In-Class Writing, Business Letter of Dissuasion

As discussed last week, you found an article for today’s class that you would like to dissuade (or argue against) a co-worker from reading it. Unlike our previous assignment, you will not be writing a memo. Instead, you will format your dissuasion in a business letter addressed to me. Your letter should be formatted in this way:

Your Street Address
Your City, State Zip Code
Today’s Date

Professor Jason Ellis
Department of English
New York City College of Technology
300 Jay Street, N512
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Dear Professor Ellis,

Introduction paragraph (give your thesis and brief summary of reasons, include the article’s author, title in quotes, magazine title italicized, and date/issue number)

Expansion paragraph (expand on the reasons against reading the article through discussion, include some summary as appropriate)

Closing paragraph (thank the reader for their attention and offer to discuss the article in person at their convenience)

Sincerely,

(4x lines)

Your Name

23 thoughts on “In-Class Writing, Business Letter of Dissuasion

  1. Ronald Hinds

    106 Garnett Street
    Brooklyn NY 11206
    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street
    Namm Hall 512 (N-512)
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    How are you doing today? I hope that you are doing well.

    I recommend that you do not read “The Robotic Grocery Store of the Future Is Here” by Jamie Condliffe contained in the MIT Technology Review of March/April 2017. This new technology, that he promulgates, will rob me of the contact that I value when I go to shop at my neighborhood grocery store. The hustle and bustle of the workers and the interacting with people from all walks of life is priceless. I like walking through the aisles and smelling the aroma emanating from the deli or the kitchen. Sometimes I eat at the grocery store, as a way, to socialize. Over the years I got to know many regular consumers intimately and we exchanged pleasantries including delicious recipes. I like new innovation but the use of robots is too impersonal. I had a feeling of emptiness and coldness when I read the article. I much prefer a human being to distribute my purchases instead of receiving a delivery from a driverless vehicle. Also as a member of a powerful trade union I want people to have real jobs instead of machines.

    Thank you for your attention and, if you are available, let us meet to continue this discussion over a cup of coffee.

    Sincerely,

    Ronald C. Hinds

  2. Shameena

    104-20 Jamaica Ave
    Queens, N.Y. 11418
    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street, N512
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    Hope everything is going well with you and you’re having a good semester. I am writing you this letter to advise you not to indulge in the article by Elliott, A (October 2016). “A Time of Transition”. Legaltech News, 49-50. My main reason for advising against this article is because of its outrageous claims that any law firms that would like to be around three years need to upgrade their tools in order for them to stay in existence.
    The article explains that artificial intelligence is basically the future of legal technology. However, Elliott proceeded to say that despite the fact that firms will be implementing the use of this new technology they will still need to focus on the people within the firm. They intend on doing this by ensuring that teams are communicating, collaborating and sharing knowledge. This is very controversial since it defeats the purpose of investing in all these new technology and yet still have to be pouring even more resources into employee training. Then yes, this will definitely kill smaller firms. They will probably stand a better chance of surviving by continuing with their current method of business rather than adopting to new technology which will be much more costly for the firm.
    I appreciate you taking time from your busy day to read my letter. However, if you may have any further questions please feel free to let me know and we can make an appointment at your convenience to further discuss.

    Sincerely,

    Shameena Rahaman.

  3. Steven Rivera

    ABC Drive
    Google, World 00001
    23 March, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street
    Namm Hall 512 (N-512)
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    I hope this note finds you in good spirits.

    In the February 2017 issue of Photoshop User, I read an article by Jake Widman that I think you would find upsetting, as I did. Titled “Educational Circles”, he attempts to dive into the process, and reasoning, of a makeover of a logo for a non-profit organization. This article is biased in favor of our industry, and clearly gives praise where it should not. My biggest gripe with this article is that no actual research was presented, and mention of any research was minimal. Knowing full well that a lot of research goes into any design, let alone a logo and potential brand refresh, I feel as though this article failed to give a full account of the process. Unless you know how to do anything of this, anyone reading will fail to learn the real process and work that goes into what we do. These types of article are why many people outside of our industry think we under-perform and are overpaid.

    We can discuss this further at your convenience. Thank you for reading.

    Sincerely,

    Steven Rivera

  4. Zeeshan Ahmad

    2528 Broadway
    New York, NY 10025
    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason W. Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street, N512
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    How are you doing today? I hope you are doing well.

