ENG 2400 Films from Literature, Spring 2020

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  • #60914

    Prof. Masiello
    Participant

    Why do you suppose the 1968 film version Shakespeare’s play has fewer deaths than in the original story?

    It was not due to budget, time, or censorship, so why are certain dead characters in the play still alive in the film?

    #60927

    Sara Zheng
    Participant

    The director could have thought some death scenes presented in the film would change the viewers opinion on Romeo, who is a heroic young man pursuing for the person he loves. The death of Tybalt helped the story progress and he did not have the best temper, as well as he was the one provoking Romeo of the duel in the first place. As for Paris, his death was not shown in the 1968 film could be because he was not a foul character, which makes there to not be any reasons for Romeo to kill him.

    #60957

    Khomeshwari Sankar
    Participant

    professor i totally agree with Sara Zheng about the director just trying to change the viewers opinion on Romeo.

    #60965

    Prof. Masiello
    Participant

    When people hear the names Romeo or Juliet, they think of young people in love. We tend not to think of Romeo as a teenager in love, not a killer. It seems that most filmed versions of the story do not have Paris killed off or Romeo’s mother dying of grief as in the original play.

    Maybe all these additional deaths can dilute the sadness over the death of the title characters, yet we need the earlier deaths of Mercutio to dramatically “justify” the death of Tybalt, which sets the rest of the story in motion.

    There was an expression during the 1960s with Viet Nam War protestors: “Make Love, Not War!” Also, if you research the ad campaign for the film, it features two young teens in bed (right after they were married). They are tastefully wrapped in sheets. They look like they could be young people of today, not in period costumes, but timelessly young and beautiful.

    #60982

    Sara Zheng
    Participant

    Without Tybalt’s death, Romeo would not have been banished and as stated it sets the story in motion. If Romeo just killed Tybalt without a motive that viewers can sympathize with, it might cause the lead to be seen in a horrible spotlight of “just a killer” as Professor Masiello says.

    #61351

    Tyler Tyson
    Participant

    Similarly to the points made prior to my comment, I feel like the death count was decreased for the audience to not see Romeo as a murderer. Especially, considering that he is never depicted as that throughout entertainment. Romeo killing Paris would negatively affect how the audience views his character (it would have likely made individuals think of him as horrid, selfish, and impulsive). Additionally, the 1968 movie adaptation primarily centers around the love of Romeo and Juliet along with a few of their obstacles. Although one of the important themes in the play is death that aspect is not seen in its entirety during the film.

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