Professor Belli | Fall 2022 | City Tech

Category: Writing Workshops (Page 1 of 2)

Unit 4 Peer Review

Thank you to those of you who submitted your first drafts of the Final Reflection for Unit 4. Just as we did with Units 1-3, we’re going to use peer review to get feedback and guide revision for the final draft. Feedback on your peers’ work is due by noon (12pm) on Friday, 12/16. 

Thank you for sticking to this deadline, so that everyone has sufficient time to work on revisions over the weekend.


After reading & annotating this post, please go back to review the Unit 1 Peer Review Writing Workshop, which has important information about Peer Review (purpose, expectation, grading, Peer Review worksheet, etc.) that also applies to this and future peer review assignments. Make sure, also, to review the Unit 4 Assignment and the Unit 4 Writing Workshop (including the new Week 17 content, just posted today). When reviewing your peers’ work, pay attention to the following:

  • Does the Final Reflection have all the required components?
  • Are quotations (from the peers’ own work this semester) included and integrated effectively?
  • Is the work organized effectively / cohesively? Pay attention to things such as the order of paragraphs, topic sentences, transitions … reverse outline will be helpful!
  • What was your experience reading the Final Reflection?
  • What was something you really liked about it / think was done well? What were you confused by? What could use improvement? (be specific!)

As always, one of the best things about peer review is that as we become more skilled readers of others’ writing, we also can turn that critical eye to our on writing. So after you peer review your group members’ writing, go back and do the peer review on yourself. You’ll be amazed at the progress / revisions you can make!


Just like before, Peer Review will be happening in Perusall. I have created “Assignments” for each of the first drafts, so go to the two essays you are assigned to, and complete the work from there.

There is also a new “folder” in the Perusall Library, entitled “Student Work: Final Reflection First Drafts” (look within the “Unit 4″ folder).

As always, you can view all submitted first drafts, but you are each only responsible for peer-reviewing two projects (see below for your assigned groups).

*Note: If you did not submit a first draft by the deadline (W 12/14 by 12pm), you will not get the benefit of peer review. However, you are still part of a peer review group, and are responsible for reading and commenting on your two assigned essays. Peer Review groups are listed below.


[Submitted Unit 4: Final Reflection first drafts, which will be peer-reviewed]

Brandon

The following students should peer-review Brandon’s Final Reflection:

  • Tahani
  • Neal
  • Jamani
  • Henry
  • Holaly
  • Khandoker
  • Syed Abbas
  • McKayla
  • Aniyla
  • Zavier
  • Syed Ali

Henry

The following students should peer-review Henry’s Final Reflection:

  • Neal
  • Brandon
  • Holaly
  • Tahani
  • David
  • Destiny
  • Syed Ali
  • Sebastian
  • Jeffrey
  • McKayla

Tahani

The following students should peer-review Tahani’s Final Reflection:

  • Khandoker
  • Henry
  • Brandon
  • David
  • Jamani
  • Zavier
  • Syed Abbas
  • Sebastian
  • Aniyla
  • Destiny
  • Jeffrey

Unit 4: Final Portfolio & Reflection

In this Writing Workshop, we’ll be exploring & scaffolding the Unit 4: Final Portfolio & Reflection assignment together. As with the Writing Workshops for Units 1-3, I’ll be rolling out content periodically here over a few weeks, as we advance to each stage of the assignment (each week’s content is separated & labeled below).


Week 16

As you know from reading the Unit 4: Final Portfolio & Reflection assignment, this final project focuses on revision & reflection. These are two things that we’ve been focusing on all semester, so you’re very prepared to be successful on Unit 4. Think of all the revision you’ve done, both on informal and formal assignments and through peer review, as well as the significant reflective writing you’ve produced with the Cover Letters for Units 1 & 2 and the Artist Statement from Unit 3. Unit 4 builds on these skills … you got this everyone!

Final Portfolio

The Final Portfolio is mandatory, with required revisions for both Unit 1 and Unit 2 (revisions for Unit 3 are optional). The good news — I fully expect everyone to strengthen this previous work through their revisions! Keep in mind that when you submitted your Education Narrative (Unit 1) back in September, you had just started college and the course. Think of all you’ve learned over the past few months, and how much you’ve grown as a writer and how much confidence and how many skills you’ve acquired. Now you get to re-visit that previous writing from this new (stronger!) place, and make it even better!

Reflection

This Final Reflection is also mandatory. It is a cumulative, holistic reflection on your experiences in the course this semester, including your struggles, triumphs, and growth as a reader, writer, thinker, and student. There is no “right” way to do this, though your reflection should be a thorough and thoughtful piece of writing that that critically reflects on your growth in the course and how this semester and our work together has shaped this growth.

Below are some types on content + organization:

Although this is a personal reflection, it is not “anything goes”; it requires a significant amount of brainstorming / drafting / revision. The assignment requires you to turn a critical eye on the course (which requires you engage with it, even if you did not enjoy all aspects of it!), your experiences, and, most significantly, yourself. You will be evaluated on the completeness, complexity, specifics, and thoughtfulness of your reflections as well as the quality of your writing (e.g., organization, topic sentences, transitions, sentence-level style & correctness).

  • You should write this reflective essay in the first person.
  • This final assignment is reflective but it should also be driven by critical thinking and analysis (subsequent claims and evidence). Remember that the purpose of this reflection is not to merely summarize (simply report what we’ve done in class or what the texts we read are about) or to write about some idea (e.g., growth) in general, but to critically consider how your encounter with the course has influenced you.
  • Keep in mind that, as in your blog posts, Perusall annotations, Class Discussions, peer review … you can’t discuss everything. Spend time choosing and focusing your ideas before you start drafting your Final Reflection.
  • This Final Reflection extends the thinking and writing you have already done in class and in your blogging. Therefore, while you should of course feel free to build on what you have already written this semester in blogs or other informal writing (or what we have discussed in class), do not simply repeat what you have previously stated elsewhere.
  • This Final Reflection builds from your close reading of your experiences and writing in dialogue with the course. Any discussion should stay grounded in the core reflection/discussion of your experiences this semester. As always, choose specific quotes and examples from your own writing (or other course content) that are relevant to your claims and use them in the service of supporting these ideas. Remember that each quote / example should be not only relevant but also introduced, explained and analyzed, relevant, and cited.
  • Structure the Final Reflection according to your argument, avoiding mere summary, on the one hand, and the five-paragraph essay, on the other. When critically discussing your experiences in the courses, you should structure your essay according to your thesis (your argument about your growth in this class), not necessarily according to the order of the experiences or course content themselves. You can describe but you must also analyze and provide argument (make meaning out of those descriptions and analyses).
  • Your Final Reflection should include: a focused Introduction paragraph; body paragraphs that provide additional claims (topic sentences) and specific, concrete details and examples in support of both these claims and your overall thesis (do not keep repeating the same idea over and over again in different ideas); logical connections / transitions among sentences, paragraphs, and ideas (claims); a concluding paragraph.
  • Follow the Assignments: Formatting, Guidelines, and Submission expectations, and the helpful tips/strategies provided below and the materials under Writing Resources.

