Category Archives: There Will Come Soft Rains

Does the Mean Justify the End

In the short story  “August 2026: There Will Come Soft Rains” it describes the two halfs of advancements in technology. The story begins with a house which is made to take care of whoever is living in it. Waking them up, making breakfast and cleaning is all done by the house. This is an example of technology at the level everyone wants to be where humans do no work thanks to the “good” advancement of technology. But there is one catch to the house. There is no one living in the it why is that? Why abandon a house with such luxury.  Well later in the story we read about a dog entering the house wounded and covered in sores (page 2, para. 3) it wanders the house looking for some sense of life which it did not.

The dog dies later after finding food in the house and is burned thanks to the house self cleaning robots. This dogs shows us the other half the bad half and another bint given near the beginning of the story where the house read  “There Will Come Soft Rains” (page 3) which describes the world will be better off without humanity. Humanity must have faced technology weaponized (nuclear bombs) killing all living organisms it can touch with one hit and slowly killing the ones with the aftermath of radiation which could have caused the sores on the dog. Ray Bradbury warns us to be careful with the power we have due that it could be the same power to end it all.

End of Days

The story of, “August 2026: There Will Come Soft Rains” by Ray Bradbury is a story of a post-apocalyptic environment in the city of Allendale, California in August 4, 2026. In this story there are no people, just a city in ruins with animals and abandoned materials. There is also the setting of where the story took place and it was within a “smart house”, ( a name i decided to give it because i do not know what else to call it). The smart house is extremely futuristic with function built robots that actively do things around the house in clockwork. At a specific time everyday the house sends these robots to do chores a normal person would regularly do. The house was so robotic yet the narrator put so much personification into this, “In the living room the voice clock sang, tick tock, seven o’clock. Time to get up. Time to get up, seven o’clock! As if it were afraid that nobody would.” (Bradbury, 1). I found this line very interesting and it was literally the first line of the story. I found this line interesting because it projected an image of a clock literally singing that it is seven o’clock and it is time to get up also the fact that it said it was like it was scared that nobody would get up which I learned eventually that nobody was even home to wake up.

The reason for the apocalypse to leave a city of ruins is later given to us as a read between the lines type of scenario, “At night the ruined city gave off a radioactive glow that could be seen for miles.” (Bradbury, 1). I feel like the city is in ruins because of pollution or just some other means of the environment finally collapsing, maybe the city even got nuked and the radioactivity remained. Clearly this is the inevitability we humans would have to face if we do not keep the environment clean and if we wage war among ourselves . The city of Allendale in this story left behind nothing but their technology, their perfect homes with nobody to live in it. The other reason i believe it was pollution or just the result of war that left this ruined city the way it did was when a dog was introduced in the story and had just randomly died. Do not get me wrong the dog was described as bony but it was still able to move around and chase its tail. “it ran wildly in circles, biting at its tail, spun in a frenzy, and died.” (Bradbury, 2). This was during the time when the house was making pancakes that filled the house with its odor. The way the dog died can only be explained due to the vicious reaction to the radioactivity of the city that had finally kicked in for the dog.

I think it is crazy how technology can evolve so much yet what worth is it when there is potential for nuclear warfare in a world where everyone is walking on egg shells. How can we enjoy our creations when despair lurks around the corner? At the end of the story a falling tree broke into the house and caused a fire when it landed on the stove which was on because it was that time of the evening to make dinner. Even with the fire procedures the house has built in, it could not put out the fire. Man created this perfect machine yet because of its own destruction it had basically ruined it’s own creation.

The Post God Era

        First, I’m  going to give a short introduction so i can get it out of the way and go right into the response. There Will Come Soft Rains is a post apocalyptic world of an unspecified year in the future where there are nothing left but the creations that withstood the initial cataclysmic events that lead to the destruction of a race of beings who, to anyone looking in from an outsider’s perspective, were gods who transformed the entire world for both better and worse.

