11 thoughts on “Reflection

  1. Profile photo of Maria DiminoMaria Dimino

    This document is very informative I guess I never really thought about this so in depth. When using self reflection in my courses I usually have the students write a self reflecting journal about their clinic experience and discuss their strengths and weaknesses of the session. In addition, I ask them to reflect on their experience and discuss how they could have improved on the session.

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    1. Profile photo of Prof. Karen GoodladProf. Karen Goodlad Post author

      I like asking different questions each week. Sometimes I ask student to “look back at your journal from 5 weeks ago. How has your understanding of the subject changed?” They seem to like to see the growth.

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  2. Profile photo of Alejandro CantagalloAlejandro Cantagallo

    Because I primarily teach culinary classes, the progression and reflection of a students progress is evident in a way that It may not be in other types of classes, but I do ask them a question on their first day and have them write down the response, on the last day of instruction I ask them to answer it again and share with the group. the question is “Why are you in the Department of Hospitality Management and what do you plan on doing with your education here?” Since the class is so outside of what most students are used to, typically they show a big variance from where they started.

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    1. Profile photo of Prof. Karen GoodladProf. Karen Goodlad Post author

      I like the dual reflection. I did something similar when I taught Dining Room Operation. We did reflect weekly so on week 10 I asked them to look at their reflection on week 4. They were often amazed at how much they have learned.

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  3. Thalia Warner

    Questions are powerful. Every semester I ask 3 questions on week one:
    1)why hospitality?
    2) what do you want to do when you graduate?
    3) what’s one goal you’d like to accomplish by the end of June 2016. (This does not have to be related to school)
    This is the first semester I followed the last question with a prompt: ‘write down one step you’ll have to take in order to accomplish that goal’. I asked them to hold on to it and we’ll revisit it at the week 15. (Though I think I may have them revisit it midway through the semester.)
    I think verbalizIng and writing down the answers to these questions helps the students to be more intentional in doing what’s necessary to be successful in their studies and careers.

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    1. Profile photo of Prof. Karen GoodladProf. Karen Goodlad Post author

      First semester students can gain a lot from this type of questioning.

      You gave me and idea! I wonder what would be the response if students were asked to write a question to themselves which will be answered 15 weeks from now. I may just do that.

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    2. Profile photo of mvictoriaspmvictoriasp

      I usually ask students the first day of class what are their plans after they graduate (same question as your question 2). But my question is not as open-ended; I add whether they are thinking of attending graduate school. Students have to write down their answers as part of a student profile, not graded.
      Based on my teaching experience, the question regarding why students are taking a specific class works better when is not a survey-type of course like Introduction to American Government. Every semester most of the students in this introductory course just reply that they are taking the course because it is required. The question works better in my upper level courses which reflect better the student choices.
      I have not asked the third question but it seems useful to improve rapport with students. In an online course that I teach I ask students to introduce themselves to the rest of the class, and to me, and many students add non academic goals and interests to their introductions.

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  4. Profile photo of Alyssa Dana AdomaitisAlyssa Dana Adomaitis

    I love this reflection exercise. I think reflection is great way for students and faculty to see how far one has come in the class as a class. I will be using this as an assessment tool in my courses. Thank you.
    Alyssa

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  5. Profile photo of Alyssa Dana AdomaitisAlyssa Dana Adomaitis

    Engaging students to reflect upon themselves is excellent..I love this idea as most students enjoy talking about themselves…….we could also ask students to reflect upon their social media page and what does it communicate about them? I could ask students to reflect upon their dress as well and ask what they intended to communicate by reflecting upon their respective dress for the day?

    Alyssa

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  6. Profile photo of Stefan SStefan S

    Backward-looking kind of questions are the core of history! Well, not only those, but when wanting to bring to our level the issues we’re reading about, inward-looking questions make sense, and make the issue meaningful to the reader.
    I read that my group members ask their students about their future plans (forward-looking). I make the point of doing that as well, but always about half way through the course, when students are more likely to get bogged down and loose compass as to why they are in college/what their initial desire was in coming here, and give my examples and those of others to point to how to – get there! At this point both inward and outward-looking questions/observation serves the purpose of reminding one of larger picture, greater need, and the personal drive to make the connections through one’s whole life.

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