Category Archives: 1101 Portfolio

FINAL DATES, DEADLINES, INFO AND ETC.

And so, we draw to a close.  It has been so great working with all of you.  I said it before, and I’ll say it again, but I have been truly impressed with your work this semester.  You really came through, especially during the pandemic, which goes beyond anything I have literally ever seen (of course). I’m excited to see those final assignments and portfolios.

I will eventually be sending you a little survey in which I ask you to do your own (brief, 1-2 paragraph) reflection on the semester.  This will help us plan next semester’s PD, which will be entirely online! I also want to let you guys know that, though the PD is done,  I am here as a resource for you whenever you need me.  I’ll be continuing Zoom office hours next semester (and a couple of times in August) and also will be around for one-on-one meetings if you need help, have some cool assignments to share or just want to talk!

Here are the amended dates:

May 29th: Final student portfolios to be uploaded to Google Drive.  I’ve sent you this link.  If you did not get it, email me and I’ll resend.

  • Please use the folder “’20 Current PD Portfolios.”
  • Please make a folder with your own name in this format: (HallCarrie_20)
  • Within THAT folder, make subfolders for each class you are teaching with course and section number. (HallCarrie_1101_351).
  • In that folder, you will have either a file or a folder, as you see fit, for each of your students.  Make sure these are also titled clearly by the students’ names (Blair_Ruben) so they can easily be accessed.

June 5th: All of your final drafts of assignments for 1101 and 1121 will be uploaded to the Open Lab.  This is a HARD DEADLINE– as in this is honestly the last possible day! The “deliverables” include: Syllabus (front matter only, you don’t need the full schedule), Assignment Sheets for Units 1,2, and 3 and the handout for the final portfolio: this would include info on the reflection and what the final portfolio should include.

I will attach a copy a template for the 1101 syllabus if you’d like to use it (it’s optional). The 1121 syllabus template is under “Readings: 2020 Winter Institute”

For each of your final assignments, I know this is annoying, but… you will have to post them separately under their correct category.  This will help the next PD be able to look up examples of each assignment.  So, please use the following  format:

  • Categories: FINAL and the unit you are uploading, such as: 1101 Unit 1-Lit Narrative
  • Subject line: (YOUR NAME) FINAL 1101 UNIT 1 ASSIGNMENT

Please don’t forget the category “final” OR the word “Final” in the subject line.  Believe me, it matters in the long run!  Also, you can select two assignment categories, in case you have an assignment sheet that includes, say, 1101 Units 2 and 3, as some of us do.  It’s fine to combine those two.  Please don’t combine all of your materials onto one sheet, though!

Download (PDF, 127KB)

Here is an example of my final portfolio assignment sheet– I gave this to you a MILLION YEARS AGO in the winter, before “the troubles”.  I don’t expect you to be a graphics dork like myself. I also think the reflection Christine and I wrote this semester was much (MUCH) better than this one. However, I include this because it shows what I had my students include in their portfolios:

Download (PDF, 3.41MB)

ENG 1101: Final Reflection

ENG1101: Final Portfolio & Reflection (Reichert)

Along with your final portfolios, which must include the final revised drafts of each of your major essay assignments as well as the reflections for each, I am asking you to write a Final Course Reflection of at least 1000 words. This, along with the other reflective writings you did over the course of the semester and in your portfolios, is one way we package what we’ve learned into something we can take in to the future and TRANSFER to other writing situations in other arenas of your lives.

To start, consider the following prompts:

  • What have you learned about yourself as a reader, writer and scholar this semester?
    • What moments, assignments, readings, conversations, and/or lessons led you think of yourself that way?
  • What from this course will you be able to take with you into other parts of your life? How will this transfer enhance or improve your ability in other writing situations?