       From what i can tell by this story’s imagery alone (and there is a lot of imagery to be read), it seems that the world, as of now has gone through a drastic change. And with that change came a newly  formed environment and the loss of an almost godly race who did amazing things but, sadly as of now, are nothing but a memory that will soon enough be long forgotten through the test of time. The only thing that have been left behind by this race were their creations. Their large steel and glass structures, concrete pavements that covered almost every inch of ground, Their gruesome markings left on the animals who were unfortunate enough to live through the cataclysmic event and now have to suffer and struggle to survive in their new post god home. And last but not least.  the autonomous machinations that go through their daily routines time and time again out without end. This story kind of hits me in a weird place now that i think about it. I think it mostly has to do with the fact that there will be a time where the human race will sooner or later cease to exist. It’s that kind of depressing feeling that gets even weirder when you realise that once they’re all gone. Time will go on without them. As many of us know, time waits for no man or thing. Days go by, nature goes on and the and things that once were, such as the things we leave behind will sooner or later be gone by deterioration . This gets driven home even more when the story talks about the house that keeps running and the machines that were created to serve still continue on with their duties even with the absence of the masters who created them. We are even given a mention of a dog who we can assume belonged to the ones that used to live in the story’s main setting which is the house because of this excerpt:  “A dog whined, shivering, on the front porch. The front door recognized the dog voice and opened.”  I guess, the theme of this story is the fact that everything has to come to an end. There is always an expiry date to everything that gets created. And this rule  is no different for our race as well. The whole theme of ending is shown in many different ways but, the two main ways are the dog who was  “once huge and fleshy, but now gone to bone and covered with sores,” which later dies because of the horrible condition it is left in after the event. And soon after is later cleaned up by the house’s cleaning system, never to be seen again. And, the machinations who soon cease to function because of the a psychotic and destructive fire which is further personified. Oh, i guess it’s should be important to tell you that there is quite a bit of personification in this story. Most of the personification is given the the automatons which makes a bit of sense considering the fact they’re pretty much the closest thing to the race that created them. Personification itself is used to further make the ending of the machination more disturbing. Lines such as “the voices wailed Fire, fire, run, run, like a tragic nursery rhyme, a dozen voices, high, low, like children dying in a forest, alone, alone. And the voices fading as the wires popped their sheathings like hot chestnuts. One, two, three, four, five voices died” which explains  explains what happens to the almost living creations who are burned and later destroyed by the fire.

       So, all in all.. You know what? I don’t think i have have much of a response to this story ( i personally don’t think that this is even a great and succinct response) other than the fact that everything has an expiration date. Everything has a big fat END to its lifespan  that anything or anyone will inevitably reach.  And as that time comes, time goes on without them regardless. 

  You know, it would be a good idea to end this response here but i don’t really like leaving these things off at a very depressing finish such as this so, I’m going to end it on a somewhat positive note.  Sure, everything has an end but, Everything DOES have a beginning. Destruction is bound to happen regardless of who or what you are but, destruction is always followed by creation. Forests that are burned down later regrows into a stronger, more lush environments. Trees whose autumn leaves fall off and die later grow new ones as a new spring arrives. Sure, sooner or later, the human race will cease to exist but In our place, new things will grow.  I mean, who knows, maybe a new race of intelligent beings will sooner or later,  find our remains and preserve them as a long lasting memory that will serve as a symbol of the race who once ruled their world as gods. 

There’s a TALKING house?

It starts off nicely with a nice alarm to ruin your morning (definitely not a morning person) at seven in the morning. The nice description of breakfast being made and the constant reminders of the time. I myself don’t like being reminded of the time as it makes me uneasy. I would definitely pull my phone out of my pocket to check the time every few minutes if I did. It was an ordinary reading and nice family described. Also the constant reminder of the date and that was August 4, 2026. There was a family living in the house and it happened to be Mr. Featherstone’s birthday  and the aniiversary of Tilita. As time passed and as we start to turn the page, the story suddenly changes the atmosphere. As time went on, at around 10 o’ clock, we were told that the house was the only one remaining.  A quote that changed the mood was, “Still further over, their images burned on wood in one titanic instant, a small boy, hands flung into the air; higher up, the images of a thrown ball, and opposite him a girl, hands raised to catch a ball which never came down” (Bradbury, 1). From what I interpreted, was that the children and the family have died and the only thing that remained in the house was the animals (especially the rats), and the voice. I felt as if the narrator was the voice telling us the time and what the family would usually do.