Grading + Deadlines

First, I want to be super-duper (duper!) clear about the deadline. It is on Tuesday, December 20th (by 11:59pm), and it is a hard deadline. I know I’ve been able to offer you extensions in the past on Units 1-3, but I don’t have that luxury this time around. Faculty have to submit grades to the college just a few days after the semester ends, so 12/20 is non-negotiable. If you do not submit by the deadline to the Dropbox link on the Schedule, you will receive no credit for the work. Late assignments will not be accepted.

A few words on grading, to clarify how Unit 4 factors into your overall course grade. This Final Reflection takes the place of a final exam, and asks you to synthesize and critically describe / evaluate your experiences, efforts, and growth in the course. It counts as 10% of your overall course grade.

As for the Final Portfolio, the super-duper (duper!) good news is that if you earn a better grade on your revision (which I anticipate you will, if you put in the time, effort, and care to revise well), that is the grade that sticks. So, for example, if you earned a B- on your Unit 1 final draft, but your Unit 1 revision for this assignment earns an A, then you get the A. It completely overrides the previous grade. That means that you can significantly increase your course grade by 40% (because Unit 1 & 2 were each worth 20%). This is my way of rewarding those of you who worked consistently this semester — I told you to trust in and commit to the process … it really works!

Of course, the flip side of this is true too: if you don’t submit a revision or completely blow it off and only change a few typos, your grade can go down too (and that is the grade that sticks).

*Note: revisions are only accepted for previously submitted work. So if you missed an assignment, you can’t revise it at this point. The Final Portfolio showcases revision, process, and progress (not last-minute submissions of long overdue work). trusted in and committed to the process.

If you missed one of these assignments (Unit 1 or Unit 2), please see me ASAP in my Office Hours to discuss your situation and options for moving forward. Please note that if you missed two major assignments (Unit 1, Unit 2, and Unit 3) it will not be possible to pass the course at this point.

Engage & Receive Support

Once you’ve read through this week’s Writing Workshop content, drop a comment below with any questions or comments, and to share how your plan for working on Unit 4 through early next week (this is required by 12pm on F 12/9).

Friendly reminder that I’ve pushed back the first draft of the Final Reflection to mid-next week (you’re welcome!) to give you more time to review all your previous work and to draft new content, but that means you should be making good use of this weekend to make significant progress (there is only one more weekend after this one before the deadline!).

As always, I’m here to help and support you with your portfolios & reflection. If you would like to discuss your revisions or reflection draft, drop in to one of my Office Hours (I’ll be offering a few additional Pop-Up options before the end of the semester too, to give you more options to come see me). It’s been so lovely to have so many of you come to see me this semester to conference — I welcome you to continue doing so as we move through this final push of the semester 🙂


Week 17

Thanks to those of you who submitted your first draft of the Final Reflection this week — hoping Peer Review on those drafts goes well! I also was glad to see your Unit 4 Progress Posts roll through. Some of you could definitely use some more clarity & specificity in your plans for revision. I encourage you to re-visit the Time Management resources & tips in the Week 13 Class Discussion to help you plan realistically for finishing up this project.

Additional Revision Notes

Please note, too, that in terms of the new drafts of your previous Units 1 & 2, your revision should be substantial. Everyone has lots of room for improvement, and while I provided detailed feedback for you on your work, of course I could not address everything that could be improved. So turn your own critical eye back on your own writing, using all the skills you’ve learned this semester, and really work on that revision!

Speaking of substantive revision, you also want to make sure that the final draft of your Final Reflection is thoroughly updated to reflect all the revisions and progress you made as you work to revise & create your Final Portfolio. This means that you should return to your Final Reflection again and again (writing is a process!), and revise it thoroughly even after your Unit 1 and 2 Revisions are done.

Additional Helpful Resources

Consult these resources to support you in Unit 4:

  • Portfolio presentation (from Professor Carrie Hall, City Tech’s Director of First Year Writing)
  • Here is a Reflection Planning document, to help you as you revise your prior work for your Portfolio and to incorporate the work you did for those revisions into your Final Reflection:
  • Definitely go back and revisit your blog post (from Week 2!) that you wrote to your end-of-the-semester self. It’s wild to think about, but you are now that end-of-the-semester self that you wrote to (you are both author and intended audience!). See how far you’ve come!
  • Review the Plagiarism resources provided earlier this semester (see both the Schedule and Syllabus for more details). Note: any material that is plagiarized automatically receives a zero and will be reported to the college (as required by college policy). If you have any questions about plagiarism, please see me in my Office Hours to discuss.

Key Unit 4 Details & Logistics

Last week’s Workshop material (Week 16) here had a lot of important content about logistics too, so please take time to review that. Below are some additional details about wrapping up Unit 4:

  • For Unit 4, you are submitting three distinct files to the Dropbox link on the Schedule page (more, if you choose to include the optional Unit 3 Revision): 1) Final Reflection; 2) Unit 1 Revision; 3) Unit 2 Revision. [note: each of these files has multiple components — keep on reading for more details!]
  • The Final Reflection should be substantive (1000-1500 words).
  • Include a Cover Letter for your Final Reflection that describes in detail your draft / revision process (Note: as always, Cover Letters are required but don’t count towards the assignment word count).
  • For Unit 1 and Unit 2, make sure to include: 1) a paragraph (aka, a new Cover Letter) that describes in detail your revisions for this final (final) draft of the Unit; 2) your previous grade / my written feedback on the assignment (copy/paste this directly over from OpenLab Gradebook); 3) the new Final (final) draft of the Unit; 4) the previous Final Draft (that you submitted earlier the semester). The order should be as listed above. Including all these items (and clearly labeling them) helps me immensely to evaluate your work as process and portfolio, as well as the quality of your revisions. *Portfolios that do not include all FOUR of these items — 1) Cover Letter; 2) prior grade/my feedback; 3) new Final Draft; 4) previously submitted final draft — will not be accepted.
  • As for the “paragraph” at the beginning of each revised Unit, this is basically a new Cover Letter. But it should be solely focused on the revisions you did for this final draft. The Cover Letter paragraph should be substantive, and must directly address the changes you made, and my written feedback and any conferences with me. Of course, you are welcome to write more than one paragraph (and I encourage it!). These Cover Letters are a crucial (and empowered/empowering!) part of your Final Portfolio: in them, you are guiding me through the Portfolio, and the more you can show me and highlight your intentional and thoughtful revisions, the better it will be all-around. If I have to scour both drafts and look for teeny changes here or there, that will be much more difficult (and, trust me, less successful for you!).
  • The Unit 4 Final Draft will be submitted via Dropbox. The Dropbox link will go live on Monday, 12/19 on the Schedule for Week 18. I really want everyone to take all the time provided to work on revisions and the reflection: if you think you’re done, put the work away for a day or two, and then come back to it with fresh eyes. And definitely, give everything an additional read through (at least 1x, but ideally 2-3x), reading aloud slowly to edit and proofread. This is a good way to catch sentence-level errors, and to do final polishing of your work. These little details matter … remember, you want to put forward the best version of yourself and your work!
  • You will submit multiple files to the Dropbox link for Unit 4, all clearly-labeled and as Word documents: the Final Reflection, Unit 1 Revision (mandatory), Unit 2 revision (mandatory), Unit 3 (revision optional). Make sure each file has all required components (see details above)

Engage & Receive Support

Please note that my final Office Hour of the Fall 2022 semester will be a Pop-Up Office Hour this coming Monday (12/19), 10:00-11:00am. It’s listed on the Schedule (for Week 18) already, and I want to give you a heads-up here so that if you want to come to see me to discuss anything about your work in the course, you should plan ahead.

I’m happy to discuss drafts and revisions in my Office Hours, but it will not be possible to provide written feedback at this late date (e.g., over email). So if you want additional feedback, come see me on Monday 10:00-11:00am, or on Thursday (12/15) in this week’s regularly scheduled Office Hour (11:30am-12:30pm).

Required Comments by 12pm (noon) on Friday, 12/16: Any questions at all, about anything related to Unit 4. Now is the time to ask them, so use the space below for that. If you don’t have any questions, then in a comment simply confirm you’ve read and reviewed everything related to Unit 4 and you’re good to go.

Thanks all, and happy revising 🙂

Unit 3 Peer Review

Thank you to those of you who submitted your first drafts of the Unit 3: Writing in a New Genre assignment. Just as we did with Units 1 and 2, we’re going to use peer review to get feedback and guide revision for the final draft. Feedback on your peers’ work is due by noon (12pm) on Friday, 12/2. 

Thank you for sticking to this deadline, so that everyone has sufficient time to work on revisions over the weekend.


After reading & annotating this post, please go back to review the Unit 1 Peer Review Writing Workshop, which has important information about Peer Review (purpose, expectation, grading, Peer Review worksheet, etc.) that also applies to this and future peer review assignments. Make sure, also, to review the Unit 3 Assignment (especially the Artist Statement Guidelines), and the Unit 3 Writing Workshop (including the student work examples I provided). When reviewing your peers’ work, pay attention to the following:

  • Is the new genre piece effective for the intended audience, genre, & publication?
  • Does the new genre piece follow (apply) the conventions of the chosen genre?
  • Is the research incorporated effectively / accurately (including integration of quotations and citations)?
  • Does the Artist’s Statement have all the required components?
  • Is the work organized effectively / cohesively? Pay attention to things such as the order of paragraphs, topic sentences, transitions … reverse outline will be helpful!
  • What was your experience reading the project?
  • What did you learn? What were you confused by?

One of the best things about peer review is that as we become more skilled readers of others’ writing, we also can turn that critical eye to our on writing. So after you peer review your group members’ writing, go back and do the peer review on yourself. You’ll be amazed at the progress / revisions you can make!


Just like before, Peer Review will be happening in Perusall. I have created “Assignments” for each of the first drafts, so go to the two essays you are assigned to, and complete the work from there.

There is also a new “folder” in the Perusall Library, entitled “Student Work: Writing in a New Genre First Drafts” (look within the “Unit 3″ folder): each students who submitted work has two files there. Make sure to review & peer review both files (the new genre piece & the accompanying Artist’s Statement).

As always, you can view all submitted first drafts, but you are each only responsible for peer-reviewing two projects (see below for your assigned groups).

*Note: If you did not submit a first draft by the deadline (W 11/30 by 12pm), you will not get the benefit of peer review. However, you are still part of a peer review group, and are responsible for reading and commenting on your two assigned essays. Peer Review groups are listed below.


[Submitted Unit 3: Writing in a New Genre projects, which will be peer-reviewed]

Brandon

The following students should peer-review Brandon’s Unit 3 work:

  • Tahani
  • Logan
  • Neal
  • Jamani
  • Khandoker
  • Syed Abbas
  • McKayla
  • Aniyla
  • Zavier

Henry

The following students should peer-review Henry’s Unit 3 work:

  • Neal
  • Brandon
  • Holaly
  • Jamani
  • Destiny
  • Syed Ali
  • Sebastian
  • David
  • Jeffrey

Neal

The following students should peer-review Neal’s Unit 3 work:

  • Brandon
  • Henry
  • Holaly
  • Tahani
  • Destiny
  • Syed Ali
  • McKayla
  • Jeffrey

Tahani

The following students should peer-review Tahani’s Unit 3 work:

  • Khandoker
  • Henry
  • Brandon
  • Logan
  • Syed Abbas
  • Sebastian
  • David
  • Zavier
  • Aniyla

Know Your Mentor Text

This is a follow-up exercise to the “Know Your Publication” activity we did last week. This week’s exercise involves studying a “mentor text,” or a particular source (in a particular genre, for a particular publication) that uses a similar style that you’re working on for your Unit 3 piece.

With the “Know Your Publication” activity, you looked at publications and online forums where you might want to publish or present your work. Now, let’s look a little closer. Go back to this site (magazine, webpage, YouTube channel, etc.) and find a specific source that you like. This source should not be about your topic — that’s now what we’re looking at it for at this point. You’re just looking at what features (conventions) make this text fit this publication (and this genre!)  This can be an article, TED Talk, YouTube video, etc.

*Remember: You’re not looking for any old text. You’re looking for an article that can be published in the magazine you want your work to be published in, or a YouTube video that fits on the channel you want your video to go on, etc. This should be a source you want to emulate.


