Class 8 – How Text and Paragraphs are Affected by Different Alignments

We took a look at the various formats of text alignments and how text is affected. Here are some the things we noticed:

  • flush left/ragged right – when using this text alignment, we are given a bit of breathing room, or negative space. This makes the page seem less crowded with text and allows places for the eyes to rest. In our culture, we read from left to right, and setting type flush left gives the reader an exact starting place on each line. The reader isn’t slowed down by trying to find the starting place for the next time.
  • flush right/ragged left – when using this text alignment,¬†the reader is slowed down because the eye has to find the starting point of each line. Have the left margin set as ragged means each line will begin at a different location. It is ok to use this very small amounts of type such as for captions, but you wouldn’t use this for large bodies of type.
  • center alignment – not a good choice for large bodies of text. Again, each line of text has a different starting place and this slows down the reading. Poetry and songs often use this alignment.
  • justified alignment – both sides of the type are justified and line up evenly. Because of this, type is pushed out which can cause excess word spacing, which can cause rivers.¬†In order to fix the word and letter spacing problems, each line may need tracking. Another problem that may arise might be too many hyphenated words.¬†InDesign will try to fit as many words on each line as possible but so justified text can also fit more text on a page.

Homework – Due Wed, 3/2

  • Type Book – Type Alignment exercise. You can download the pages of instructions here.
  • Type Book – Type Alignment2. This packet contains the rest of the exercises for alignment, leading, tracking and kerning. Download that file here. Both assignments are due Monday, 3/7.

Class 5 – The Grid System and Why We Use It

Here’s a brief recap from last Wednesday’s class. One of the main things we covered was how to work with the grid system.

A grid is a non printing system of horizontal and vertical lines which help the designer align the elements of the layout. This system of alignment helps to create a more organized layout. In multiple page documents, the grid assists in the consistent placement of design elements. Think of the grid as the skeleton of the layout.

Vocabulary used:

  • text page – the area on a page, within the margins, where text appears.
  • margin¬†– the area of the page around the text area.
  • folios –¬†the page number. In most instances this is at the bottom of the page below or outside the text area.
  • header – the area at the top of the page, outside the text area. A running header is a header that is repeated across many pages
  • footer – the area at the bottom of the page, outside the text area. A running footer is a footer that is repeated across many pages.
  • gutter – the gutter separates the columns and rows from each other. It is also the area where two facing pages meet.
  • active corner – the upper left corner of any field in a grid system. This is where the top of the text is aligned.
  • passive corner – the bottom right corner of any field in a grid.

Review pages 177-221 of our textbook for full details.

In InDesign we learned to set up columns for a grid, how to use a temple, and how to save a file as a PDF. We did this as we were introduced to the Type Book project.

Homework Due Monday, 2/22

Class 4 – Introduction to Adobe InDesign CC

After a few exercises to review letterspacing, tracking and kerning, we began to explore the working environment of Adobe InDesign.

Areas covered:

  • Creating a new document
  • The InDesign workspace
  • Working with text boxes, fonts, point sizes, leading alignment
  • Leading, measurements, kerning

 

Forms of text alignment:

  • flush right (aka flush right/ragged left) = the text is aligned on the right edge and the left edge is ragged
  • flush left (aka flush left/ragged right) = the text is aligned on the left edge and the right edge is ragged
  • center = lines of text with the midpoints aligned
  • justified = the right and left edges are aligned

If you missed the class, here is a video that might help you out. It is a bit long but complete in helping your get started:

 

Homework ‚ÄĒ Due Wed,¬†2/17/16

  • Reading Assignment in textbook: Grid System pgs 177 -221 (be prepared to answer one quiz question on this topic)
  • Typography in your neighborhood – As you travel through your neighborhood, look and the typography and take photos of the different type you see. Write 2 paragraphs explaining with the typography in your neighborhood reflects about your neighborhood. Use Google Docs and add the photos to the document. Use no more than 4 images. The typography might be seen on signs, storefronts, buildings, etc.
  • Spend a some time reviewing the articles posted by your classmates and leave comments.
  • Watch¬†the video:¬†Typography & Design below