Honestly this story wasn’t that amusing but, there was a certain part that stood out again and that was when the dog suddenly died. “The dog ran upstairs, hysterically yelping at each door,at last realizing, as the house realized, that only silence was here… The dog frothed at the mouth, lying at the door, sniffing, its eyes turned to fire. It ran wildly in circles, biting at its tail, spun in a frenzy, and died” (Bradbury, 2). I was still puzzled on how the dog died and why did the dog bite its own tail but all left unanswered. Maybe the house didn’t want an intruder in the house and what may back up my claim is in page 3, where the voice reads to no one a poem. The poem being the title of the story “There will Come Soft Rains” and apparently it is whomever the voice is reading to their favorite. Suddenly fire breaks out; killing the many voices in the the house and the voice is quite frantic. Only apart of the wall remains and continues to repeat the date but this time says “Today is August 5, 2026, today is August 5, 2026, today is …” (Bradbury, 4). Part of the house still wants to remember the family because in the beginning, we the readers were told that the house was the only one remaining. And maybe on August 5, 2026, the wall will continue to remember the family that lived in the house and continue acting as if the family were going about their everyday lives.

Technology on its own

From the beginning of the short story, “August 2026: There Will Come Soft Rains” by Ray Bradbury, we begin to read into what is placed in a futuristic setting. The story itself is based on the futuristic setting of technology in the year 2026 where there is not a single soul available to answer to it. In the beginning of the story, we are introduced to what is a house equipped with such futuristic technology which makes it as much a smart house. But this house seems to be abandoned as is represented by the following quotes, “The morning house lay empty” & “The clock ticked on, repeating and repeating its sounds into the emptiness.” (Bradbury, Page 1, Paragraph 1). But although there is no one to answer to it, the house keeps on tending to its daily tasks and routines as if it was expecting someone on its side.

When reading the story, the sudden realization comes to mind that the entire city itself has no residents and not just the house alone has no one to tend to it. Further on into the story, Bradbury writes “The house stood alone in a city of rubble and ashes. This was the one house left standing. At night the ruined city gave off a radioactive glow which could be seen for miles” (Bradbury, Page 1, Paragraph 8). What I come to think of this is that this house and city might be abandoned because something big happened. By big, I could mean as if a large fire had taken place, or rather an incident involving nuclear weapons or bombs leading to abandonment or the deaths of its residents. That could explain the reasoning for why this city looks as abandoned as it is described in the beginning of the story.

Upon further reading into the story, we learn about the existence of a form of life in the city which is a dog! We read the lines “A dog whined, shivering, on the front porch. The front door recognized the dog voice and opened.” (Bradbury, Page 2, Paragraph 3). From this we gather that this dog may have been closely related to the owners of the house, the house wouldn’t just accept itself to anyone as it has been shutting most of life out of it for as much as we’ve read the story so far. The dog itself represents something of importance to the house. But sadly, the dog itself was injured and needed care and had died later on in the house. But the house itself had a job then, and it was to take care of the remains of the dog and had cremated the dog with the help of its robot mice.

Stories start to turn for the house as now it itself is starting to undergo its own destruction. “At ten o’clock the house began to die” (Bradbury, Page 3, Paragraph 5). Here we start to witness the house starting to fall, sounds of “Fire, fire, fire!” (Bradbury, Page 3, Paragraph 5) are yelled by the house as it begins to come ablaze by fire spreading through it. This was the beginning of the end for the house and the technology built into it.