Once you find your “mentor text,” answer the following questions:

  • What tone/ type of language does this example use?
  • How does this source use research? (e.g., do they quote from outside sources, use a lot of statistics, etc.)
  • What can you tell us about this source visually (and auditorily, if applicable)? Does it use a lot of imagery and color? Is the layout very clean? Is there a soundtrack?
  • How long is it? (words, pages, minutes)
  • Who do you think is the audience of this source? What makes you think that?
  • What aspects of this source would you like to emulate in your own writing? Why? How might you do that?
  • What aspects of this source would you like to avoid in your own writing? Why? How will you do that?

Share your answers with the class by leaving them as a comment on this post by W 11/23 at 12pm (noon). Don’t forget to state, at the beginning of your comment:

  • what your topic is
  • who your intended audience is
  • what genre you’re using for Unit 3
  • what publication/forum you’ve looked at (provide a link too!)
  • the mentor text (don’t forget the link!)

Know Your Publication

We’ve spent a while now thinking about who needs to hear your research (the ideal audience) and the best genre to present that research. Now we’re going to layer on, with an activity that will help you to identify places your writing could be published (or posted).

There are a whole range of different publication sites (e.g., an online magazine, like Teen Vogue, a forum like TED Talks, or The New York Times “Opinion” section). Take some time to explore possible publication forums for your particular genre piece (paying particular attention to the rhetorical situation, such as your intent / purpose, audience, message, etc). Then identify one particular publication forum you think is ideal for your Unit 3 piece.

Your goal, as always, is to be intentional & specific — target your efforts for particular project. If you’re writing a short story, look at a collection of short stories. If you’re writing an article for an online magazine, consider your audience and think about which is best and why (e.g., Teen Vogue is not the same as The Atlantic). If you’re writing an OpEd, look for the OpEd section of a major newspaper (such as The New York Times). If you’re making a YouTube video, look at a particular channel that produces similar content and reaches a similar audience. And so on.

*If you have a particular genre you want to write in, but you haven’t been able to find a forum where it would be published or posted, don’t immediately switch genres! Talk to me first &/or ask your classmates for help … I’m sure we can find something.


On your own, answer the following “Know Your Publication” questions for that publication or forum.

Know Your Publication Questions:

  • What kinds of articles/ stories/ media (and ads and videos for that matter!) are on that site?
  • What does that tell you about who they think their audience is? How do you draw that conclusion?
  • How long are the pieces usually? (pages, words, minutes)
  • What is the tone, usually? (e.g., funny, serious, casual)
  • What kind of diction is usually used? (e.g., casual, formal, academic)
  • How do they usually use evidence / support (such as data, quotations, interviews)?
  • What can you tell us about their visual presentation? Is it all black and white text? Video with lots of graphics? A mix? Something else altogether?
  • Do you think this would be a good publication or forum to reach your intended audience? Why or why not?

Share your answers with the class by leaving a comment on this post by 12pm (noon) on Friday, 11/18.

Make sure to include, at the beginning of your comment:

1) what your topic is
2) who your audience is
3) what your genre is
4) what publication/forum you’ve looked at (don’t forget to cite/link to it!)

Thanks all! Together we’ll review & discuss your content in this Class Discussion at the end of the week … can’t wait to see what you come up with here 🙂

Unit 3: Writing in a New Genre

In this Writing Workshop, we’ll be introducing and working through the Unit 3: Writing in a New Genre assignment together. As with the Writing Workshops for Units 1 & 2, I’ll be rolling out content periodically here over the next few weeks, as we advance to each stage of the assignment (each week’s content is separated & labeled below).


Week 12 Content

First things first: please read + annotate the Unit 3: Writing in a New Genre assignment. Get a feel for its purpose, components, & expectations.

After reading the assignment, you’ll see how Unit 2 leads into Unit 3. You’ll use the same content (the research you found and conclusions you drew) but present it in a new way, for a new audience.

To get the ball rolling, do some freewriting on the following prompt & then drop a comment below with some thoughts. Then go back & respond to your classmates’ comments (everyone should post their initial comment by W 11/9 at 12pm):

At the end of Unit 2, you decided who you thought needed to hear about your research. Who was that? Do you need to narrow that down a bit?  What genre do you think is best to reach that audience?


Week 13 Content

This week we’re working to clarify (with as much specificity as possible) the particular audience & genre of your Unit 3 piece, and then to make some real progress on planning & drafting that piece.

I know it can seem daunting at first (and overwhelming!) in terms of how to even get started composing in a new genre. Those feelings are normal and expected, but they are not a reason to shy away from pursuing something out of your comfort zone. I really encourage you to consider creative genres that incorporate multimedia (rather than just written text). The process can actually be really fun for you, you’ll learn a lot of new skills along the way, and you’ll be on your way to producing a really fantastic, unique Unit 3 project!

Examples of genres you might try are YouTube videos, Ted Talks, a series of social media posts (e.g., Instagram, TikTok), children’s books, creative writing (short story, poem, play, etc.), graphic novel / comic / manga, letter to a politician, posters, pamphlet, blog post, magazine article, podcast, etc.

Interested in pursuing one of these genres but are not sure how to get started? Not to worry … I and your classmates are here to support you! Later this week I’ll be sharing some resources to help you create in these new genres, and we’ll continue to crowdsource additional technologies, tips, & tools for working in a variety of genres. None of us are experts in these genres, so we’re all learning together.

Contribute: After reading Week 13 content here & engaging in this week’s Peer Review assignment (use their feedback to help you with revisions), leave a comment below that explains:

  • your specific audience (e.g., not just “those interested in my topic”)
  • specific genre (not just “an article of some kind”)
  • why you choose these things

The goal with this comment is to state your intentions and rationale (for both audience & genre), and be as clear & specific as possible. Comments due by noon (12pm) on W 11/16.

Check out these Helpful Resources for Creating New Genres & add your own!


Week 14 Content

This week we’re focusing on drafting your genre pieces and Artist Statements.

The first thing you should do for this week’s Unit 3 Writing Workshop is to read + annotate the “Artist Statement Guidelines” in the Unit 3 Assignment (scroll down to the bottom for this new content). The Artist Statement is a required, critical component of Unit 3 (no projects will be receive credit within it).

You’ll notice that the Artist Statement is a reflective piece of writing — luckily, you’ve had a lot of practice in this genre already with the Cover Letters that you wrote for the final drafts of Unit 1 and Unit 2.