    I recommend that you should not read the article “And the Beat Goes On for the Internet of Things”, by Ed Kirkpatrick, written in the magazine High Tech News in January/February 2017 because of it’s unrealistic statement. This article argues that in the near future, an algorithm will be build which will connect machines with the internet. These machines will correct their own failure algorithms based on the data they will find online and will also find a defect in the machine. It is unrealistic because with internet, a software or program can be updated by itself in the machine, but not the failure algorithms because when the algorithm fails, it will not be able to perform it’s tasks for which it is build.

    Thank you so much for your time today; please let me know if you would like to discuss this further.

    Sincerely,

    Zeeshan Ahmad

  5. Leane

    1709 Sheepshead Bay Rd
    Brooklyn, NY 11235
    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street
    Namm Hall 512 (N-512)
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    How are you doing today?

    I want to share with you my reservations regarding the article “Surviving a bad call” by Katherine Hobson, published in the 2017 issue of U.S. News & World Report, which discusses the medical errors in diagnostics due to medical practitioners neglect to medical records and procedures details. It is known that medical errors raise serious concerns. However, the author of this article does not take into consideration the patient’s’ role in the process and shift all of the blame to medical practitioners, which in turn results in negative public opinion regarding medical professionals and patient’s distrust. Proper diagnostics depends on patient’s truthfulness with the doctor and successful treatment is build upon good treatment adherence. Without full disclosure of the events and/or symptoms from a patient it may be difficult for the physician to provide an accurate diagnosis and/or treatment. Therefore, in my respectful opinion, in her article Katherine Hobson criticizes medical professionals for their errors unfairly.

    Thank you for your time today and please let me know if you would like to discuss this further.

    Sincerely,

    Leane Valor

  6. Jose A. Jimenez

    368 Broadway Suite 5
    NY, NY 10013
    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street,
    Namm Hall (N-512)
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    How are you doing today? I hope that you are doing great. Navigating on the internet today I found an article on LA Times that made me waste of time, can you believe that the government want to merge all telecommunications infrastructure in Mexico to break TV and Telephone monopolies; this article was written by Tracy Wilkinson, titled “ Mexico’s plan to smash TV, phone monopolies spurs fears of censorship.” Posted March 31, 2014.

    If this passes law the Interior Ministry would get permission to monitor the content of television and radio broadcast to confirm that are are following all the rules and regulations of the law. Some part of the law that has increased fear among the Mexican people because it might give the government power to censor a lot of content, like they did before when they had a weak opposition. Television in mexico has been dominated by Televisa, which is one of the biggest broadcaster in the spanish-speaking latin american world, there’s another company called (TV Azteca, which dominates the rest of the TV) but the are not going to hard on them. On the other hand, telephone service, both landline and cellular is controlled by Carlos Slim, one of the richest men in the world. On the telephone issue, the law is trying to eliminate the sketchy and expensive phone service provided by Carlos Slim, such as fees on national calls, long distance throughout Mexico territory fees, and more fees if you call someone out of their system. Also, these telephone companies will have to share some of their infrastructure and towers with upstart firms. According to the articles, “several experts say, is much harder on telephone companies because Slim didn’t support Peña Nieto’s candidacy than– on Televisa and the TV monopolies that backed the president’s campaign.” This law might be a revenge to Carlos Slim by Peña Nieto, which I’m pretty sure he is going to disagree.

    Thank you for your time today; please let me know if you would like to discuss this further.

    Sincerely,

    Jose A. Jimenez

  7. Anelsy R

    123 Seaman ave apt 5
    New York, NY 10002
    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street
    Namm Hall 512 (N-512)
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    How are you doing today? I hope that you are doing well. We miss you here.

    Sometime stories are not well explaining, and the one that I read is one of this. When you begin to read the story, you are lost. I was reading the story thinking that maybe later I will understand the drama, it was so confuse.The ideas are lost, and sometime you can even connect the ideas thinking what is the reason of that?. I finished to read it, and I could not understand what the outcome was. the story is called “Black Box” by Jennifer Edgan, and you can find it In the book The Literary Experience published on May 1, 2015. The author tells us the story about a beautiful girl who is an spy and her whole body was modified with spy tools just like a robot. she is trying to catch a bad guy using her beautiful body. I asked others about this story and they said the same like. I do not recommend it to read. The story does not have sense, and at the end of the story you will feel like you waste your time with that. I know that you will blame yourself several months if you read it. This is a really bad story. Do not read it.

    Thank you for your time today. We should meet to talk about that. Please let me know if you would like to discuss this further.

