady,” which was “don’t allow yourself to be overcome by useless emotions like anger.” That description fitted the personality of Justice Ruth used to indicate to the people. Moreover, what her mother meant to say about “Be independent” was to “be able to fend yourself.”

    It was not weird that what Ruth’s mother stated once shaped the persona of the “Notorious RBG.” During the whole documentary, I did not only saw a tiny, humble woman. I saw a figure who wanted to apply equal protection for women and men in the 70s. Later, she included other minorities, such as the LGBTQ+ community and pro-abortion advocates. It was sad how an amazing woman like her had to leave this world and leave a great legacy behind American society. However, it is incredible the influence justice Ruth held while still alive among various races, religions, and sexes. Even young people admired her for fighting equal protection for both sexes in a difficult period for women to defend themselves.

    The documentary was indeed a piece of a well-done compilation of her life. It was good to watch and knowledge a person who lived to seek the Constitution’s reform to be equal for everyone. Alas, Supreme Court of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

  16. Galileo D

    Chapter XVII: The Pastor and the Parishioner
    There are several insights that can be drawn from this chapter. Hester has been holding a secret from Dimmesdale. Hester reveals that Chillingworth is her husband. The news are heartbreaking to Dimmesdale. However, Hester is now relieved. While reading the section, it is clear that at times it is important to avoid living in bondage of secrecy and reveal everything to create an environment of trust. Hester is eventually forgiven. Furthermore, Dimmesdale concludes that Chillingworth is a worse sinner and so he should not be granted much attention. By living in lies and deception, the two lovers were denying each other a chance to fully enjoy their union. The power of honesty therefore presents strongly in the story. One may be depressed by secrets that should be revealed to provoke the affected person to forgive. Dimmesdale forgives Hester. The lesson from his response is that it is never too late to forgive. Forgiving opens a new page to develop trust between two friends, or lovers. It is interesting how easily Dimmesdale forgives and they plan to run away to Europe to live a happy life.
    RBG Documentary
    The RBG documentary focuses on the career and life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Ginsburg’s name comes up when exploring the position of women in the United States and the great strides they have made to assert themselves in the U.S. educational and political scenes. As the second female associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, Ginsburg’s story is really inspiring. After watching the film, I realized how important it is to defy the structures that hold one down in the society. It is impossible to succeed without facing various challenges. Ginsburg was brought in a period when women were struggling to assert themselves in different positions of the U.S. society. It is interesting that she succeeded and set the pace to millions of girls who are struggling to break off from social and structural barriers that hinder them from exploring their full potential. Her story is interesting and inspiring.

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