Like any other essay we’ve written in class, you should write with a balance of argument and evidence. Think of this as an essay you are writing about yourself and your experience in this course. You are making claims about how you’ve grown, and then you should substantiate those claims with evidence from the course. This can be as simple and informal as a narrative explanation of a moment/assignment/conversation in class, or you can more formally quote from your own writing. As I did on each essay, I will be looking to make sure that each of your claims is supported with specific evidence.

Along with the strength of your argument, I will be reading your reflection for evidence that you were paying attention to and absorbing some of the terminology that we used in our (digital) classroom. Terms like audience, discourse communities, rhetoric, analysis, thesis, revision, “down draft,” etc should be part of the case that you’re making that you indeed learned something in this class. This can be a fun and creative assignment, in which you are telling me the story of your time in my class, but it should also reflect the skill that you’ve gained over the course of the semester.

I will be grading you on:

  • Argument (Claim + Supporting Evidence)
  • Organization (paragraphing and sequence, intro/conclusion)
  • Register (what tone should a reflection take?) & Audience
  • Length, Grammar/Usage/Spelling, Deadlines

Reflection on genre and audience for 1101:  draft.   (James Wu

Reflection on genre and audience for 1101:  draft.   (James Wu)

 

Write a 1000-1500 word reflection on your experiences in this class. How have you improved as a writer and author of multi-modal presentation?

Who are your different audiences? Discuss at least 2 different audiences? An audience is usually not unlimited/infinite/indeterminate.

How does the audience determine the genre of the piece you are creating/producing?

Compare and contrast this to different genres and audiences in music and movies?

What is your relationship as the writer/author to your various audiences? (Discuss at least 2)

How does multi-modal presentation change the “style” of your writing?

What did you learn about designing and packaging a text for electronic display to a specific audience?

We will meet for our final PD meeting of this era TODAY (link at the bottom of this page) Thursday May 14 at 3 pm.  Please make sure you’ve commented on your partner’s units 2 and 3 and you’ve posted your 1101 final reflection assignments.– You can use category “1101 Portfolio.”  We will discuss those things, as well as your final teaching materials (due May 28) and any other questions you may have about finishing up the PD.

Second of all, I’ve set up the drive for the PD portfolios.  We’ve decided to use google drive instead of dropbox because DB was just too glitchy.  Please try to log in now so we can see if there are any problems with you getting in (you may need a google account to access google drive). Please post portfolios by the day grades are due, May 28.

  • Please use the folder “’20 Current PD Portfolios.”
  • Please make a folder with your own name in this format: (HallCarrie_20)
  • Within THAT folder, make subfolders for each class you are teaching with course and section number. (HallCarrie_1101_351).
  • In that folder, you will have either a file or a folder, as you see fit, for each of your students.  Make sure these are also titled clearly by the students’ names (Blair_Ruben) so they can easily be accessed.
I have emailed you the link to the drive but can not post it publicly. Please let me know if you need me to email it to you again!
Here is the link to Thursday’s Zoom:
Carrie Hall is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.
Topic: Last PD meeting!
Time: May 14, 2020 03:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Join Zoom Meeting
Meeting ID: 853 1664 6134
One tap mobile
+16465588656,,85316646134# US (New York)
+13017158592,,85316646134# US (Germantown)
See you at 3 tomorrow!
C

1101 Final Reflection Draft

Final Reflection Assignment, 1000 Words Minimum

As a way to begin your Final Reflection, look back through your work such as in-class writing exercises, homework assignments, earlier reflections, essays/projects, and so on with our learning objectives in mind. As you browse through your work, ask yourself about and take notes on the following questions:

—How would you compare/contrast work done early on in the semester to now?

—What was your favorite/least favorite assignment and why?

—What are some notable lessons that have stuck with you after completing certain assignments?

—What changed in your writing (and reading and thinking)?

—What was your experience revising assignments?

—Was there any peer feedback that really stands out to you and why?

—How did you adapt to the sudden switch to online writing mid-semester?

—What was challenging for you in our course this semester and how did you overcome it (or attempt to)?