Overall looking at the things the house has done in the story, it’s amazing how the technology is written in the future to handle the normal tasks done by individuals in our time now. Today we talk about how we would love for Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Technology to be far so advanced where we won’t have to do as much as lay our finger down on a keypad to control it and here in the story is the exact same thoughts played out. The house in this story has a well thought out mind of its own which is the embodiment of what we want AI Technology to be doing in the future. In the story, it is very evident of how technology will outlast us as human life and what can happen when we no longer exist to tell it what to do. But at the same time, somewhere along the line, there is a limit to what technology can do on its own and at some point without a handler or someone to guide it, it can fail and will meet its end.

Nature vs Technology

The story “August 2026: There Will Come Soft Rains” by Ray Bradbury speaks in my opinion to how man and technology are once working together for a purpose but if one, in this case, man are taken out of the equation there is no purpose after all. In the story the house, being a sort of protagonist in this story, is filled with technology which is supposed to make life easier for it’s tenants. The house begins announcing the date and time in the beginning of the story and throughout, stating “today is August 4, 2026” (Bradbury 1). This can be seen as a repetitive notion which is announced everyday. The house is suppose to be helping it’s tenants get ready for work, get the house clean afterwards and make sure it is ready for the time they come back.

There is one problem with this situation though, there are no tenants. So the question raised is, is there a purpose to all of this if there is no one to enjoy the perks and hard work of the house? It is similar to the saying of “if a try falls in an empty forest and no one is there to hear it, does is it still make a sound? Technology is great and in many ways makes our lives easier but there is still mankind needed for certain things. The way mechanical life is able to continue with daily routine makes it seem as if it would be okay without humans to get to enjoy what the house is able to do, but at the end of the story as with everything, there is death and destruction.

At the end of the story there is a great destruction of the house by fire, a fire started by a tree falling down. This tree being representing natural life, the house still representing mechanical life. The fire and house fight till the death, once coming back and punching the other. The house making its final attempts to put out the fire with all the tricks it knows. At the end the house is consumed by flames and there is nothing but a wall standing at the end. This single wall is still able, like the beginning, to tell you the date saying, “today is August 5, 2026 (Bradbury 4), repeating this over and over again. In this case the fire (nature) consumed the entire house with its fury, one can say it won after all, but what can be said about the wall still standing from the house, so who won after wall.

Ray Bradbury’s warning of nuclear warfare

In “August 2026: There Will Come Soft Rains”, prominent science-fiction writer Ray Bradbury writes a short story about the benefits and dangers of technological advances, especially of nuclear warfare, which was a major concern during the Cold War era. Disclaimer: I have read this story before.

The short story set in the far future (from the story’s time of writing: 1950), and it describes a fully automated house, with many quality-of-life functions and robots to aid its inhabitants. Much of the story describes the functions of the house’s technological marvels. The house has several automated functions. There is an automated voiced stove that cooks meals: “In the kitchen the breakfast stove gave a hissing sigh and ejected from its warm interior eight pieces of perfectly browned toast, eight eggs sunnyside up, sixteen slices of bacon, two coffees, and two cool glasses of milk” (Bradbury, 1), as well as automated robots that clean the interior of the house at timed intervals: “Out of warrens in the wall, tiny robot mice darted. The rooms were acrawl with the small cleaning animals, all rubber and metal. They thudded against chairs, whirling their mustached runners, kneading the rug nap, sucking gently at hidden dust. Then, like mysterious invaders, they popped into their burrows. Their pink electric eyes faded. The house was clean” (Bradbury, 1).  However, it is revealed that the house is empty,  and the house’s automated functions persist even though noone is living in the house (Bradbury, 1-2).