    Sincerely,

    Anelsy Rodriguez

  8. Jozef

    248 W 42nd Street
    New York, NY, 10036
    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street
    Namm Hall 512 (N-512)
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    How are you today? I hope that you have been well.

    I would like to point out to you an article I have recently read by the title “What’s Good for the Goose”, which can be found in the monthly magazine In These Times. The article’s author is Dayton Martindale, and you can find the article in the April 2017 Volume 41(4) issue. After having read the article on two occasions, I have come to the conclusion that it is not a good article, and I will explain why that is. In a nutshell you should know that the article’s purpose is to persuade the reader that animals need the freedom to roam around in their natural habitat as much as they like, instead of being captivated in a superficial environment such as a zoo. While there is absolutely nothing wrong with the outline of the article, or the issue at hand in itself, the author then proceeds to base their argument largely on a book he read to write this article. The confusion starts at this point, as it becomes very unclear whether the article is intended to be a book review, or an article for which the author has used a book relevant to the topic as a research help. Had Martindale written a book review as such, then the reader would be able to make an educated decision whether it would be worth to read the book, or not. Instead, as stated above, the author fails to make a clear distinction between a book review and a well-researched article, leaving the reader in no-man’s land wondering what exactly the author is trying to achieve with this article.

    Thank you for your time today, and please let me know if you would like to discuss this further in person, or over the phone.

    Sincerely,

    Jozef Loderer

  9. Leonardo Calegare

    303 Camelot View Street
    Brooklyn, NY 11231
    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street, N512
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    How are you doing today? I hope this letter finds you well.

    I am discouraging you to read the article by Doug Main titled, “They Know Why You’re Sad…- Mental Illness Causes more Misery Than Poverty or Unemployment,” published by Newsweek magazine on March 17, 2017, because it’s written in a way that it offers only a mediocre (at best) solution to a problem as a whole, without visiting what causes the symptoms and how these symptoms can be treated in the first place. The article relies on a study done by the London School of Economics, where it shows that misery is experienced by many people in many countries, even when the very same people have a job and make a decent living, and how GPD would increase if people with mental illnesses were treated quickly. Alternatively, the article offers only as solution to push Congress, here in the U.S., to pass laws that treat mental illnesses the same we treat physical problems to young adults and youth as young as 5-years old. More, there is no evidence in the article of how symptoms of mental illnesses are discovered so that through small changes people can change how they feel about themselves. Overall, the article pushes only a grand version of what the law can maybe do for the overall benefit of society without taking in consideration the ramification of such lawmaking ar who’s agenda is behind this push.

    Thank you for your time devoted to this letter, and please let me know if you want to discuss this further.

    Sincerely,

    Leonardo Calegare

  10. Chauncey Dumaguing

    80-26 162nd Street
    Jamaica, New York 11432
    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street, N512
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    I hope you are doing well today. I am creating this letter to talk to you about this article I have read recently. The article in question is called, “The Fight to Wrap Cheapo Cars in Luxurious Silence,” which was written by Eric Adams.

    I personally believe that you shouldn’t read the article, “The Fight to Wrap Cheapo Cars in Luxurious Silence.” Written by Eric Adams and found in the magazine, Wired, the article talks about how cheaper cars developed by companies like Honda, Volkswagen, Nissan, and Mazda are reducing the noise in their cars caused by parts like engines and tires as well as factors that are caused outside of the car. The article, dated March 23, 2017, mentions that luxury brand cars usually have the ability to create the silence along with other nice features because of the cost to reduce the noise is really expensive. However, car companies like Honda and Volkswagen are achieve what luxury cars can do by redesigning certain parts of their respective cars to reduce the noise you would hear inside the car. Although an interesting article after reading the first two paragraphs, I would advise you not to read it. One reason is that even though the article does mention one way the other car companies are doing to reduce noise, each company is only listing one way they are doing this. The method each company mentions is also only for one factor of the many that generates the noise you hear inside cars. I personally would like to know of ways they can reduce the noise since each method doesn’t completely silence out the noise that is being generated from the many factors the article has listed.

    Thank you for your time in reading my letter. If you want to talk more about the article I have mentioned to you, contact me if you want to discuss the topic any further.

    Sincerely

    Chauncey Dumaguing

  11. Win

    555 68Street, APT 9F
    Brooklyn, NY 11220

    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street
    Namm Hall 512 (N-512)
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    I would like to write you this dis waving memo about the article written by Nikitas, T (March 2017). “The Rebirth of Tintype: An Old Photographic Medium Is Revitalized,” Popular Photography, 81(1), 68-69). The author discuss about the three photographers who try old tintype photographic technique again.

