LNG1100-OL51-SU2020

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  • #63374

    Cross-cultural communication and non-verbal behavior

    Task 1:
    – Listen to the Audio recordings 1 and 2. (not the Paper 1 recording. that is for later on).

    – Open the Power Point and review it as you are re-listening to Audio 1 and 2.

    Then, do the Discussion Board Questions.

    Introduction Questions (BY 5 P.M. TODAY) and Two Peer Responses (by 10 a.m. Saturday).

    YOU NEED TO POST YOUR OWN RESPONSE AND CHOOSE TWO PEER RESPONSES TO REACT TO. MAKE SURE YOUR RESPONSE IS ENGAGING.

    1. Think about your own interaction with others: do you tend to use gestures (hand movement) or eyebrow movement a lot? Are you aware of others using gestures?
    2. Think of some cross-cultural gesture use: are they all the same? Have you met people from other cultures who use the same gesture but with a different meaning?

    #63377

    KevinMZ
    Participant

    HI KEVIN, YES, WE ALL USE GESTURES. SOME CULTURES ARE MUCH MORE GESTURE-ORIENTED, BUT SOME ARE LESS. IN THE UK WHERE I GREW UP, YOU ARE NOT SUPPOSED TO MOVE YOUR HANDS TOO MUCH. BUT AS A TEACHER, I TEND TO GESTURE A LOT! NOW THAT YOU KNOW ABOUT NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION YOU MAY START TO NOTICE CROSS-CULTURAL DIFFERENCES MUCH MORE!

    When I interact with others, sometimes I use hand gestures. I am aware of using gestures and use them for the listener to understand what I am saying, whether it is to give a demonstration or emphasize a statement. I sometimes use the eyebrow movements to indicate I am surprised for something that happened or what is said.
    Some gestures are not the same, such as using the peace sigh with two fingers mean “peace” in American culture. Although the peach sign gesture has a bad meaning in other culture. There is also the gesture of looking into someone’s eyes upon engaging in a conversation with someone to show that the person is understanding the conversation. In Asian culture this gesture had a different meaning as if the person is not listening, the Asian cultures prefer the person’s eyes looking downwards to show you are understanding the conversation. I have not met people from other cultures who use the same gesture, but with different meanings.

    #63380

    Jess
    Participant

    HI JESS! I ENJOYED READING YOUR NUMBER 2! GREAT OBSERVATION. IT IS VERY TRUE. SO WHAT YOU ARE SAYING: CULTURES ARE SO POWERFUL. IMAGINE THE ENTIRE NATION USES THE SAME HEAD MOVEMENT. IT IS ASTONISHING. WE LEARN THINGS FROM CRADLE AND NEVER REALLY CAN CHANGE THEM.

    1. When I speak to others I sometimes use hand gestures but come to think of it I’m not aware when I am doing it. I do use eyebrow gestures and the reason I know I do is because people have pointed out how high I can raise my eye brow. When someone is speaking to me I do notice when they are speaking with their hands and I notice facial movement.

    2. Working in a prominent Indian neighborhood I do notice that the Indian culture has many different facial movements. For example when answering No to a question I have noticed that a lot of my patients who are Indian do kind of a head bob like they are moving their head in a motion that looks like yes but they are in fact replying no. I don’t believe ALL Indian people make this head movement but I did notice that each one that I have met has. I have actually never met anyone from another culture that does this type of facial/head movement .

    #63381

    Jess
    Participant

    HI KEVIN: I AGREE WITH JESS! I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT THE PEACE SIGN. BUT MY STUDENTS TOLD ME ABOUT THE SIGN ITALIANS USE TO SAY: GREAT FOOD. IT IS NOT A POLITE SING IN MANY LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES. IS THAT TRUE?

    Hi Kevin,
    I found it interesting that people from other cultures might take the peace sign as defensive gesture, I had no idea. I also liked what you added about Asian culture I never knew that looking down while someone is speaking to you means you are understanding the conversation ! Thanks for the new information I can use it because I see a very diverse culture of patients where I work!

    #63386

    Chanell Perez
    Participant

    YES, MANY PEOPLE SEEM TO ‘TALK WITH THEIR HANDS’.

    IT IS SUCH A GOOD WAY TO DESCRIBE NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION. THIS INFORMATION ABOUT ALBANIAN NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION IS NEW TO ME. I HAVE HAD MANY ALBANIAN STUDENTS!

    I usually use my hands a lot when talking and my face is very expressive. It is very hard for me to keep a straight (serious face). I tend to smile even when I am upset. I feel people have a had time taking me seriously. I wide open my eyes if I am impressed or I make them small if I am pleasant about something. I also tend to move my sight away if I dislike something. Someone once told me that I talk with my hands, I guessed I use them a lot.

    When I arrived to the USA, I used to go to a school for English classes. There were people from different nationalities. One of my Albanian classmates explained me that in her country, when people wants to say “no” non-verbally, they settle the head the way we say yes in the west; and they say “yes” the way we say “no” nodding our head.

    #63387

    jancelee
    Participant

    HI JANCEE! YES, THIS IS INTERESTING HOW PEOPLE MAKE ASSUMPTIONS JUST BASED ON VOICE PITCH AND HAND MOVEMENT, RIGHT? THIS IS PRETTY WELL KNOWN ABOUT INDIAN CULTURE. VERY INTERESTING.