There is a significant reveal: “The sun came out from behind the rain. The house stood alone in a city of rubble and ashes. This was the one house left standing. At night the ruined city gave off a radioactive glow which could be seen for miles” (Bradbury, 1). This quote reveals that there has been a nuclear apocalypse, and there is no human life around. All other buildings in the city have been reduced to “rubble and ashes”, and that the “ruined city gave off a radioactive glow” references the grim aftermath of a nuclear impact. There are other quotes throughout the story that emphasize a post-nuclear event, but one paragraph had the most impact: “the charred west side where the house had been burned evenly free of its white paint. The entire west face of the house was black, save for five places. Here the silhouette in paint of a man mowing a lawn. Here, as in a photograph, a woman bent to pick flowers. Still farther over, their images burned on wood in one titanic instant, a small boy, hands flung into the air; higher up, the image of a thrown ball, and opposite him a girl, hands raised to catch a ball which never came down. The five spots of paint—the man, the woman, the children, the ball—remained. The rest was a thin charcoaled layer” (Bradbury, 1). This paragraph is a graphic description of “nuclear shadows”, which is a phenomenon of the aftereffects of a nuclear explosion. Because of a nuclear detonation’s intense heat, shadows are left permanently imprinted into surfaces. There are several photographs[1][2] of this phenomenon in the aftermath of the nuclear detonations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during the Second World War. There is also a stroke of irony in the short story, as an automated voice reads a poem describing wildlife in nature not caring if mankind ceased to exist (Bradbury, 3). The poem also draws ironic parallels to the technology in the house, which also does not care if mankind did not exist.

Bradbury’s story details the great benefits that technology has to offer mankind (automated robots, quality of life), as well as its dangers (nuclear warfare). During the Cold War era, the United States and the Soviet Union were deathly afraid of nuclear warfare with each other. This short story was published in 1950, which was shortly after the Soviet Union had completed its first successful nuclear test on August 29, 1949. Nuclear tensions between the superpowers of the US and the USSR would reach many tipping points throughout history, the most famous is the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. Many people who grew up during the Cold War era had nuclear apocalypse on their minds, as it was a real possibility during those times.

Technology will take over…..eventually

It’s insane how today I was actually speaking about how some people will one day lose their jobs and be replaced with technology that can do the job for them, and here goes a story about the future. I did find “August 2026: There Will Come Soft Rains” to be a tad bit sad, it is a story that is taking place in the future inside of a home that takes care of itself. It is the ONLY home that seemed to have survived a nuclear blast. But, it is not like any modern home, this home is completely automated and regardless of what occurred during this time, it continued to run on the schedule that it was built upon, completing all house duties on its own. Page one, paragraph 7-8, “Nine-fifteen, sang the clock, time to clean. Out of warrens in the wall, tiny robot mice darted. The rooms were acrawl with the small cleaning animals, all rubber and metal. They thudded against chairs, whirling their mustached runners, kneading the rug nap, sucking gently at hidden dust. Then, like mysterious invaders, they popped into their burrows. Their pink electric eyes faded. The house was clean. Ten o’clock. The sun came out from behind the rain. The house stood alone in a city of rubble and ashes. This was the one house left standing. At night the ruined city gave off a radioactive glow which could be seen for miles.” The part of the tiny mice cleaning after the mess that was made sort of reminds me of something you would see in a Disney movie, except that these are robotic and do not sing. It isn’t too far from what mankind has created so far as of today. There are some cleaning products that do its job on its own by the push of a button. When it states that the home stood alone in a city of ashes, it was so easy to imagine the environment and how it was left after this nuclear incident, although this may not totally relate in a way it does, after 9/11 every block in the area was covered with smoke and ash and therefore I Imagined this home surrounded by dust just as shown in photos of how lower Manhattan looked after the terrorist attack. This house was clearly so self-sustained that it survived a nuclear blast.
There was a part in this story that broke my heart where it states, “Until this day, how well the house had kept its peace. How carefully had it inquired, “Who goes there? What’s the password?” and, getting no answer from lonely foxes and whining cats, it had shut up its windows and drawn shades in an old maidenly preoccupation with self-protection which bordered on a mechanical paranoia. It quivered at each sound, the house did. If a sparrow brushed a window, the shade snapped up. The bird, startled, flew off! No, not even a bird must touch the house! The house was an altar with ten thousand attendants, big, small, servicing, attending, in choirs. But the gods had gone away, and the ritual of the religion continued senselessly, uselessly. Twelve noon. A dog whined, shivering, on the front porch. The front door recognized the dog voice and opened. The dog, once huge and fleshy, but now gone to bone and covered with sores, moved in and through the house, tracking mud. Behind it whirred angry mice, angry at having to pick up mud, angry at inconvenience.” Page 2, Paragraph 12-15. The humans that lived in this home are clearly dead, it seems as though many humans are gone and what is left are animals that have been hurt and traumatized.  It’s interesting how an altar was mentioned and religion, who was going to pray if everyone is dead? I believe this was set for people to imagine the animals looking out for help from humans, just as how some humans sometimes pray to a god in time of need. In this case, religion was now “useless” since there were no longer any “gods”.  The part with the home opening its doors for the dog was very clear to imagine as well. I imagined it as what a human would do for its very own, protecting its dog from danger or just welcoming their pet back home. Even without any humans left, the home still knew its responsibility as a caretaker, not only for the people that once lived there but for the dog as well. This family dog was unfortunately injured by the nuclear blast and did not last, and yet again, the house took care of what needed to be done. At this point, I still asked myself how these animals survived and humans didn’t. Towards the end when the house begins to say a poem, “There will come soft rains and the smell of the ground, And swallows circling with their shimmering sound; And frogs in the pools singing at night, And wild plum trees in tremulous white; Robins will wear their feathery fire, Whistling their whims on a low fence-wire; And not one will know of the war, not one Will care at last when it is done. Not one would mind, neither bird nor tree, if mankind perished utterly; And Spring herself, when she woke at dawn Would scarcely know that we were gone.” I feel as though this is a HUGE connection to how no human survived this nuclear yet, ANIMALS DID! It’s as if it’s saying that after humanity has been destroyed, nature will continue to prosper. Amazing. 

