Response 13

Stephen Duncombe in “Politics in an Age of Fantasy”  talks about how society doesn’t listen to the truth unless it is a spectacle shown in center stage. Sometimes fantasy is used alongside spectacle to create a narrative, a better story made to draw in more individuals. Duncombe uses the fight of evolution and creationism as an example. According to Duncombe, while the theory of evolution has a plethora amount of evidence to back it up, people still support creationism because it has a compelling narrative. Stories such Moses and Krishna connect “with peoples dreams and desires, that resonates with the symbols and myths they find meaningful” (Duncombe 20). however once “stripped of their narratives and symbols they would have no power to move their audience, and thus no power at all. (Duncombe 12).

I believe it would be best to create a detournment that gets people involved and interested. As Duncombe states, this could be achieved by creating some kind of narrative instead of simply using facts. This narrative could make others hopeful or passionate. The detournment should also be seen as a spectacle. Perhaps it could be colorful and have a lot of action going on.

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1 Response to Response 13

  1. Rownak C says:

    I completely agree with the way that you think we should showcase our project. We’ve learned much throughout the course of this course…we were privileged enough to. But whatever we did learn/come to realize have been in the course of three months. Imagine trying to instill that sort of social understanding onto someone in the streets who has not yet been exposed to the harsh truths of things. That too in the matter of minutes. Which is why, like you typed, I also believe that creating a narrative which resonates with individuals internally is very important in getting our projects to become a success.

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