7th PD Seminar & Homework for 8th PD

  1. Read write-ups about the genre project.
  2. Offer commentary (round robin)
  3. Discussion
  4. Personal Reflection on how to more fully develop the assignment.
  5. Homework:
    • Revise the genre project assignment and write as a new post
    • Add the reflection component to the assignment.
    • Explain which Learning Outcomes the project meets and how.
  6. Please post your reflections about today’s meeting as a reply to this post.

8 thoughts on “7th PD Seminar & Homework for 8th PD

  1. Kim

    Hey Everyone,

    As I reflect on last week’s meeting and our drafts of the RGA and Genre/Multi-Genre assignments, I really started thinking about what outcomes and goals of assignments should be.

    What knowledge, skills, processes, or rhetorical awareness should our students gain by the end of the assignment? And additionally, what final writing products will they produce? What types of written things will they gain experience creating? To what degree is revision involved in this assignment, or between this assignment and others throughout the semester? How will this assignment set up students for future assignments in ENG 1101, ENG 1121, or for future writing situations in college or beyond?

    Along those lines, I have been working on streamlining my ideas for the genre assignment, so that the priorities can be Genre awareness, use of a mentor text to model rhetorical moves, and the incorporation of direct types of research into a final genre creation. We’ll see what emerges tomorrow! Thanks to everyone for the helpful feedback last week.

    I’m starting to feel sad that this week will be our last PD! I’ve learned a ton from everyone.

  2. Jackie Blain

    I love these “robust” discussions lately. My reaction is that we all care about what we’re doing; whether we weep over a beautifully written metaphor or over a low-key low-angle tracking shot, we’re obviously all passionate about doing the best job for our students that we can, even (especially) if it means taking us out of our comfort zones. Like Kim, I’m sad that it’s almost over.

    Looking at the connection between reading and writing will, I think, be something for us all to continue to look at as we move forward. There’s a lot of discussion about how transfer works best if the two are linked, and if reading strategies are presented as tools just like knowledge about genre, discourse community, and context. And apropos of our discussion, I just read a piece by Patrick Sullivan, Howard Tinberg, and Sheridan Blau about how we should not only be pragmatic about analyzing reading, but also take it upon ourselves to try to restore the joy of reading that most kids had before they hit the Common Core and it’s New Crit/textual analysis/only-one-correct-interpretation approach. That’s provocative in and of itself, and I can only imagine what kinds of assignments and activities this group would have come up with in furtherance of those objectives.

    I’m looking forward to tomorrow, my cough notwithstanding. I’ve learned so much!

  3. SSchmerler

    First of all, Jackie killed it. I don’t know how to say anything more or better…about our passion…and, about how we all agree that Reading is going to be the big factor, our next move. Thank you, Jackie. I am gonna miss all of this. It’s like we were working on a play (a musical?) together.community Theater? Drama Dept.? The production is almost over and soon we can’t be geeky and sing songs and talk tech and run-throughs all the time over pizza.

    As for Genre, I feel like it’s the Unit that ate my head. The Unit that set the tone for my own growth in Awareness, and Theory, and Rhetoric, and yet, I can’t seem to make it end in my classroom. I would like to tell my students tonight what Kim just said: about her priorities being “…Genre awareness, use of a mentor text to model rhetorical moves, and the incorporation of direct types of research into a final genre creation.” I hope it’s okay to quote you, Kim.
    It’s May, and I am rushing to keep up. As I see it, the Inquiry Project is the logical springboard for the Multi-Modal Project — only, I didn’t “sell”it to my students that way, outright, and I wish I had. They are trying to wrap their heads around so many new modes, so many new ways of looking at words, putting words down, and now they are trying to understand how I am evaluating — or rather, why I value — all of this. They act like they are in Oz, and they didn’t ask to go there, so they don’t realize how amazing and magical it is and they just keep rubbing their eyes. “Where are we? How’d we get here?””

    Sigh. My “genre” work has been*very* similar to the examples that Robert shared with us. the “Notorious MPG” in particular (though I dislike that title). I need to plan genre out better next time. Like a Road Map. And put those Learning Outcomes right up front, at the top, like a shining city I want them to visit.
    Then, maybe they will thank me for taking them there!

    1. Robert Lestón Post author

      Sarah,
      Your commitment to the group and the project has been outstanding. I know it’s been a lot for you to take in, but you’ve really come a long way. I’m really looking forward to seeing how you continue to develop around the ideas we’ve been discussing all semester.

      Oh, and of course. You make me think of the famous Biggie mural that’s around my block here in BedStuy.

  4. Aaron Barlow

    The genre unit has left me aching, too. It made me realize that I often make assumptions about my students that are not warranted. I am shooting blind, most of the time, and either aim too high or too low–sometimes both. In the future, the genre unit will require much more in-class and low-stakes writing than I gave it, and something that will be much more fun for the students. Before I do it again, I am going to have to clarify for myself much more clearly exactly what my goals are (I had too many, this semester, and they did not mesh well). Frankly, I did not take the unit seriously enough–from my own perspective. I should have “unpacked” it for myself and rebuilt it, using a much more appropriate “scaffolding” than I did this semester. I’m quite annoyed with myself for allowing it to fail!

  5. SSchmerler

    I want to evoke Moses here.. Yes, Moses.Even when faced with The Burning Bush, he demurs and says (and I paraphrase) Someone Else could do this better. Why me, G-d?
    Someone else, besides myself, could do this way better. But: were they willing? Were they called?
    Many of you probably feel as I do.
    Yes, AaronI, I too, would like to have clarified my assignments better for myself and for my students. I, too, have hindsight. But say, weren’t you Moses’ brother?

    I was taught in Hebrew School that every Jew has a little Moses in him or her. A little leader, a little Deliverer.
    And that the best leaders are just a bit stutterers (Moses stuttered, according to scripture) and a bit unprepared.
    Thank You for this cool Deliverance.
    -sarah

  6. SSchmerler

    I want to evoke Moses here.. Yes, Moses.Even when faced with The Burning Bush, he demurs and says (and I paraphrase) Someone Else could do this better. Why me, G-d?
    Someone else, besides myself, could do this way better. But: were they willing? Were they called?
    Many of you probably feel as I do.
    Yes, AaronI, I too, would like to have clarified my assignments better for myself and for my students. I, too, have hindsight. But say, weren’t you Moses’ brother?

    I was taught in Hebrew School that every Jew has a little Moses in him or her. A little leader, a little Deliverer.
    And that the best leaders are just a bit stutterers (Moses stuttered, according to scripture) and a bit unprepared.
    Thank You for this cool Deliverance.
    -sarah

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