“August 2026: There WIll Come Soft Rain”

This article is about an horrific event that transpires in the future, “August 2026: There Will Come Soft Rains” (1950) written by Ray Bradbury tells us a story about the near future and the devastating power of a nuclear war, because what else can “radioactive glow” (Bradbury,1,10) mean if not the aftermath of war. After all, many life forms still seem to co-exist around the big house in the middle of the city. However, there isn’t much leftover. So, who was left to take in the remaining scenery of a once full city?

The author, Ray Bradbury describes to us a magnificent scenery inside the house, “In the kitchen the breakfast stove gave a hissing sigh and ejected from its warm interior eight pieces of perfectly browned toast, eight eggs Sunnyside up, sixteen slices of bacon, two coffees and two cool glasses of milk.” (Bradbury,1,2), giving us an insight into the family’s daily morning routine, and how big the family is, a house that is self-automated and goes about daily chores. However, Bradbury explains that the house is empty, “But no doors slammed, no carpets took the soft tread of rubber heels. It was raining outside. The weather box on the front door sang quietly: “Rain, rain, go away; rubbers, raincoats for today…” And the rain tapped on the empty house, echoing.” (Bradbury,1,5). Giving the reader an understanding that no one will ever take advantage of living in such a home. No more children running around. No more parents leaving for work. It is all gone and no one is here to witness this spiritual scene. To capture it in its entirety, before it too goes away.

Even though the house itself is empty, we get a glimpse of a creature entering the house of automation. Out of many creatures, the loyal companion of man enters the house, and now we finally have someone to admire the beauty that is the house that still stands. However, the author has a different plan in mind, “It sniffed the air and scratched the kitchen door. Behind the door, the stove was making pancakes which filled the house with a rich baked odor and the scent of maple syrup. The dog frothed at the mouth, lying at the door, sniffing, its eyes turned to fire. It ran wildly in circles, biting at its tail, spun in a frenzy, and died.” (Bradbury, 2, 8), yes, the dog passes away, the last living creature to take in the beauty of the scenery but blinded by hungry it only saw fire through its eyes and couldn’t hold on to life any longer.