    Tintype method has been obsoleted for nearly 100 years. A few years ago, the method wes reused by three photographers, (out of millions of photographers who even never heard it before). I feel the head line of the article is too exaggerated. Even the standard film camera are very rare to see these days. Everyone is shooting digital which is very convenient – using a phone camera to digital SLRs. Tintype is an extremely slow method and almost impractical. Beside, it is very dangerous to handle photo developing chemicals, which are toxic, harm to environment and extremely flammable.

    If you have spare time, I will be happy to discuss this article in person. Thank you for your time.

    Sincerely,

    Win Naing

  12. luisvasconez23

    100 Avenue P
    Brooklyn, NY 11204
    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street
    Namm Hall 512 (N-512)
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    How are you doing? I hope that you are doing well.

    I’m writing you this letter because i believe you shouldn’t read this article “Luminar” by Dave Stevenson. I found this article in the magazine Mac Life from the month of February 2017. The reason why I have no doubt to suggest you shouldn’t waste your time reading this article is because it talks about another photo-editing app. According to Stevenson this app adapts to your pictures. Basically is an app that has few filters which they change the saturation and the vibrancy of the picture. It doesn’t allow you to edit your photo like other photo-editing apps would such as Photoshop. It does not have a toolbar to let you choose what parts of your picture you will like to edit. It will apply its filters to the entire photo. Reading this article will not encourage you to buy this app or yet to even find the app interesting. I found a waste of time reading this article and i’m sure you will too.

    Thank you for your time: please let me know if you would like to discuss this further.

    Sincerely,

    Luis L. Vasconez

  13. kangyiliu

    37-22 111St 1FL
    Corona, NY 11368
    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street, N512
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    How are you doing today? I hope that you are doing well.

    I would like to dissuade you from reading the article “ How many AA batteries would it take to start a car?” by Gemma O’Brien, because it waste time to build a batteries by putting batteries to create a 250A current to start the engine. According to How many AA batteries would it take to start a car?, “starting the engine will require 250 amps for a half second, and the most current a 1.5-volt aa battery can produce is 10 amps…you’d need to start with a string of eight AAs to get your necessary current 250 amps you’ d need 25 parallel strings of eight AAs (25 x 10 amps =250amps). So in a strictly theoretical world, 200 AA batteries ought to be able to start a typical midsize car -once” (O’brien, G., A. (2016, Jan) Popular Mechanics, 193 NO.1 , 32.). It means that to start a car you need 200 AA current, you need 8 batteries in series to create 12v and we need 25 strings to create 250 amps. Nobody will use 200 batteries to start a car, because it has three disadvantages. First, it takes too much time to build the circuit, Second, it is much more expansive than a 12v 250 amp battery, Third, you have to replace new battery since it is one good for once. Therefore, I don’t want you waste time to read this article.

    Thank your for your time today, please let me know if you would like to discuss this further.

    Sincerely,

    Kangyi liu

  14. Doneek Drumgo

    1210 Sutter Avenue
    Brooklyn, NY 11208
    March 3, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street, N512
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    How are you doing today? I hope that your day is going well for you.

    The article” Writing the Rules of Cyberwar;” by Karl Rauscher is not an article that I would recommend to you. I found this article in a magazine called” IEEE Spectrum.” The magazine issue number is 12 and the article was published in December 2013. The main point of this article was about identifying the reasoning’s cyber attacks happen and the ways to help prevent them. The author did not elaborate well on the ideas that he proposed to help fix the issue of cyber attacks. Also he gave very little examples of cyber attacks and he put no emphasis on how cyber attacks can affect our future. One idea the author proposed to fixing cyber attacks is increasing security on the Internet. He did not go into detail on how an increase of security on the Internet would actually help prevent cyber attacks. Another idea was gathering parties in the white house to get them more involved with this problem of cyber attacks. Rauscher didn’t really talk about how the parties in the white house would help influence the attempt to prevent cyber attacks. Rauscher should’ve used more cyber attack events throughout the years to show the cruelty of cyber attacks. He only gave a few and they all were around the same time. He needed to show how cyber attacks has progressed or regressed over the years. Also as a reader, you are left wondering how bad is cyber attacks going to affect my future? Rauscher doesn’t do well in talking about how cyber attacks would intervene in our future lives. Overall, this article is not something that you should waste your time reading.