*Note: for Unit 3, you won’t be writing a separate Cover Letter.

After you’ve familiarized yourself with the Artist Statement Guidelines, explore the examples of Unit 3 student work below:

[Unit 3: Writing in a New Genre]

[Unit 3: Artist’s Statement]

Reviewed the above examples? Don’t forget to check out these Helpful Resources for Creating New Genres (introduced in Week 13) & add your own!

*Finally, add a comment below with a brief update on your progress to-date! Comments should be made on W 11/23, and are required from everyone. If you have any questions, you can also ask them in the comment section below.


Let’s Discuss!

Use the comment section below to ask any & all questions about the Unit 3 assignment more generally as well. As always, review all materials (and click all links) before asking questions, as you may find the answer you’re looking for there. But if not, ask away!

Unit 2 Peer Review

Thank you to those of you who submitted your first drafts of the Unit 2: Reflective Annotated Bibliography assignment. Just as we did with Unit 1, we’re going to use peer review to get feedback and guide revision for the final draft. Feedback on your peers’ work is due by noon (12pm) on Friday, 11/4. Thank you for sticking to this deadline, so that everyone has sufficient time to work on revisions over the weekend.


After reading & annotating this post, please go back to review the Unit 1 Peer Review Writing Workshop, which has important information about Peer Review (purpose, expectation, grading, Peer Review worksheet, etc.) that also applies to this and future peer review assignments. Make sure, also, to review the Unit 2 Assignment (especially the Reflective Annotated Bibliography Road Map), and the Unit 2 Writing Workshop (including the student work examples I provided). When reviewing your peers’ work, pay attention to the following:

  • Are all components there? What about all components of each component? (if not, what’s missing?)
  • Are the three source entries from different genres?
  • What could you add to make this more cohesive as a document?
  • Is it formatted well (accessible to your readers)?
  • What was your experience reading the assignment?
  • What did you learn? What were you confused by?

One of the best things about peer review is that as we become more skilled readers of others’ writing, we also can turn that critical eye to our on writing. So after you peer review your group members’ writing, go back and do the peer review on yourself. You’ll be amazed at the progress / revisions you can make!


Same as last time, Peer Review will be happening in Perusall. I have created “Assignments” for each of the first drafts, so go to the two essays you are assigned to, and complete the work from there.

There is also a new “folder” in the Perusall Library, entitled “Student Work: Reflective Annotated Bibliography First Drafts” (look within the “Unit 2″ folder): each essay is there. You can view all submitted essays, but you are each only responsible for peer-reviewing two essays (see below for your assigned essays). *Note: If you did not submit a first draft by the deadline (W 11/2 by 12pm), you will not get the benefit of peer review. However, you are still part of a peer review group, and are responsible for reading and commenting on your two assigned essays. Peer Review groups are listed below.


[Submitted Reflective Annotated Bibliographies (RAB), which will be peer-reviewed]

Brandon

The following students should peer-review Brandon’s RAB:

  • Neal
  • Syed Abbas
  • Jamani
  • McKayla
  • Aniyla
  • Jenry
  • Zavier
  • Jeffrey

Henry

The following students should peer-review Henry’s RAB:

  • Holaly
  • Tahani
  • Jamani
  • Destiny
  • Syed Ali
  • Sebastian
  • Jenry

Jamani:

The following students should peer-review Jamani’s RAB:

  • Henry
  • Brandon
  • Neal
  • Logan
  • Khandoker
  • David
  • Zavier
  • Aniyla

Neal

The following students should peer-review Neal’s RAB:

  • Holaly
  • Tahani
  • Destiny
  • Syed Ali
  • McKayla
  • Khandoker
  • Jeffrey

Tahani

The following students should peer-review Tahani’s RAB:

  • Henry
  • Brandon
  • Syed Abbas
  • Logan
  • Sebastian
  • David

Library & Research Resources

For this Writing Workshop, we’re fortunate to have a guest post from Professor Berger, an Instruction and Scholarly Communications Librarian here at City Tech.

As you know, Unit 2 is all about research; this week we’re moving forward with finding, evaluating, and integrating sources. I’m so grateful to Professor Berger for sharing all of this helpful information, and for her support for our course and you all throughout the research process this semester.

Please read + annotate her post & the linked resources, and then come back here and participate in our Class Discussion. Everyone should join the conversation!

To get the ball rolling, once you’ve read through everything, comment below and do these three things:

  • to say hi to Professor Berger
  • share your research question with her
  • ask a question about the library and/or doing research more generally

“Welcome to the library! The library is a welcoming place and City Tech’s librarians are very devoted to helping our students. Although this course is online, this post is an introduction to the library, virtual and in-person, and shares some highlights of what we have to offer.

I think the most important thing you can learn from this blog post is that City Tech librarians are here to help you. We teach you how to find and evaluate sources for your schoolwork, develop your topic and research question, and other related skills. Although we recommend you come to the ASK A LIBRARIAN desk and talk with us in person, we also provide a variety of online help options including 24/7 chat reference and research appointments. The chat reference is found on our homepage.

The library is located on the fourth floor of the Library Building. Here are some highlights of the physical library … In addition to books you can take home for eight weeks, the library has textbooks you can use in the library for two hours as well as calculators you can borrow for 1 or 2 days. We even have laptops, ipads, headphones, and many public computers as well. Study rooms are available for individual and group study and come with a computer. We have a large graphic novels collection under the staircase leading up to our upper floor. Lastly, we provide free scanning and students can print up to 150 pages per week.

Here’s an overview to help you with English 1101. Find quick information about the library in our student-focused Frequently Asked Questions or FAQs. On this same page, you’ll notice there is information about getting access to materials in the library. It’s easy. Just log in with your CUNY email address (the same address you use to register for classes, log into Blackboard, etc.).  

Consider the library as a resource for certain types of genres. Although you will use the Internet to find videos, songs, websites, etc., you can find additional types of genres in the library. The most common genres you can find in the library include:

  1. Books and book chapters
  2. Newspaper articles
  3. Magazine articles
  4. Scholarly journal articles aka peer reviewed journal articles

The library has tutorials and guides to help you find sources in different genres and support your assignments for this course. Our guide for English 1101 has everything you need to teach yourself how to find sources in the library, evaluate any source, and learn MLA citation.

Getting Started: Start by watching our orientation video. It can be found in the GETTING STARTED tab of the guide for English 1101. We have a four minute video about a research question in the GETTING STARTED tab as well. This video will help you begin to narrow down your research question so it isn’t too broad.