We were witness to the passing of the dog, but the greatest tragedy is yet to come. Bradbury lets the reader know in one sentence, “The wind blew. A falling tree bough crashed through the kitchen window. Cleaning solvent, bottled, shattered over the stove. The room was ablaze in an instant.” (Bradbury, 3,12). Thus, ends another life is lost, the building goes down screaming in a frantic yell, “fire!”, the robots scurry around frantic to eliminate the threat, but to no avail. The only thing left standing is one wall, just one, and it will be the most beautiful, picture perfect scene to be witnessed. “Today is August 5, 2026, today is August 5, 2026, today is…” (Bradbury,4, last), and now it is over, there is no one left.

Reading Response #4 August 2026: There Will Come Soft Rains

The first time I read the story, I wasn’t intrigued. But I gained insight and my interest was piqued after rereading it. All I can say is that this passage could foreshadow the near future. It’s hell on earth for humans.

The text should arouse speculation among all humans since for us, the setting and events of the story are 9 years from now. As the title says and as it’s mentioned in the story, “‘Today is August 4, 2026,’ said a second voice from the kitchen ceiling, ‘in the city of Allendale, California.'” (Bradbury, page 1, paragraph 3). The setting is automatically given in this sentence.

The city in this passage is practically a barren wasteland of a ghost town. “The house stood alone in a city of rubble and ashes. This was the one house left standing. At night the ruined city gave off a radioactive glow which could be seen for miles.” (Bradbury, page 1, paragraph 8). The imagery in paragraph 8 on page 1 could hint at what possibly happened. As some of the words in the poem indicate, “And not one will know of the war, not one will care at last when it is done. Not one would mind, neither bird nor tree, if mankind perished utterly; And Spring herself, when she woke at dawn would scarcely know that we were gone.” (Bradbury, page 3, paragraph 2). The poem reveals the fact that there was a war and all of Allendale’s inhabitants were casualties. In other words, the city is devoid of humanity, which has gone extinct. They ceased to exist after a possible nuclear bomb was dropped on Allendale.

After humanity’s extermination, the house was the only thing that represented civilization. The inanimate became animate as personification is used throughout the story. Man’s supposed best friend, the dog, was the only living remnant in a place run by robots. Unfortunately, the canine met its demise shortly after being introduced.

Allendale has been turned into a dystopia where only artificial intelligence, arguably man’s greatest innovation, reigns supreme. Life goes on without homo sapiens. The androids perform their duties, unaware that their owners are forever gone. “The house was an altar with ten thousand attendants, big, small, servicing, attending, in choirs. But the gods had gone away, and the ritual of the religion continued senselessly, uselessly.” (Bradbury, page 2, paragraph 3).

This story reflects how far the world has come in its attempts to revolutionize itself, especially since the 1950’s. Humans have become increasingly dependent on technology, which they’ve strived to improve over the course of history. There Will Come Soft Rains gives a possible glimpse of what’s to come, according to Ray Bradbury. For him, it’s a dystopian future that’s ways off. But for us living in 2017, 2026 is the near, impending future that lies just on the horizon.

We humans are an intricate, yet controversial species. We enter this world only to exit it just as easily. We have the potential to evolve, yet we devolve all the same. We’re a means to an end and the end justifies the means. The only thing for sure is that nothing is for sure. We agree to disagree with each other, nothing more and nothing less. That is all we tend to do. That is all we will ever amount to. That is what defines us individually and as a whole species.

This tale reflects the idea that humans have the potential to bring about both construction and destruction. Our very own creations can be used against one another and become our destroyers. In the story, weapons are human inventions and are used as instruments of destruction in a time of war. Despite this, things continue as planned. We all play our own roles in the script of life. We live as actors only to be taken off the script and die. That’s the ugliest beauty of all. It’s evolution then, now, and forever.