    I found these articles very interesting, I’ve always noticed that I use hand gestures when I speak. So much so that I’ve tried to control it for presentations at work. I’ve noticed that my family and in my culture, we all pretty much do the same. We also tend to be a high toned invoice. If someone that’s not familiar with my culture was to look at me from afar while I spoke to someone they might think that I am in an argument or in a confrontations conversation due to my hand gesture. But if I observe this from my own culture I would find it as something normal.
    When I worked in a hotel in Manhattan, years back I tried to explain something to a guest that came from India. As I was explaining the situation the guest from India kept bubbling his head. I wasn’t sure why he bubbling his head but I was also getting frustrated. I stepped to the back office and expressed to someone how I was trying to explain something to the guest but he was not trying to hear it. My coworker expressed that the bobbling of his head of the head was something that was part of their culture and didn’t actually mean that he was being difficult. That was interesting for me to learn.

    #63388

    jancelee
    Participant

    Hi KevinMZ, its very interesting because I caught my self doing the same. with the facial expressions and hand gestures. I actually took a public speaking class and had someone record me. I then reviewed my recording and tried to minimize the hand gestures and face expressions. It was something that it’s naturally in my culture so trying to control it for when I do presentations.

    LIKE THE WAY YOU BOTH RESPONDED! JANCE SOUNDS LIKE THE PUBLIC SPEAKING CLASS WAS USEFUL! I THINK RECORDING ONESELF IS ALWAYS A GOOD WAY TO SEE WHAT GESTURES YOU ARE MAKING!

    #63389

    jancelee
    Participant

    Hi Jess,
    I found my self in a similar situation. I also don’t think that all Indians do the same bubbling as the head. I’ve noticed that the younger generation doesn’t do that but the older generation does.

    #63390

    Chanell Perez
    Participant

    Hi Jess,

    I also worked with an predominant Indian and Bangladesh culture. I have realized that they nod their heads when talking about themselves or narrating something. I haven’t been able to noticed about the motion of their heads when they are saying yes or no. I feel that everybody shared similar non-verbal expression, even when they are utilized under different circumstances.

    #63391

    Chanell Perez
    Participant

    Hi Kevin,

    I didn’t know that the peace sign was actually something bad in other cultures. I usually use it when I am leaving (only with close friends). I have known about the looking straight to the eyes versus looking down to show respect and transmit a feeling of attention to what the other person is saying. Sometimes I do that if I am talking to someone close to me. However, when I am talking to someone not related to me, I tried to keep a straight staring to show respect and that I am paying attention to what they are saying.

    #63392

    KevinMZ
    Participant

    Peer Responses:

    Chanell,
    That is an interesting experience at your school for English. Learning the English is very important as it is the most popular language in the world! I’ve heard of that gesture before, where USA nod gestures are the exact opposite in another country. When traveling to your classmates country, try not to mix up the nodding gestures for proper communication!

    Jancelee,
    I would expect hotel employees at the front desk encountering many people from all over the world, especially if it is in a well-known hotel like Marriott. Which would mean front desk employees would see and hear various of language, accents, dialects, and gestures. That is a very cool experience and people can learn a lot of cultures from it.

    #63395

    Jada
    Participant

    HI JADA, THANKS FOR POSTING! APOLOGY ACCEPTED!
    YES, THE EYE CONTACT IS SO CENTRAL TO WESTERN CULTURE AND YET IT IS TOTALLY OPPOSITE INTHE FAR EAST! MANY PEOPLE IN THE USA MISUNDERSTAND IT. I HAVE PERSONALLY RECEIVED EMAILS FROM TEACHERS IN OTHER SUBJECTS COMPLAINING ABOUT THIS!

    THE GOOD THING IS: WE CAN LEARN ABOUT OTHERS AND ACCEPT THE DIFFERENCES!

    1. I use my hands a lot when I talk but it’s something I’m working on not doing because it can be deemed unprofessional in a work environment. I don’t notice when I use them in a certain way but I know I move them around a lot in like circular motions or side to side all the time. I do notice when other people use it because when my eyes tend to move around a lot when I see something move in my peripheral vision. So when I see someone’s hand move my attention goes to them and I am more aware of that. I haven’t noticed me using my face but I know that I do because I can walk in my boss’s office to ask a question and she will know I have a question because of a look on my face. She calls it “my question face”.

    2. From the first audio, I learned that looking someone in the eye in one culture is a sign of respect but in another, it is a sign of disrespect. I have heard of that before but I wasn’t sure what culture that was. I learned it is in Asian culture. It is very different here though because if you are speaking to an adult and you don’t look them in their eyes the reaction is usually “Why aren’t you looking at me when I’m talking to you. You are being so disrespectful.”

    Sidebar: I apologize for not submitting this on time I was at work late yesterday and just got around to this today.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by Jada.
    #63397

    Jada
    Participant

    Hi Kevin,

    I think a lot of people use their hands when they talk as gestures, I feel like its just second nature at least to me. I know people use their faces to show how their feeling at a point in time and your eyebrows are a very big part of that. So I think it was important that you mentioned that specific part of your face. When you’re angry the downward direction of your eyebrows help people see that at a first glance or like you mentioned when you are surprised your eyebrows go up so they play a big part in non-verbal communication.

    #63398

    Jada
    Participant

    Hi Jancelee,

    #63399

    Jada
    Participant

    Hi Janclee,

    I do the same with presentations at school and work so it’s something I try to work on all the time. I don’t think my hand movements are to the point where people think I’m in an argument with someone if I’m having a normal conversation but I can see where that can get misinterpreted. I think that the situation you were put in at the hotel and how you handled it was very good. Most people would react differently if they thought someone was being disrespectful to them rather than go tell someone else. They may not take into consideration how things are different in their culture.

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