Find Books: This section of the guide helps you find ebooks. You may find a book chapter which is much shorter and may be more specific. Don’t forget that if you find an ebook through the library, you can generate a citation from the record. Interesting in finding  hard copy books? Here’s a guide.

Other useful tabsEVALUATING SOURCES helps evaluate any source whether it is on the Internet or the library. BACKGROUND RESEARCH guides you through the process of learning more about your research topic through encyclopedia articles geared to college students. We think that knowing the basic facts about your topic is essential to further research. The encyclopedia articles you find through the library are usually 3-5 pages. They also may list sources on your topic you can use for your annotated bibliography. We particularly recommend Gale Virtual Reference LibraryScholarly vs. Popular Research will explain how they are different. If you are interested in a current event, take a look at the section on how to research current events which provides links to key newspapers.

Step-by-Step Research Activity:  This is an interactive form that helps you easily find sources in the library walking you through the entire research process including getting background information and evaluation of your sources. The Step-by-Step Research Activity guides you to use Academic Search Complete which is a great all-purpose library database (collection of articles). You can also search the library’s search bar on the homepage but it is like Google. That means it is easy to use and that you get too many results.

Citation: Get help on MLA style in the final tab of the English 1101 guide. Did you know if you find a source that is based in the library, you can easily get a citation from the library search engine or the specific ebook, newspaper, magazine, or journal when you click through to the full text?

You can also email or download ebook chapters and articles from the library and get the citation with your email. Don’t forget to select MLA citation style! You can also try Zoterobib as an alternative to Easybib for generating citations to websites like YouTube.”

Unit 2: Reflective Annotated Bibliography Assignment

In this Writing Workshop, we’ll be revisiting & reviewing the Unit 2: Reflective Annotated Bibliography (RAB) assignment together. I’ll be rolling out content periodically here over the next few weeks, as we advance to each stage of the assignment. Later this week (after reading / commenting on your individual research question posts), I’ll be sharing additional advice for how to for further focus/narrow/refine your research questions. And next week we’ll be deep-diving into the act of research itself (where to find sources, how to evaluate them, etc.). I’ll also be adding more details about due dates, samples of student work, resources for quoting and citation, and much more. But for now, we will begin with the idea of research as discovery.


Hold on though … before you go any further, go back and re-read the assignment (and make any additional annotations, as necessary) to refresh your memory on what the purpose and expectations of Unit 2 are. After you’ve finished that, keep on reading here …


Research as Discovery (Wednesday, 10/12)

A friendly reminder that we are continuing the conversation about our assumptions, expectations, and experiences with research in the Class Discussion What Counts as Research?? … so be sure to check that out, read through the additional resource and prompts I posted this week, catch up on your classmates’ comments, and add your additional thoughts there.

Now on to some new content! Below is an audio file I created for you to explore this concept (and its importance for a successful Unit 2 outcome) even further. Listen / annotate it, and then drop a comment below with what resonated with you / what you took away from it, as well as any questions you might have.

Research as Discovery (Professor Belli)


Week 10: Creating Successful Source Entries + Looking Forward to Final Draft of RAB

I’ve created additional content for this Unit 2 Writing Workshop, covering source entries, citation, titles, summary, rhetorical analysis, types of sources, research strategies, & what’s coming up next week (among other things). Click on the audio link below, and then listen & annotate it.

Unit 2 Workshop, Additional Content (Professor Belli)

*Note: the audio file fails to mention the 4th required component of the source entry: quotables. My apologies for that, and please don’t forget to include quotables at the end of each source entry.


Week 11 Content

[Examples of Unit 2 Student Work]

[Resources]

[Cover Letter Instructions]

An important component of any writing is your reflection on it. This Reflection is your Cover Letter, and must be included with your final draft of Unit 2.

  • Your Cover Letter should be 2-3 paragraphs, single-spaced (note: this letter does not count toward the minimum length of your Reflective Annotated Bibliography)
  • Address it to your reader (that’s me! e.g., Dear Professor Belli …)
  • Write in first person (it can be informal/personal)
  • Include the Cover Letter as the first page of your Dropbox submission file
  • Submissions without a Reflective Cover letter will not be accepted & will receive no credit

This Cover Letter presents the process behind your Reflective Annotated Bibliography, and therefore doesn’t restate what your Reflective Annotated Bibliography shares (the product) but rather discusses your drafting/revising process for this assignment.

Even though this is your Final Draft submission to me, you should have gone through a number of steps before you hand it in (pre-drafts such as brainstorming, freewriting, outlining; drafts of different components of the assignment; revision based on my written feedback and peer review; conferences with me and Writing Center tutors; revision, editing, proofreading). This Cover Letter is a thoughtful reflection on how your Reflective Annotated Bibliography has changed along the way.

Respond to the questions below holistically, in paragraph form (not in bullets, or in any particular order). But also feel free to add any other questions/concerns you have about your Reflective Annotated Bibliography or the writing process.

  • What is your research question and argument, and how have they evolved throughout the Unit 2 project?
  • Describe your drafting and revision process. What was most successful? Most challenging?  How did you approach those challenges? How did my written feedback and peer review (along with any discussions you may have had with me in my Office Hours or tutoring at the Writing Center) help you with these revisions?
  • What’s the primary question about your Reflective Annotated Bibliography that you most would like to get feedback on, and why?
  • Choose two elements of your Reflective Annotated Bibliography–one that you think works well, and one that feels less successful–and describe why.
  • What would you continue to work on in further revision?

 


 

Let’s Discuss!

Use the comment section below to ask any & all questions about the assignment more generally as well. As always, review all materials (and click all links) before asking questions, as you may find the answer you’re looking for there. But if not, ask away!

Blogging Workshop

As part of our “take stock of where we’ve been & where we’re going” work this week, let’s take some time to revisit blogging as a genre, its expectations, and your work so far this semester.

*A friendly reminder that blogging consists of both posting and commenting, and I collectively refer to this as “OpenLab Composing” on the Syllabus and in the course.

Below you’ll find some clarification on some common issues I’m seeing with blogging, along with more general information about my expectations for blogging in our course. And, of course, the OpenLab Team’s OpenLab for Students is a wonderful resource to help you with all-things-OpenLab!


Posting vs. Commenting
Sometimes you need to make your own post (which only members of this course on the OpenLab can do), and sometimes you will simply need to comment on one of my posts (e.g., a Class Discussion or a Writing Workshop) or one of your classmates’ posts. The Schedule page is always clear about what you need to do (look for the capitalized bold instructions: if it states you should “write a post,” then make your own post; f it states you should “comment,” then you comment on the relevant post).