*For you Final Reflection, don’t simply answer the above questions—they are just meant to help you brainstorm ideas. After thinking deeply about your work this semester and the material that we’ve read, I want you to pick one of the learning objectives (from the sheet attached to the syllabi) that you feel as if you’ve accomplished. In your reflection, write about the process of achieving the learning objective. Be sure to include writing exercises you did and texts you read that helped you along the way. End your reflection by stating how the selected learning objective will help you in the future–both inside and outside the classroom. 

 

Grading Criteria

A successful reflection: 

—Will be in the correct MLA format (check example on Blackboard). 

—Will be aesthetically pleasing; in other words, it will look neat and organized.

—Will meet the word count requirement to the best of the writer’s ability.

—Will not have extreme spelling and grammatical errors.

–Will state a learning objective and have a clear explanation for how it was achieved.

–Will speak about how the acquisition of the learning outcome with help inside and outside the classroom.

–Will be organized with multiple paragraphs.

1101 Final Reflection-Patrick Redmond

Final Reflection English 1101
Due with final portfolio
1000 words

Assignment
For the final assignment of the semester, you will be reflecting on the progress that you made as a writer during the class. Essentially, your paper will answer:

1. What have you learned about yourself as a reader and writer this semester?
2. How will you be able to transfer the knowledge that you have gained in the class to other writing situations?

To begin this assignment, look back through everything you have written so far in the semester and arrange it from beginning to end. This will allow you to see the progress that you have made as a writer. I then want you to consider the following questions to help you brainstorm your writing:

• How would you compare/contrast work done early on in the semester to now?
• What was your favorite/least favorite assignment and why?
• What are some notable lessons or discussions that have stuck with you after completing certain assignments?
• What has changed in your writing, reading, and critical thinking as you composed in different genres?
• How has your early assumptions/beliefs about yourself and writing changed over the semester?
• What has revision taught you?

You do not have to answer every one of these questions. These are simply meant to help you shake loose some ideas. I do not want your papers to just be a list of answers to these questions, but a fully formed essay. Think about what are the strongest points you want to develop in the reflection. What is most important to tell your reader about your progress?

Grading
I will use the rubric that I have used throughout the semester however these are the main things that I will be looking for:

1. That it is the correct length: The Reflection should be at least 1000 words and you will have points taken off if it does not reach the word limit.

2. That you are conscious of the audience that you are writing towards: Make sure that you write an article about what you’ve learned. It should be written and organized in a way that speaks to an audience like we have talked about in class.

3. That you have supporting evidence and thorough analysis. If you tell me you learned something about yourself as a writer, show me proof! By proof, I specifically mean quotes from your own writing. All reflections should have at least three quotes from your own writing this semester. And, as usual, don’t just drop those quotes in there, make sure you explain why that passage is important to your readers

**Note** No late paper will be accepted and I will not give extensions since it is the end of the semester.

Final Reflection 1101

As noted by others, I used a great deal from the final reflection sent out a few weeks ago!

This assignment will ask you to reflect on your work over the semester, but it must be written in the genre of a “how-to” or self-help. Check out our page for samples! This guide has two drafts. The first one is due on _____ and the final draft is due on _____, with your complete final portfolio. The total word count for this should be around 1000. The main questions are:

What have you learned about yourself as a reader, writer, and scholar this semester? How will you be able to use what you have learned this semester and transfer that knowledge to other writing situations – either in college or in your community? Most importantly, what would you tell others about this experience as a way to help them on their own educational journeys!

As a way to begin this reflection, look back through your work (classwork, blogs, homework assignments, other reflections, and unit projects) and ask yourself the following questions. TAKE NOTES because I expect to see some quotes (at least 3) from your writing assignments. You are not meant to answer all of these point by point throughout the report; they are just to help you brainstorm ideas:

What were your early assumptions/beliefs about yourself and writing? How have they changed? Explain.