    I would like to thank you for your attention to this letter. I would like to discuss this article further with you whenever you are available. It was nice to share my thoughts about this article with you.

    Sincerely,

    Doneek Drumgo

  15. Daniel

    118 Riverton Ave.
    Queens, 11412
    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street, N512
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    There’s an article posted in IEEE Spectrum that I feel you shouldn’t waste your time reading through. When you see the title “Treating Depression With tDCS: Startup Ybrain Aims for the Mainstream” with the byline Eliza Strickland, I recommend you skip the page. The reasons for this is because this article is more of a theory based piece rather than a breakthrough. The article goes on to introduce a headband that can ‘cure’ depression by zaps in the brain. “A doctor’s prescription for clinical depression could one day sound like this: In the comfort of your own home, slip on a brain-zapping headband a few times per week. For 20 minutes, send a tiny stream of electricity through your brain.” (Strickland, 2017).

    This is all done by a startup company called YBrain and he biggest issue with this article is that with the human brain there’s a lot of things science doesn’t know yet; to shock one’s brain for over a period of time can be harmful. If this was a special kind of treatment for depression that’s one thing but it seems as if it’s marketed as an household item, luckily so far it’s only being tested in Korea but unfortunately there’s plans on worldwide marketing.As know about the brain it works as electrical pulses travel through the synapse creating more connections overlapping, with this new product an external pulse is introduced that may over stimulate the brain which can lead to severe outcomes.

    Closing paragraph (thank the reader for their attention and offer to discuss the article in person at their convenience)
    I appreciate you time and if you agree with my points we can continue this conversation next time I see you.

    Sincerely,

    Daniel.O.L

  16. sjm

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street, N512
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Jason Ellis,

    How have you’ve you been lately? I hope all is well.

    Lately, i’ve been reading magazine on different subject and topics and recently came across an article online on the website of Discover. An author who goes by the name Jeremy Hsu, wrote an article title “Google Dreams of Drone Food Delivery for Six Dollars”. According to the article, It stated that “ Google has been dreaming of hot pizzas and freshly-made coffee descending from the sky to your doorstep.” Now that line was a an incredible attention grabber. Google is a amazing company, always designing and creating the latest tech. At google X technologies lab, they are currently creating a drone that can deliver food to your area close by to you, all for a fee of $6. Virginia tech, is the first campus to enjoy the idea of having burritos deliver to student doorstep. Nowadays there are different types of delivering services such as amazon prime now fresh food and Uber eats. With “Project Wings -Drone” this can be huge competition in term of delivering services. This article are every element to it, such as computer programming, electrical engineering, and financial.

    I brought this article to your attention, simply because i was draw to the title and i thought i’ll pass the information along. Thank you for taking the time to read what i have written, please let me know if you will like to discuss this further.

    Sincerely,

    Steven Mathieu

    Preference:
    Hsu, Jeremy. “Google Dreams of Drone Food Delivery for Six Dollars”. Science for the curious, Discover. December 10, 2016.

  17. Isaiah

    Isaiah Emanuel
    123A 2nd Pl #4
    Brooklyn, NY 11231
    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street
    Namm Hall 512 (N-512)
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    How are you doing today? I hope that you are doing well.

    I recently read an article from author Don Phillips, entitled: “The circus fades into history”, from Trains magazine, April 2017. I do not agree with what this article suggests. I do not think you should read this article because it suggest that Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey’s trains of running for their last miles. The article says that the owner of the circus could not change with the world in a profitable way. Surely I believe that is not true because I believe that others will be willing to find a profitable way to run the circus in today’s world. For example when the Twinkies factory shut down, many people said that we would never be able to buy Twinkies again, but a different company is currently running the company now. Even the train cars can be cleaned, remodeled and resell. I thought that I could tell you about this article not to read.

    Thank you for time today; please let me know if you would like to discuss this further.

    Sincerely,

    Isaiah Emanuel

  18. kangyiliu

    37-22 111St 1FL
    Corona, NY 11368
    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street, N512
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    How are you doing today? I hope that you are doing well.