Of course, you can (& should) comment on anything whenever you feel drawn to do so … I love the way that you’re all interacting with one another (and me!) – that’s great! Keep up the wonderful conversations 🙂

Categorizing
Each time you make a post of your own, you need to “categorize” it before publishing it. This organizes the content so that others can find it more easily. I always indicate what category you should choose next to the assignment on the Schedule page, so make sure to look there. You simply uncheck “uncategorized” and then check off the right category (or categories) — don’t choose anything else.

In addition to organizing the course site, categories also ensure you get credit for your work. I will only be looking in the assigned category for your post, so if it’s not there, you’re not getting credit. Think of it this way: if you did an essay, printed it out, but handed it to the wrong professor (in the wrong classroom), what would happen? You did the work, but you wouldn’t be getting it to the right person and the right place, so you unfortunately wouldn’t get credit for your work. Same concept.

*Friendly reminder: NEVER check “Stick to the top of the blog” (in top right column under “Post Format”). This makes your post stay at the top of the blog, and as a result other important posts may be missed by others (I only really use this myself for the Weekly Announcement posts — that’s why they stay at the top). If upon reviewing your blogs you find you had checked this, please uncheck it.

Content Summary (don’t use!)
Don’t type your blog post into the “Content Summary” box at the bottom of the post editor. This will make the formatting weird and in a grey box. This option is if you wanted to provide a “summary” or overview of your longer blog post, for quick reading. We may play around with this later in the semester, but for now, you shouldn’t be using it.


Blogging Expectations & Guidelines

We are using City Tech’s OpenLab (built on the blogging software WordPress) for our course site. On the course site you can find everything you need this semester. However, this is not just a place where you will come to find information and read what I or others have already written. Instead, you are expected to consistently and actively participate in creating content on the site by blogging: posting reflections and analyses of texts, discussing ideas with me and your classmates, reading and commenting on what others have posted, and linking to/reflecting on interesting and relevant material you have found through everyday experience as well as outside research. Below are detailed guidelines for OpenLab Composing (blogging) for the course, which is a significant portion of the low-stakes / informal writing component (30% of your overall course grade).


Blog Audicence
But who is really reading our blogs?? Well, I am 🙂 But you should be too!

A friendly reminder that you are expected to read all blog posts/comments on our site (including those made by me and by your classmates), ideally before each class begins. This is a part of the required reading for the course. So yeah, you have to do it because it’s required, but it’s also an awesome way to learn from / with one another.

Blog Formality & Mechanics
Blogging has a particular form and genre‚ conventions/characteristics unique to it (just like any other mode of writing), and we will continue to discuss this style more as the semester progresses. For now, keep in mind that your entries are informal writing assignments (you can–and should!–use “I”) and you do not need to be revise them as meticulously as your formal essays or projects. However, you must still edit/proofread them for coherence/meaning as well as obvious spelling/grammar mistakes. And, always categorize your posts so everyone can find them easily (and so that I can give you credit for your work).

Blog Purpose
Blogging prepares you for the work of this course (especially the more formal assignments), but it also is an opportunity to reflect on your everyday experiences, current news/events, and personal thoughts/emotions that are related to our course content and to your progress as writers, researchers, and critical thinkers this semester.  You are not restricted to just blogging when you are assigned to do so … you should blog about things you are interested in and you feel would be of interest to others in the class. Additionally, if you want to strengthen your writing skills or increase your English language proficiency, you’re in luck: simply writing on a regular basis will aid you tremendously in reaching these goals. I encourage you to blog often!

Sometimes you will be blogging an individual reflection or reading response (similar to a journal entry), sometimes you will be posting a writing assignment (such as a proposal or draft of essay), and other times you will participate in an on-going conversation with others in the class (a prompt will either be provided by me or another student).  You may be expected to kick off a discussion on our blog, and then others will be expected to respond to you by commenting on your post. The material you post on our course blog will become part of our course content: I will discuss excerpts from student blogs (both to facilitate writing workshops and to use as a jumping-off point for the week’s reading or discussions).  In addition, everyone in the course will be reading your writing, so you should spend as much effort as possible composing your writing there. Please note that our OpenLab course site is public, so anything you post (whether a post or comment) is visible to anyone on the Web. Think about the type of content you would feel comfortable with your parents, employers, other professors, and friends seeing as representative of your work, and then post accordingly. Don’t be intimidated to put your writing out there, but be intentional.

Blog Titles
Make sure to title each blog with a concise, relevant title that clearly reflects the content of your contribution. Blogs posts will automatically provide your name and the date/time you post, and they will have the category attached to them, so there is no need to put this information in the subject line. A reader should be able to quickly glance at your blog title and have a good sense about what it contains (much like the title of an essay or a book chapter). No one wants to read 20 posts all entitled “How to Reader Like a Writer” or “Education Narrative” — be specific and creative with your titles (think of them like a “hook” that entices your readers to keep on reading the rest of your post!).

Blog Content
Unless otherwise noted or provided with a specific prompt or discussion question/s, your assigned blogs are a response to the course texts (remember, a “text” can be a short story, film, newspaper article, novel, website, advertisement, TV show, video game, song, draft of your own/a classmate’s writing, etc.). Reading response blogs should be grounded in the text(s) they are responding to: include concrete details and quotations (with correct citation, in MLA format) from these texts.

*Don’t become dependent on secondary sources to understand the texts we are reading, however. Unless specifically stated otherwise, I am primarily interested in your close reading of the texts. I want to see you work through the assigned texts, not simply report back what someone else has already written about them. When we get to the research component of our course (which we will be doing soon, with Unit 2!), this will of course change, but we’ll discuss that change when it comes.

