Spring 2019

Spring 2019 Literature Courses

Students, scroll down to check out the English Department’s amazing line-up of Spring 2019 literature courses. Registration is opening soon, so make sure to get a seat in the class of your choice by registering as soon as you can, on CUNYfirst.

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Below is some additional information about some of our special, themed Literature Courses.

 

ENG 2000 (Perspectives in Literature): The Uses of Anger: Resistance and Rage in Literature

  • Professor Laura Westengard
  • ENG 2000-D528 (Perspectives in Literature)
  • Tuesday/Thursday 11:30am-12:45pm
  • Individual and Society (Flexible Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive Course
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1101
  • Course Description
    • In this class, we will explore texts and films by people who resist oppression by channeling their anger into writing and activism. We will watch films and read a range of texts (short stories, novels, essays) and use them as models for using our own anger as a source of creativity and action.

ENG 2002 (Introduction to Literature II: Drama): Reading Drama: Social Issues in American Drama, World War II to the Present (2 sections)

  • Professor Annette Saddik
    • ENG 2002-D546 (Introduction to Literature II: Drama)
      • Tuesday/Thursday 2:30-3:45pm
    • ENG 2002-D542 (Introduction to Literature II: Drama)
      • Tuesday/Thursday 4:00-5:15pm
  • Creative Expression (Flexible Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive Course
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1101
  • Course Description
    • This course will introduce students to the exploration of relevant social, political, and economic issues in American drama from World War II to the present.  We will discuss how drama as a genre has interpreted historical and political issues in America to represent their social and personal impact.  Historical events such as the changes associated with industrial capitalism during the 1940s, the Communist “witch hunts” of Joseph McCarthy and HUAC, the social revolutions surrounding race during the 1960s, the AIDS crisis of the 1980s and 1990s, the Great Recession of 2008, and current immigration policies will be examined through plays that address their effects on individual identity, as well as on social and interpersonal relationships.

ENG 2100 (Introduction to Literature: Fiction): Exploring the Human: the Human Condition and the Self in Society

  • Professor Leigh Gold
  • ENG 2000-D536 (Introduction to Literature: Fiction)
  • Monday/Wednesday 1:00-2:15pm
  • Creative Expression (Flexible Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive Course
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1101
  • Course Description

    In English 2001, Intro to Fiction, Section D536, we will be reading Mary Shelley’s famous novel Frankenstein as well as Philip K Dick’s novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, the novel that inspired the film “Blade Runner.” Through these two novels as well as other shorter readings, we will think about what it means to be human, what it means to live in relationship to others, and how each one of us confronts our own sense of identity and belonging. We will consider how the relationships that we have with one another fundamentally impact our sense of identity. We will also explore how these novels relate to many academic disciplines, thinking about interconnections between various academic areas and experiences. We will be asked to look at how our current society can be better understood by reading works of fiction, leading us to ask more questions about how we can change the world around us.

ENG 2150: Introduction to Women Writers

  • Professor Megan Behrent
  • ENG 2150-D548 (Introduction to Women Writers)
  • Tuesday/Thursday 11:30am-12:45pm
  • Individual and Society (Flexible Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive Course, Gender & Sexuality Studies Course
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1101
  • Course Description
    • This survey course is designed to introduce both men and women to the writings of selected women writers, through readings by both major authors and less well-known writers. Issues of form, structure and genre will be discussed. Students will read, analyze and discuss themes raised by women writers. A variety of genres will be discussed including essays, short stories and poems, and a novel will be explored. Women writers from the United States, Great Britain, and the Caribbean may be included.

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ENG 2170 ID: Introduction to Studies in Maleness and Manhood

  • Professor Julian Williams
  • ENG 2170ID-E246 (Interdisciplinary Course; Introduction to Studies in Maleness and Manhood)
  • Wednesday 6:00-8:30pm
  • Creative Expression (Flexible Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive Course, Interdisciplinary Course, Gender & Sexuality Studies Course
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1101
  • Course Description
    • This class will examine the world’s history of male dominance and how, over time, man’s position of power has diminished. To prove this, we will look at various arenas where men have always excelled—from socialized brutality to organized warfare, the home structure to Wall Street—in an attempt to determine how males came to power and where they have lost their footing. We will also discuss how the suffrage movement, feminism, the sexual revolution, harassment laws, and advancements in education have led to women becoming more independent and, thereby, to what extent these movements have impacted the concept of male superiority. Together we will ask and answer, “As women rise, must men fall?” Moreover, we will investigate what some cultures are doing to ensure that patriarchy continues to flourish.