    I would like to dissuade you from reading the article “ How many AA batteries would it take to start a car?” by Gemma O’Brien, because it waste time to build a batteries by putting batteries to create a 250A current to start the engine. According to How many AA batteries would it take to start a car?, “starting the engine will require 250 amps for a half second, and the most current a 1.5-volt aa battery can produce is 10 amps…you’d need to start with a string of eight AAs to get your necessary current 250 amps you’ d need 25 parallel strings of eight AAs (25 x 10 amps =250amps). So in a strictly theoretical world, 200 AA batteries ought to be able to start a typical midsize car -once” (O’brien, G., A. (2016, Jan) Popular Mechanics, 193 NO.1 , 32.). It means that to start a car we need 200 AA batteries where 8 batteries in series to create 12v and 25 strings of 8 batteries to create 250 amps. Nobody will use 200 batteries to start a car, because it has three disadvantages. First, it takes too much time to build the circuit, Second, it is much more expansive than a 12v 250 amp battery, Third, you have to replace new battery since it is only good for once. Therefore, I don’t want you waste time to read this article.

    Thank your for your time today, please let me know if you would like to discuss this further.

    Sincerely,

    Kangyi liu

  19. Maoya

    173-20.89th ave
    Jamaica, NY 11432
    3/23/2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street, N512
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Jeroma wingket,

    How are you?Hope everything is okay with you.I would like to dissuade the article by Meg Kinnard, “Wi-Fi on wheels:Google helps students get online ,on the go.”Which was issued on March 20,2017.

    In this article the author says that,student can able to finish their homework or study very fast with this wi-fi wheels.This is good options like student can study while they traveling from home to school.Some student live far from their school, so it can be advantage for them.Google hopes to expand the Wi-Fi program into other rural areas across the country to get other students help with that like other areas where it already has data centers, which process search queries and other information.Google is focusing on rural area where people can barely get Wi-Fi network.In this article i personally like one point but in another point it make me think negative too. Because the school going kids are entering their adults life and they think very fast and react. With this opportunity maybe they are not respect people, instead of doing homework maybe they watch negative site.Before introducing anything need to think about positive and negative side.

    Thank you for your time today.Hopefully next time we will discuss about this matter deeply.

    Sincerely,

    Kazi Maoya

  20. Maoya

    173-20.89th ave
    Jamaica, NY 11432
    3/23/2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street, N512
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis ,

    How are you?Hope everything is okay with you.I would like to dissuade the article by Meg Kinnard, “Wi-Fi on wheels:Google helps students get online ,on the go.”Which was issued on March 20,2017.

    In this article the author says that,student can able to finish their homework or study very fast with this wi-fi wheels.This is good options like student can study while they traveling from home to school.Some student live far from their school, so it can be advantage for them.Google hopes to expand the Wi-Fi program into other rural areas across the country to get other students help with that like other areas where it already has data centers, which process search queries and other information.Google is focusing on rural area where people can barely get Wi-Fi network.In this article i personally like one point but in another point it make me think negative too. Because the school going kids are entering their adults life and they think very fast and react. With this opportunity maybe they are not respect people, instead of doing homework maybe they watch negative site.Before introducing anything need to think about positive and negative side.

    Thank you for your time today.Hopefully next time we will discuss about this matter deeply.

    Sincerely,

    Kazi Maoya

  21. Sandra Huerta

    Sandra Huerta
    6 Metro Tech
    Brooklyn, NY 11201
    March 23, 2017

    Professor Jason Ellis
    Department of English
    New York City College of Technology
    300 Jay Street, N512
    Brooklyn, NY 11201

    Dear Professor Ellis,

    I hope you’re doing well.

    I suggest you do not read this article, entitled MacDonald, Brad. “President Obama’s Hidden Legacy.” The Philadelphia Trumpet. March 2017, Volume 28. No. 3. This is the opinion of a white supremacist who does not want America to keep on moving forward but instead to return to the worst of times.

    Although we both agree President Obama created a lot of help not only for minorities but for the economically struggling individuals in the whole country with his healthcare plan, he arose the idea of creating an America where people are equal and exposed the reality of white supremacy within our law department there are still a lot of people who think he was and will be the worst president in history. According to Brad MacDonald Obama has influenced people in a wrong way and even if executive orders are signed by President Trump, the majority of the society would not approve to follow the law since mentalities have already changed. The author writes “The only way to truly roll back the Obama years is to change our own hearts and attitudes toward law,” to change our heart and attitudes towards like law is like returning back to slavery when the masters kept slaves from rebelling by convincing them it was God’s plan to be abused all their lives. It is impossible to keep our “hearts open” when these executive orders destroy the fundamental rights of Americans.

    Thank you for your time, please contact me if you would like to discuss this further during lunch.

    Sincerely,

    Sandra Huerta.

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