What differences did you see in your writing between the first unit and the last two units? Why?

How would you compare/contrast work done early on in the semester to now?

What was your least favorite assignment and why?

What was your least favorite genre and why?

What was your favorite assignment and why?

What was your favorite genre and why?

What are some lessons that stuck with you after completing certain assignments?

What changed in your writing, reading, and thinking as genres changed? *** (I’m looking for you to dig deep here. We have spent a great deal of time studying different genres)

How did you make decisions in your assignments about content and design?

What was your experience revising assignments?

Was there any peer or instructor feedback that stands out to you and why?

What was particularly challenging for you in our course this semester and how did you overcome it (or attempt to)?

What have you used/might you use in other writing courses? In life?

What will I be looking for and grading you on:

  • Attention to the audience, which includes me, but others as well! I don’t want to see just a list of answers. This should look like a “how-to” or self-help guide. Think about it like an interview of yourself as an example of completing the steps in the guide.
  • There should be an organization for this guide. You should have paragraphs and an order that makes sense. It doesn’t have to be the order of the questions.
  • You will need evidence and analysis. The evidence here are quotes from your own writing. If you learned something, show me proof. I need at least three quotes from your own writing, along with the proper set-up and explanations of why those quotes are there.
  • Please proofread. Make sure it is long enough. Make decisions about the words that you choose. Remember that “how-to” guides have a certain tone and language style. ALSO, YOU MUST HAVE A TITLE!!! All successful books do!
  • It must be on time. I expect a rough draft by ______ (so I can give you feedback) and a final draft by _______, along with a complete portfolio.

Final Reflection, ENG1101 (Jessica Penner)

NOTE: Like a few others I’ve seen, this is the tweaked version of Christine’s!

ENG1101

Final Reflection

 We are now at our final writing assignment of a challenging semester. I am so proud of you all for making it to this point. Now it is time for you, as the title suggests, reflect on your work over the semester. For this final assignment, reflect upon the following questions:

  • What have you learned about yourself as a reader, writer, and scholar this semester?
  • How will you be able to use what you have learned this semester and transfer that knowledge to other writing situations—either in college or in your community?

The Reflection is due with your Final Portfolio and should be a minimum of X words.

As a way to begin your Final Reflection, look back through all your work for this class: the three major essays/projects, journal assignments, reflections, and so on. As you browse through your work, ask yourself about and take notes on the following questions:

  • How would you compare/contrast work done early on in the semester to now?
  • What was your favorite/least favorite assignment and why?
  • What are some notable lessons that have stuck with you after completing certain assignments?
  • What changed in your writing (and reading and thinking) as the genres changed?
  • How did you make decisions in your assignment about content and design in Unit 3?
  • What were your early assumptions/beliefs about yourself and writing? Have they since changed? Explain.
  • What was your experience revising assignments?
  • Was there any peer feedback that stands out to you and why?
  • What was particularly challenging for you in our course this semester and how did you overcome it (or attempt to)?

Don’t simply answer the above questions in your final reflection; they are just meant to help you brainstorm ideas. This isn’t just you writing off-the-top of your head; this is a finished piece of writing. Treat yourself as a respected author: you are someone with something to say.

Here’s what I will be looking for:

  • Attention to audience. This essay will be the first item any reader will see in your Final Portfolio. This essay will set a “tone” for all the work that follows. Don’t just list off a bunch of random opinions about your writing—write about what you’ve learned. Prepare the reader for what they’ll see in your Portfolio. This Portfolio will not just be read by me—perfect strangers may read it, and you want them to be impressed!
  • Attention to organization. This does not have to be a traditional organization, but you should have paragraphs (not just a 1,000 word paragraph, please) and some reason for why they’re in the order they’re in!
  • Evidence and analysis. If you tell me you learned something about yourself as a writer, show me proof! By proof, I specifically mean quotes from your own writing. PLEASE NOTE: All reflections should have at least three quotes from your own writing this semester. And, as usual, don’t just drop those quotes in there and expect your readers to figure out why you’ve chosen them. Explain why that passage is important to your readers and to your “so what?”
  • Proofread. Make sure it’s long enough. As usual, you can use whatever language you see fit to use, but make decisions about your language—that is, the words that are there should be there for a reason.
  • It’s gotta be on time. Make sure to post it for the Peer Review session! (The Rough Draft’s due date is X.) You’ve probably never written anything like this before, so I’m sure you’ll want to get some feedback! The final draft of the Final Portfolio (including this Reflection) are due on the last day of this class and I don’t have any leeway because I need to turn grades in.

Final Reflection 1101

This is tweaked version of the one Christine shared with us.

Final Reflection 1101

Congratulations! You’ve completed a substantial body of work. Now it is time for you, as the title suggests, reflect on your work over the semester. For this final assignment, reflect upon the following questions:

What have you learned about yourself as a reader, writer and scholar this semester?

How will you be able to use what you have learned this semester and transfer that knowledge to other writing situations—either in college or in your community?

The Reflection should be a 1000 words.

As a way to begin your Reflection, look back through your compendium of work: in-class writing exercises, homework assignments, earlier reflections, essays/projects, and so on. As you browse through your work, ask yourself about and take notes on the following questions:

  • How would you compare/contrast work done early on in the semester to now?
  • What was your favorite/least favorite assignment and why?
  • What are some notable lessons or discussion posts that have stuck with you after completing certain assignments?
  • What changed in your writing (and reading and thinking) as the genres changed?
  • How did you make decisions in your assignments about content and genre?
  • What were your early assumptions/beliefs about yourself and writing? Have they since changed? Explain.
  • What was your experience revising assignments?
  • Was there any peer feedback that stands out to you and why?

Don’t simply answer the above questions in your final reflection; they are just meant to help you brainstorm ideas. Think about all of the essays we’ve read about writing this semester—some of them certainly hooked your interest while others… probably did not.  The ones that did were well-written, they had a point, the writer had a voice that you felt was worth listening to.  Try to do that in your own writing here.  Remember that this isn’t just you writing off-the-top of your head; this is a finished piece of writing.

You are also open to write this reflection in another genre. For instance, you can write this reflection as a guide, a how-to essay, instructions for succeeding in 1101, etc. If you do choose to write in another genre, you must still address the questions listed above and quote from each of the papers you are including in the writing portfolio. Think of this reflection as an introduction to your portfolio and take the reader on a journey focusing on your academic growth in this class. Don’t be afraid to be honest, if you didn’t find yourself liking a particular assignment, let the reader know.

Here’s what I will be looking for (and grading you on):

  • Attention to audience.You need to have a “so what?” Don’t just list off a bunch of random opinions about your writing—write an article about what you’ve learned. Think about who you are writing for (hint: it’s not just me).
  • Attention to organization. This does not have to be a traditional organization, but you should have paragraphs (not just a 1000 word paragraph, please) and some reason for why they’re in the order they’re in!
  • Evidence and analysis. If you tell me you learned something about yourself as a writer, show me proof! By proof, I specifically mean quotes from your own writing. All reflections should have at least three quotes from your own writing this semester. And, as usual, don’t just drop those quotes in there and expect your readers to figure out why you’ve chosen them. Explain why that passage is important to your readers and to your “so what?”
  • Proofread. Make sure it’s long enough. As usual, you can use whatever language you see fit to use, but make decisionsabout your language—that is, the words that are there should be there for a reason.
  • It’s gotta be on time. The reflection is due TBA and I don’t have any leeway because I need to turn grades in. Make sure to post it by then! You’ve probably never written anything like this before, so I’m sure you’ll want to get some feedback before you submit it with the final portfolio due on TBA (no late portfolios will be accepted)