People’s Choice Posts #2: The Star

Just like we did for “The Machine Stops,” read through your classmates’ reading response blogs on “The Star and choose your favorite post. You can choose a post for any reason, but you always must clearly articulate your rationale for choosing it (e.g., why did you find it interesting, compelling, likeable, provocative, etc.?). This rationale can refer to content, style, creativity, etc. If, after reading everyone’s posts, you strongly feel that your post is your “favorite,” you can always vote for yourself, but you need to provide a rationale for doing so.

In order to register your vote for this week’s “People’s Choice,” “leave a reply” to this post, and in your comment, provide your chosen post, an excerpt from it + rationale for choosing it. Provide the title and author of the chosen post, along with a link to the post you are citing (please provide the link in the same comment: don’t make a separate one with just the link). Citing is really important (in this case, citing your classmate!), and this is a way of giving credit to other sources and putting yourself in dialogue with them.

Comments/votes are mandatory, should be made no later than Tuesday, 9/25, at 12:00pm: the person with the most votes will earn the coveted “People’s Choice” honor for this round of posts! I’m looking forward to seeing what you choose, and why.

6 thoughts on “People’s Choice Posts #2: The Star

  1. sheng

    I choose Tyler Yuan’s “The Star Blog” as my first choice, your insight of the Martians being similar to humans very agreeable with me. It makes me wonder wonder if it is one of the things that the Wells is trying to point out. The huge egos that humans have created for themselves might have hindered our ability to see things on a higher plane. For example, the vast majority of the population being fascinated with the white star’s collision with Neptune, all the while ignorant to the evidence of the approaching white star to Earth. While we are looking down on the “lesser,” low intelligent species, we are the very “lesser” species in other organisms eye.

    The Star Blog

     

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  2. Tyler Yuen

    “The author was explaining the natural occurrences on Earth and in outer-space, but I never felt the emotions of the humans that was spectating this phenomenon in the sky, it was like I was just a far-away observer.”  I choose The Star Blog by Justin Bernard for People’s Choice Post. The detachment H.G. Wells intended for readers to feel was an interesting concept that I didn’t notice when reading. When authors really want their audience to identify with what they’re writing, they’ll do it by focusing on specific scenes rather than telling what people are saying/doing then moving on.  Creating realistic situations are also a good way to get readers to empathize with characters, and although there were plenty of them (such as the woman mourning her dead spouse), there just wasn’t enough time to understand any of the characters. None of them were given any importance except the master mathematician and even he was quickly removed from the picture. When the apocalypse strikes Earth, all the danger humanity faces is just blurted out to us giving us no time to really understand how humans feel.  Their emotions are all over the place while we’re just watching.

    The Star Blog

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  3. Christopher Navarrete

    For my people’s choice post, I choose Sheng. In her post, Sheng gives an in-depth discussion on how the humans reacted to their imminent demise: “They seem oblivious to the effects and dangers of the collision. Instead of worrying, humans make themselves the audience ignorant of the fact that they are a part of the play. It makes one wonder if it is human nature to remain ignorant to impending threats until it is too late.” I feel she makes a convincing argument on how Wells’ characters parallel our own society.

    She also makes an interesting comparison between the characters of “The Machine Stops” and “The Star.” For example, she states, “[t]here have been warnings and signs of the Machine stopping, but the people just played it off as temporary.” This is similar to what happens in “The Star.”

    The Star Blog

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  4. Vishal Naraine

    “Humans, at least the vast majority of humans, are all lazy and self-centered. As long as things do not concern or benefit them, they make no move” (Sheng Nan Zhang). I chose Sheng because she brought up some interesting points. One point was about human nature. She claims that humans are lazy and self-centered. I agree with her. Humans have the tendency to avoid work and think that the world revolves around them. Another point was about the human reaction. When the humans learned about the ‘Star’ colliding with Neptune, their reaction was excited. This also displays how as humans we are excited about another plants’ doom. Humans do not realize the effects this collision may have. Sheng also compares human precaution to our own society. She mentions global warming as a problem that humans do not find ways to prevent it from happening.

    https://openlab.citytech.cuny.edu/belli-f2018-eng2420/the-star-blog-3/

     

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  5. Karen

    I’m choosing  Justin Bernard.response to “the Star” because I felt that it was very similar to the way I also viewed the story “However, there was an detachment from the from the story . The author was explaining the natural occurrences on earth and in outer-space , but I  never felt the emotions of the humans that was spectating this phenomenon in the sky, it was like I was just far-way observer. This is just like reading a regular newspaper.” Especially in these few lines I felt that Justine fully encompassed how I thought of the story which was very sterile and void of emotion. Overall I think his comments on the story are very accurate in there depiction. Unlike the other story we read which was full  of emotion and showed how people based most of there choices on emotions this story was very matter of fact. I also like how Justine also compared the story to a news paper article which at the moment of reading the story I hadn’t made the connection but now looking back on it it does share some connection to an article especially since in the end the Martines seem to be more of the directed audience to this story.

    The Star Blog

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