2017 Literary Arts Festival

The LAF(literary Arts Festival) is a festival celebrating literary writing. It host a writing competition every year. The festival opened up with a short video, featuring many of the novels that students are currently reading. Also, it included The LAF group tackling the mannequin challenge which I found hilariousness. Their were 2 students who were co-hosting the festival. Their humor was a bit off and dry. But I think the guy did a better job than the girl.

Students who submitted their works and won, read their short stories, poetry , and songs. Out of all the readings and performances, 2 stood out to me. Deja Simpson reading of “Tied my Hands”. I found it moving and captivating. Secondly, Lirazen Felipe performance of her song “The Greatest thing”. It was nice, pleasant, and catchy. This was the highlight of the show for me. In between readings, their was a dance performance by city tech steppers. I found this amusing. I did not know we had a step team.

In addition , Their was a special guest presentation. One of the students introduced Rowan Ricardo Philips, poet and author of Heaven,The Ground, and When Blackness Rhymes with Blackness. He read some of his work. In between reads he made a few jokes. Moreover, he gave us a taste of some of his current and new writings.

Finally, their were readings from faculty . The Staff called up all the winners up to the stage to award them a certificate. Afterwords, the show ended. The festival served food and drinks upstairs in the cafeteria for the staff, audience members and winners.The LAF was over all entertaining.

Literary Arts Experience

Attending the Literary Arts Festival, I found it to be interesting, if not a bit boring.  Because I came in late at 6:00 pm, the auditorium that the festival was held in was full.  Thankfully, the cafeteria had television that shows what’s going on in the festival and speakers so that I and several other people in the cafeteria could listen to what’s going on.  From what I observed, the festival wasn’t a large room with booths and a stage like what I expecting from a festival, but just simply a stage for several writers to read the winning stories, plays, and poetry.  In hindsight, that would make sense since the point of the Literary Arts Festival is to celebrate writing and a way to do that is to read out the best stories to an audience.  Once the speakers stopped working and several people including myself couldn’t hear anything, we went downstairs to be let into the auditorium to listen to the Festival, where we were able to gain seats to listen to a dance group performing during the Festival as well as listen to the written works.

The dance group was an entertaining group to both watch and listen to.  The main reason I wanted to listen to the dance group, as well as watch their dance, was because as I was watching it on the television in the cafeteria, they look rather silly without the sound moving about.  Since their moved so strange to me, I figured that the sound was a key element missing that without it, the dance made little sense.  After getting in the auditorium, I learned that this dance was a step dance with a lot of stomping and clapping, which made a lot more sense to me.  The dance was very entertaining, though I didn’t care to much about what the dancers were shouting as they danced.  After the performance, the Festival resumed with more written work readings.

Some of the written works I listen to I recognised due to previously reading them with my Creative Writing class.  One of them was called Washington Mews, which I believe is about a moment when a buy and a girl breaks up.  The part of the poem that clued me in on the idea was when the lady in the poem turned around and walked away like she would did on a bar stool, but “the joy gone out of it now”.  This part tells me that not only are they breaking up, but in the same area they either first met or meet a lot up in.  As the man calls out, the lady kept walking, indicating that whatever relationship they had is over.  As she left, she said something in a different language that means something on the lines of he wants her and sometimes, she wants him too.  I think that this meant that though that the lady is breaking up with the guy, she is hurt like how the guy is hurt, even though it’s over for both of them.

The Festival was entertaining, but I wasn’t able to fulling pay attention to many of the written works without spacing out and losing what’s going on in the written works.  However, in the end, I found the Festival to be nice.

Extra Credit Opportunity: Literary Arts Festival

Thursday, April 27th at 5:30pm is City Tech’s Literary Arts Festival City Tech’s Literary Roundtable featuring readings and performances by students and faculty and featured poet and essayist Rowan Ricardo Phillips. The event is on campus (Voorhees Theater, 186 Jay Street), free, & no tickets are required (seating is first come, first served). Visit the link above for full details.

This is a totally optional event, but I encourage you to attend if you can and to share what you’ve learned with the class. If you attend & blog in response by Su 4/30, you will get extra credit (yay!). This extra credit will replace a missing blog if you missed some blogs, or it will count as extra credit if already you did all of your blogs (bonus points). Please note that there are only two grades for this extra credit blog: 100 and 0. If you attend the event and blog your responses/reflections thoughtfully and comprehensively, you will receive 100% (otherwise,  you will receive no credit).

Don’t forget to take notes at the event, so you can include concrete details in your blog. Please categorize your blog as “Literary Arts Festival.”

Submit Your Writing to the Literary Arts Festival Writing Competition (deadline March 7th)!

Please see the below message from Professor Kwong about this great opportunity to submit your writing to the Literary Arts Festival Writing Competition The deadline is this coming Tuesday, March 7th.

Dear students,

The Literary Arts Festival wants to celebrate your creativity!  To make that happen, we’ve extended our submission deadline through the end of Tuesday, March 7.  If you’re sitting on writing that stirs the imagination and challenges the mind – we want to read it.

To submit, just go to openlab.citytech.cuny.edu/literaryartsfestival, review our “Submission Guidelines,” and scroll down to choose the category that best suits you.  We’re looking for poetry, fiction, plays and essays.  Winners will enjoy acclaim and accolades at our Literary Arts Festival on April 27.

Thanks for contributing to the creative life of our community!

sincerely,

Professor Kwong
LKwong@citytech.cuny.edu

Extra Credit Opportunity! City Tech’s Literary Roundtable

Next Tuesday (3/7) is City Tech’s Literary Roundtable featuring Sarah Schulman. The event is on campus, free, & no tickets are required. Visit the link above for full details.

This is a totally optional event, but I encourage you to attend if you can and to share what you’ve learned with the class. If you attend & blog in response by F 3/10, you will get extra credit (yay!). This extra credit will replace a missing blog if you missed some blogs, or it will count as extra credit if already you did all of your blogs (bonus points). Please note that there are only two grades for this extra credit blog: 100 and 0. If you attend the event and blog your responses/reflections thoughtfully and comprehensively, you will receive 100% (otherwise,  you will receive no credit). Don’t forget to take notes at the event, so you can include concrete details in your blog. Please categorize your blog as “Literary Roundtable.”