Spring 2018

Students, scroll down to check out the English Department’s amazing line-up of Spring 2018 literature courses. Registration is open, so make sure to get a seat in the class of your choice by registering now, on CUNYfirst!

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*Below is some additional information about some of our special, themed Literature Courses.

Introduction to Studies in Maleness and Manhood

  • Professor Julian Williams
  • ENG 2170ID-E246
  • Wednesday 6:00-8:30pm
  • Interdisciplinary Course, Creative Expression (Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1101
  • Course Description
    • This class will examine the world’s history of male dominance and how, over time, man’s position of power has diminished. To prove this, we will look at various arenas where men have always excelled—from socialized brutality to organized warfare, the home structure to Wall Street—in an attempt to determine how males came to power and where they have lost their footing. We will also discuss how the suffrage movement, feminism, the sexual revolution, harassment laws, and advancements in education have led to women becoming more independent and, thereby, to what extent these movements have impacted the concept of male superiority. Together we will ask and answer, “As women rise, must men fall?” Moreover, we will investigate what some cultures are doing to ensure that patriarchy continues to flourish.

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Introduction to Women Writers

  • Professor Monique Ferrell
  • ENG 2150-D548
  • Tuesday/Thursday 11:30am-12:45pm
  • Individual & Society (Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1101
  • Course Description
    • This survey course is designed to introduce both men and women to the writings of selected women writers, through readings by both major authors and less well-known writers. Issues of form, structure and genre will be discussed. Students will read, analyze and discuss themes raised by women writers. A variety of genres will be discussed including essays, short stories and poems, and a novel will be explored. Women writers from the United States, Great Britain, and the Caribbean may be included.

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Science Fiction (two sections offered: choose either one!)

  • Individual & Society (Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1101
  • Course Description
    • Study of science ction literature and lm, with attention to cultural implications of the genre. Explores the questions science and technology raise about past, present, and future societies. Projects, presentations, and exams based on readings.

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Selling Happiness: The Promises & Problems of Self-Help Literature

  • Professor Jill Belli
  • ENG 3402-D607 (Topics in Literature)
  • Tuesday/Thursday 2:30-3:45pm
  • Individual & Society (Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive, Capstone Course
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1121 or any 2000-level literature (ENG, AFR, PRS)
  • Course Description
    • Do you dream of having more happiness, success, or love? Of getting better grades, jobs, relationships, or sleep? If so, you are not alone! Countless people want more from their lives and from others, and they turn to self-help to make their dreams reality. Some doctors even prescribe self-help books for their patients! What is this obsession with self-help? What does it offer us? Why do we keep reading it?This course is an introduction to “the American love affair with self-help” through its literature, industry, benefits, and critiques. Though self-help is often dismissed as providing low-brow, quack remedies for the masses, this course considers it in earnest, exploring what makes the genre so compelling, and why and how self-help matters, to individuals and societies. Students will read self-help texts; try their techniques; reflect on their methods, effectiveness, promises, and problems; and create their own self-help texts for others.
  • Note from Professor Belli: I’m happy to answer any questions about the course, so email me if you want more info.! jbelli@citytech.cuny.edu (you can also visit the course–currently under construction–on the OpenLab)

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Evolution of a Spy: John Le Carré George Smiley

  • Professor Aaron Barlow
  • ENG 3403-D609 (One Major Writer)
  • Tuesday/Thursday 10:00-11:15am
  • Individual & Society (Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive, Capstone Course
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1121 or any 2000-level literature (ENG, AFR, PRS)
  • Course Description
    • John Le Carré’s most famous character, the spy-master George Smiley, burst into fame with Le Carré’s third novel, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold. In this course, students investigate the culture of the Cold War that serves as the backdrop to the Smiley novels as well as Smiley’s growth as a character that came about as Le Carrédeveloped as a ‘serious’ writer. Students will also investigate the complex weave of intelligence agencies of the USSR, Great Britain and the United States replete with agents and counter-agents that serves as a backdrop to the Smiley novels.

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Gothic Literature and Visual Culture

  • Professor Sean Scanlan
  • ENG 3403-D612
  • Tuesday/Thursday 11:30am-12:45pm
  • Creative Expression (Common Core Requirement), Writing Intensive, Capstone Course
  • Prerequisite of ENG 1121 or any 2000-level literature (ENG, AFR, PRS)
  • Course Description
    • Terror, Suspense, Mystery, Horror, and Monsters!
      Students critically read, analyze, and write about the popular genre of the Gothic. As represented in both literary and visual terms, in both Europe and the United States beginning in the late-18th century to today. Key concepts include horror, haunting, madness, and monsters.

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