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ENG 2190: Expressions of Identity: Representations of Gender and Space in Literature

  • Professor Caroline Hellman
  • ENG 2190-D554 (Expressions of Identity: Representations of Gender and Space in Literature)
  • Tuesday/Thursday 10:00-11:15am
  • U.S. Experience in its Diversity (Flexible Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive Course, Gender & Sexuality Studies Course
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1101
  • Course Description
    • This course fulfills the writing intensive requirement. Investigate how gender and space interact in our world, in personal, familial, communal, digital, local, national, and global ways, in 19th-21st-century American literature, film, and visual art. All are welcome. Questions? Email chellman@citytech.cuny.edu

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ENG 2400: Films From Literature (3 sections)

  • Professor: Staff (TBD)
    • ENG 2400-D563 (Films from Literature)
    • Friday 11:30am-2:00pm
  • Professor Mark Noonan
    • ENG 2400-D564 (Films from Literature)
    • Thursday 2:30-5:00pm
  • Professor George Guida
    • ENG 2400-HD67 (Hybrid Section; Films from Literature)
    • OpenLab + (in-person) Wednesday 4:00-5:15pm
    • *See course description & video trailer for this section below (under ENG 2400 poster)
  • Creative Expression (Flexible Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive Course
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1101
  • Course Description
    • This course will allow students to examine the relationship between films and their literary sources. Through classroom discussions and out-of-class assignments, students will analyze classic and contemporary literary texts and their cinematic versions. Students will examine the relationship between film and literature, with specific focus on the techniques used in fiction, drama and film, and the influences of censorship and society. Students will focus on the similarities and differences of literary works adapted into films.

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* Course Description & Video Trailer for Professor Guida’s section of the course (ENG 2400-HD67)

Films from Literature (ENG 2400) will allow students to examine the relationship between films and their literary sources. Through classroom discussions and out-of-class assignments, students will analyze classic and contemporary literary texts and their film adaptations. Students will examine the relationship between film and literature, with specific focus on the techniques used in fiction, drama and film, as well as the social context of literary and cinematic storytelling.

ENG 2420: Science Fiction (2 sections)

  • Professor Lucas Kwong
    • ENG 2420-D570 (Science Fiction)
    • Monday/Wednesday 2:30-3:45pm
  • Professor Jill Belli
    • ENG 2420-HD74 (Hybrid Section; Science Fiction)
    • (mixture of online and in-person) Tuesday/Thursday 10:00-11:15am
  • Individual and Society (Flexible Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive Course
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1101
  • Course Description
    • Study of science fiction literature and film, with attention to cultural implications of the genre. Explores the questions science and technology raise about past, present, and future societies. Projects, presentations, and exams based on readings.

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ENG 3402 (Topics in Literature): The Graphic Novel

  • Professor Rebecca Mazumdar
  • ENG 3402-D608 (Topics in Literature)
  • Tuesday / Thursday 2:30-3:45pm
  • Creative Expression (Flexible Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive Course, Capstone Course for LAA and LAS degrees
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1121 or any 2000-level literature (AFR, ENG LATS)
  • Course Description
    • In this exciting class, you’ll learn about the history of comic books and graphic novels, as well as the ways the genre has revolutionized contemporary literature. Where else will you find a class that encourages you to discuss superheroes, fantasy, and global politics… perhaps all in the same conversation?

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ENG 3403 (One Major Writer): Warrior Poet: The Revolutionary Life, Poetry, & Politics of Audre Lorde

  • Professor Megan Behrent
  • ENG 3403-D610 (One Major Writer)
  • Tuesday / Thursday 2:30-3:45pm
  • Individual and Society (Flexible Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive Course, Capstone Course for LAA and LAS degrees
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1121 or any 2000-level literature (AFR, ENG, LATS)
  • Course Description
    • Audre Lorde is one of the most important writers, thinkers and activists of the 20th Century. As an activist and writer, Lorde dedicated her life and work to the struggle against racism, sexism, homophobia, class inequality, and imperialism. This course will explore Lorde’s poetry and prose so as to understand her artistic and political legacy and the resonance of her work in the current political moment. Throughout the course, we will contextualize Lorde’s work vis-à-vis the political movements of which she was a part, reading her work in conversation with other writers in feminist movements, Black Power & civil rights movements, socialist thinkers, and anti-racist activists internationally. In reading Lorde’s work, this class will also engage with broader political debates about the intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality.

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ENG 3404: The Literature of Illness and Care

  • Professor Ellen Falvey
  • ENG 3404-HD12 (Hybrid Section; The Literature of Illness and Care)
  • Online + (in-person) Thursday 2:30-3:45pm
  • Individual and Society (Flexible Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive Course, Capstone Course for LAA and LAS degrees
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1121 or any 2000-level literature (AFR, ENG, LATS)
  • Course Description
    • ARE YOU INTERESTED IN MEDICINE? Do you love reading? This class will be an in-depth study of the literature of illness and care through reading and writing about memoirs, fiction, essays and poetry.

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ENG 3407: Gothic Literature and Visual Culture

  • Professor Laura Westengard
  • ENG 3407-D613 (Gothic Literature and Visual Culture)
  • Tuesday/Thursday 2:30-3:45pm
  • Creative Expression (Flexible Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive Course, Capstone Course for LAA and LAS degrees
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1121 or any 2000-level literature (AFR, ENG, LATS)
  • Course Description
    • Terror, Suspense, Mystery, Horror, and Monsters! Students critically read, analyze, and write about the popular genre of the Gothic. As represented in both literary and visual terms, in both Europe and the United States beginning in the late-18th century to today. Key concepts include horror, haunting, madness, and monsters.

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