If you feel stuck and don’t know what to write, consider one of the following approaches:

  • Find a quote, passage, or idea from one of the texts (or multiple texts) that particularly grabs your attention, is provocative, raises questions, or confuses you (however, make sure to try to grapple with the issues, not just state, “I don’t know what this means!”). Provide the excerpt (properly cited, with quotation marks and page number in parentheses) and then build your blog around engaging this excerpt.
  • If we have a number of readings for the day, you don’t need to blog on each one individually (no need to create four separate blogs!) or to simply list a few lines about each one in isolation. Instead you might try to synthesize the readings, or to focus on only one or two of them, making thematic connections among various texts.
  • Additionally, you can relate the text(s) to an outside source (another text). In this case, you should link to the material, if possible using the “link” button in the post editor (if you are unsure what an editing button does, just hover your cursor over it and then it will provide text that explains the function). Make sure to provide citation for the text (including images or videos!) and to clearly explain how/why it is related to/significant for an understanding of the assigned material. This outside information is acceptable (and often even encouraged), but you should always make sure to ground your responses in the texts that we are reading for the class, providing quotations and analysis of them as the foundation for this additional discussion.
  • Finally, even though we interact online frequently, you may not always get to discuss everything you want, or perhaps you have a new thought on something after the fact. Therefore, you can continue this line of inquiry in your blog. Don’t merely repeat what has already been discussed … make sure to flesh the ideas out in some way and build on them. Feel free to ask questions that you think should be taken up during a future class discussion.
  • And of course, you should post whenever you want: if you see a relevant on the subway – snap a photo of it, post, and blog! If you saw a TV show that made you think about some of the concepts/themes related that we’ve been discussing in the course, blog away! If you believe something in another one of your classes at City Tech, or your major, or your job, or your dreams or hopes or fears, or relates in some way (even tangentially) to what we have been discussing and you want to share with us, blog blog blog 🙂

Blogging Deadlines
Like all other work in this course, follow the deadlines for assignments as listed on the Schedule. As a general rule, I don’t accept late work. It’s important to keep up with the posts and comments, so that you can fully participate in class discussions, workshops, and assignments.

Blog Grading
I will be reading/assessing your blogs regularly, and as it says on the Syllabus, if you do the work completely, thoughtfully, professionally, and on time, you will be receiving credit for your work.

Please note, however, that simply skimming a reading and jotting down a few words about it does not mean that you have satisfactorily fulfilled a blog post. Similarly, only using spelling/grammar check on your computer does not count as revision/proofreading. You will be graded on the quality of your engagement with the material and the effectiveness of your presentation of your ideas. Missing blogs and incredibly short, general, and/or sloppy blogs will be given no (or very little) credit and will negatively affect your overall course grade. Also, note that all blogs are time-stamped automatically and late blogs will receive no credit. Blogs that are not properly categorized with the appropriate content category will receive no credit.

You can review the Blogging Grading Rubric below for more detail about how your OpenLab compositions are evaluated.

Sometimes I may leave feedback to you, either publicly or private (if it is private, I will leave a “private comment” on your post, which will be visible only to you and me — this means that the other students in the course cannot see them, and neither can the broader public). Periodically, I will designate certain blogs that are particularly strong/successful as a “Professor’s Pick” (one of the “Featured Posts”). Throughout the semester, students may also be asked (required) to nominate a blog each week for a “People’s Choice Post.” It is an honor to have your writing chosen for a Professor’s Pick or People’s Choice Post (though you shouldn’t feel badly if yours isn’t chosen … everyone can’t always be featured!), and you can use these excellent blogs as models for your own work.

Our Writing Workshops, peer review, self-reflection, and my feedback provide an ongoing assessment of your writing, but I am always more than happy to discuss your writing in more detail with you. You are welcome to visit my Office Hours at any point during the semester to get more detailed individualized feedback on your blogging and to discuss strategies for improvement


Blogging Grading Rubric

Blog Post GradeGrade Criteria
ExcellentThe post meets or exceeds the required minimum length (as stated for each assignment), is submitted on time, categorized correctly, and follows all guidelines/expectations (for blogging in general, and for that particular post, if there were additional instructions/prompts provided). The post displays a clear/competent understanding of the text(s), but moves beyond mere summary to critical engagement/dialogue with the text(s) in the context of the overall themes of the course. It extends class/online discussions with its excellent analysis, and offers compelling, insightful, and developed claims and evidence.The post is structured logically/coherently, with multiple paragraphs, each with one main idea (fully developed) and topic sentences that reflect that focus. While multiple ideas/points may be discussed, there is a unifying theme/argument to the post: a sense of how all the various points fit together. The post is virtually error free, at the sentence-level, having been carefully proofread/edited. Texts/ideas are cited completely/correctly in MLA style.
SatisfactoryThe blog post is the required length and on-topic, but offers too much summary and too little analysis. It has some good points and potential, but it does not push these ideas further to show why/how they are significant in the context of their overall response, and the overall themes of the course. The blog post is structured relatively well, but has some ideas jumbled together, sentence-level errors, and/or incorrect (or missing) citations that interfere with its clarity/persuasiveness.
Borderline / UnsatisfactoryThe blog post is submitted on time but is underdeveloped, either because it does not meet the minimum length requirement and/or does not critically/completely engage with the text(s)/assignment. It presents a great deal of summary of the texts ideas and/or the professor/classmates’ ideas (either in class or on the blog), and/or only responds tangentially/superficially/generally. It is not structured effectively, with many ideas jumbled together, no clear argument/topic sentences, incorrect/ineffective use of evidence/summary/paraphrase/citation. There are many sentence-level errors.
Not passing / no creditThe blog post was either not submitted, submitted after the deadline, very short (just a few sentences), irrelevant/off-topic, and/or doesn’t follow the assignment instructions.

Let’s Review, Reflect, & Revise!

After reading + annotating the above material, complete the below activities:

  1. Check/correct categories: Go back and review all of your posts. Make sure that they are categorized correctly (and that you haven’t checked the “Stick to the top of the blog” option). If they were not categorized correctly, please correct it now (and uncheck the “Stick to the top of the blog” if you have that checked) and then send me an email with a heads-up (and the link to all the posts in question), so I can go back and give you credit for your work.

    *Don’t forget to follow the emailing guidelines when you write me those emails!
  2. Revise your titles: if you have a generic title, come up with a stronger one and edit the title to this new one. Also include 1-2 sentences at the top of your post explaining what your old title was, what it is now, and your rationale for changing it (i.e., why is this new title better)?
  3. Comment here + Discuss: Comment below to indicate what you learned here, what you noticed when you reviewed your posts, and what you’re going to work on going forward with blogging (especially for this week’s post in response to Baldwin’s “A Talk to Teachers”). You can of course ask any questions you might too, about anything I’ve posted here.

*In order to make these fixes, simply click “edit” on your published posts, make the requested changes, and then click “Update.” (don’t change the content; and please note that, as an admin I can view all versions and revision history, so I can see what was published and when).


Thanks all! I hope this Writing Workshop was helpful! And everyone, make sure going forward with the new blogs (starting with this Friday’s post), you have awesome titles & correct categories. Looking forward to seeing you all step up your blogging games 🙂

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